Part I Crime Summary 1975 - 2016

data.greensboro-nc.gov | Last Updated 12 Jun 2017

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program has been the starting place for law enforcement executives, students of criminal justice, researchers, members of the media, and the public at large seeking information on crime in the nation. Part I categorizes incidents in two categories: violent and property crimes. Aggravated assault, forcible rape, murder, and robbery are classified as violent crime, while burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft are classified as property crimes. This dataset contains FBI Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Part I crime data for the last 40 years in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Tags: police, part i, crime, ucr, uniform crime reports, crime index, historical crime, violent, property, murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, assault, burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft, theft

This dataset has the following 12 columns:

Column NameAPI Column NameData TypeDescriptionSample Values
YearyearnumberRepresents a calendar year from January 1st through December 31st.
PopulationpopulationnumberPopulation figures for 2014 and 2015 are from the City's Planning Department. Previously North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation estimates were used to determine population figure, with the exception of years where US Census values were known.
Total Part One CrimesindexnumberPart I categorizes incidents in two categories: violent and property crimes. Aggravated assault, forcible rape, murder, and robbery are classified as violent crime, while burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft are classified as property crimes.
Total Violent CrimesviolentnumberIn the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, violent crime is composed of four offenses: murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Violent crimes are defined in the UCR Program as those offenses, which involve force or threat of force.
Total Property CrimespropertynumberIn the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, property crime includes the offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. The object of the theft-type offenses is the taking of money or property, but there is no force or threat of force against the victims.
MurdermurdernumberThe FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program defines murder as the willful killing of one human being by another. Violent crime in UCR Reports counts the number of victims, not incidents. The UCR Program does not include the following situations in this offense classification: deaths caused by negligence, suicide, or accident; justifiable homicides; and attempts to murder or assaults to murder, which are scored as aggravated assaults.
RaperapenumberForcible rape, as defined in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, is the carnal knowledge of a person forcibly and against their will. Violent crime in UCR Reports counts the number of victims, not incidents. Attempts or assaults to commit rape by force or threat of force are also included; however, statutory rape (without force) and other sex offenses are excluded.
RobberyrobberynumberThe FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program defines robbery as the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. These instances include Robbery of Individual as well as Commercial Robbery.
AssaultassaultnumberThe FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program defines aggravated assault as an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. The UCR Program further specifies that this type of assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by other means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. Attempted aggravated assault that involves the display of—or threat to use—a gun, knife, or other weapon is included in this crime category because serious personal injury would likely result if the assault were completed. Shooting into Occupied Dwelling is included. Violent crime in UCR Reports counts the number of victims, not incidents.
BurglaryburglarynumberThe FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program defines burglary as the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. To classify an offense as a burglary, the use of force to gain entry need not have occurred. The UCR Program has three sub-classifications for burglary: forcible entry, unlawful entry where no force is used, and attempted forcible entry. The UCR definition of “structure” includes apartment, barn, house trailer or houseboat when used as a permanent dwelling, office, railroad car (but not automobile), stable, and vessel (i.e., ship).
LarcenylarcenynumberThe FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program defines larceny-theft as the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Examples are thefts of bicycles, motor vehicle parts and accessories, shoplifting, pocket-picking, or the stealing of any property or article that is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, check fraud, etc., are excluded.
Motor Vehicle TheftmvtnumberIn the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, motor vehicle theft is defined as the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. In the UCR Program, a motor vehicle is a self-propelled vehicle that runs on land surfaces and not on rails. Examples of motor vehicles include sport utility vehicles, automobiles, trucks, buses, motorcycles, motor scooters, all-terrain vehicles, and snowmobiles. Motor vehicle theft does not include farm equipment, bulldozers, airplanes, construction equipment, or watercraft such as motorboats, sailboats, houseboats, or jet skis. The taking of a motor vehicle for temporary use by persons having lawful access is excluded from this definition.