Uninsured Population Census Data CY 2009-2014 Human Services

data.pa.gov | Last Updated 25 Jul 2018

This data is pulled from the U.S. Census website. This data is for years Calendar Years 2009-2014. Product: SAHIE File Layout Overview Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program - SAHIE Filenames: SAHIE Text and SAHIE CSV files 2009 – 2014 Source: Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program, U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date: May 2016 Description: Model‐based Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) for Counties and States File Layout and Definitions The Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program was created to develop model-based estimates of health insurance coverage for counties and states. This program builds on the work of the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) program. SAHIE is only source of single-year health insurance coverage estimates for all U.S. counties. For 2008-2014, SAHIE publishes STATE and COUNTY estimates of population with and without health insurance coverage, along with measures of uncertainty, for the full cross-classification of: •5 age categories: 0-64, 18-64, 21-64, 40-64, and 50-64 •3 sex categories: both sexes, male, and female •6 income categories: all incomes, as well as income-to-poverty ratio (IPR) categories 0-138%, 0-200%, 0-250%, 0-400%, and 138-400% of the poverty threshold •4 races/ethnicities (for states only): all races/ethnicities, White not Hispanic, Black not Hispanic, and Hispanic (any race). In addition, estimates for age category 0-18 by the income categories listed above are published. Each year’s estimates are adjusted so that, before rounding, the county estimates sum to their respective state totals and for key demographics the state estimates sum to the national ACS numbers insured and uninsured. This program is partially funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC), National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection ProgramLink to a non-federal Web site (NBCCEDP). The CDC have a congressional mandate to provide screening services for breast and cervical cancer to low-income, uninsured, and underserved women through the NBCCEDP. Most state NBCCEDP programs define low-income as 200 or 250 percent of the poverty threshold. Also included are IPR categories relevant to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2014, the ACA will help families gain access to health care by allowing Medicaid to cover families with incomes less than or equal to 138 percent of the poverty line. Families with incomes above the level needed to qualify for Medicaid, but less than or equal to 400 percent of the poverty line can receive tax credits that will help them pay for health coverage in the new health insurance exchanges. We welcome your feedback as we continue to research and improve our estimation methods. The SAHIE program's age model methodology and estimates have undergone internal U.S. Census Bureau review as well as external review. See the SAHIE Methodological Review page for more details and a summary of the comments and our response. The SAHIE program models health insurance coverage by combining survey data from several sources, including: •The American Community Survey (ACS) •Demographic population estimates •Aggregated federal tax returns •Participation records for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp program •County Business Patterns •Medicaid •Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) participation records •Census 2010 Margin of error (MOE). Some ACS products provide an MOE instead of confidence intervals. An MOE is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds can be created by adding the margin of error to the estimate (for the upper bound) and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate (for the lower bound). All published ACS margins of error are based on a 90-percent confidence level.

Tags: uninsured, population, pid, dhs, insurance, census

This dataset has the following 168 columns:

Column NameAPI Column NameData TypeDescriptionSample Values
County NamecountytextCounty within the State of Pennsylvania. There are 67 counties.
County Code Numbercounty_code_numbernumberNumbers 1-67 representing Pennsylvania counties.
County Codecounty_codetextUsing the numbers 1-67 representing Pennsylvania counties and showing the leading zeroes in this text fields to match in other files and make coding easier.
State FIPS Codestate_fips_codetextThese are the first 2 digits of the 5-digit Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code that designate the State association. Each State has its own 2-digit number and each County within the state has its own 3-digit number which are combined into a 5-digit number to uniquely identify every US county. For more technical details : Federal Information Processing Standards Publications (FIPS PUBS) are issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) after approval by the Secretary of Commerce pursuant to Section 111 (d) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 as amended by the Computer Security Act of 1987, Public Law 100-235. Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 6-4, Counties and Equivalent Entities of the U.S., Its Possessions, and Associated Areas -- 90 Aug 31 , provides the names and codes that represent the counties and other entities treated as equivalent legal and/or statistical subdivisions of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the possessions and freely associated areas of the United States. Counties are considered to be the "first-order subdivisions" of each State and statistically equivalent entity, regardless of their local designations (county, parish, borough, etc.). Information gathered from census data - https://www.census.gov/geo/reference/codes/cou.html
County FIPS Codecounty_fips_codetextThe FIPS county code is a five-digit Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code (FIPS 6-4) which uniquely identifies counties and county equivalents in the United States, certain U.S. possessions, and certain freely associated states. This is the 3-digit part of the 5-digit county FIPS code specifically standing for the county.
PopulationpopulationnumberEstimated total population of the County
Population MOEpopulation_moenumberMOE number for the Population of the demographic area which in this case in the County. A Margin of Error (MOE) is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds are created by adding the MOE to the estimate and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate. All published SAHIE MOEs are based on a 90 percent confidence level.
UninsureduninsurednumberEstimated number of uninsured individuals in the County
Uninsured MOEuninsured_moenumberMargin of error number of uninsured individuals in a county
Uninsured Pctuninsured_pctnumberPercentage of the Uninsured population for each county.
Uninsured Pct MOEuninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage of uninsured Population Margin of Error
Population - Under 18 yearspopulation_under_18_yearsnumberTotal Individuals under the age of 18
Population - Under 18 years MOEpopulation_under_18_years_moenumberMargin of Error Total Population under the age of 18
Population - Under 18 years - Uninsuredpopulation_under_18_years_uninsurednumberPopulation Under the age of 18 that is uninsured
Population - Under 18 years - Uninsured MOEpopulation_under_18_years_uninsured_moenumberThe Margin of Error Population number of uninsured under the age of 18
Population - Under 18 years - Uninsured Pctpopupation_under_18_years_uninsured_pctnumberThe Percentage of Population under 18 years of age that are uninsured
Population - Under 18 years - Uninsured Pct MOEpopupation_under_18_years_uninsured_pct_moenumberThe population under 18 years of age and uninsured margin of error percentage
Population - 18 to 64 yearspopulation_18_to_64_yearsnumberTotal estimated Population 18 years of age to 64 years of age
Population - 18 to 64 years MOEpopulation_18_to_64_years_moenumberTotal Estimated population 18 years of age to 64 years of age Margin of Error
Population - 18 to 64 years - Uninsuredpopulation_18_to_64_years_uninsurednumberThe total uninsured population 18 years of age to 64 years of age
Population - 18 to 64 years - Uninsured MOEpopulation_18_to_64_years_uninsured_moenumberMargin of Error count of Uninsured Individuals that are 18 years of age to 64 years of age.
Population - 18 to 64 years - Uninsured Pctpopulation_18_to_64_years_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals that are 18 years of age to 64 years of age Average of all rows percentage at the bottom of this view
Population - 18 to 64 years - Uninsured Pct MOEpopulation_18_to_64_years_uninsured_pct_moenumberMargin of Error Percentage of uninsured individuals that are 18 years of age to 64 years of age Logical Average of all rows in this view at the bottom
Population - 65 years and olderpopulation_65_years_and_oldernumberCount of all individuals that are 65 years of age and older Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 65 years and older MOEpopulation_65_years_and_older_moenumberMargin of Error Count of all individuals that are 65 years of age and older Margin of Error Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 65 years and older - Uninsuredpopulation_65_years_and_older_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals that are 65 years of age and older Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 65 years and older - Uninsured MOEpopulation_65_years_and_older_uninsured_moenumberMargin of Error Count of uninsured individuals that are 65 years of age and older Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 65 years and older - Uninsured Pctpopulation_65_years_and_older_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals that are 65 years of age and older Average of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 65 years and older - Uninsured Pct MOEpopulation_65_years_and_older_uninsured_pct_moenumberMargin of Error Percentage of uninsured individuals that are 65 years of age and older Average of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 19 to 25 yearspopulation_19_to_25_yearsnumberCount of all individuals that are 19 years of age to 25 years of age. Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 19 to 25 years MOEpopulation_19_to_25_years_moenumberMargin of Error count of all individuals that are 19 years of age to 25 years of age. Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 19 to 25 years - Uninsuredpopulation_19_to_25_years_uninsurednumberCount of individuals that do not have insurance that are 19 years of age to 25 years of age. Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 19 to 25 years - Uninsured MOEpopulation_19_to_25_years_uninsured_moenumberMargin of Error Count of individuals that do not have insurance that are 19 years of age to 25 years of age. Margin of Error Sum of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 19 to 25 years - Uninsured Pctpopulation_19_to_25_years_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of individuals that do not have insurance that are 19 years of age to 25 years of age. Average percentage of all rows at the bottom of this view
Population - 19 to 25 years - Uninsured Pct MOEpopulation_19_to_25_years_uninsured_pct_moenumberMargin of Error Percentage of individuals that do not have insurance that are 19 years of age to 25 years of age. Margin of Error Average percentage of all rows at the bottom of this view
MalemalenumberA count of all males for this county. A sum of all males statewide at the bottom of this column.
Male MOEmale_moenumberMargin of Error count of all males in this county. A Margin of Error sum at the bottom of this column.
Male - Uninsuredmale_uninsurednumberA count of all males that do not have insurance in this county. A sum of all males that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column.
Male - Uninsured MOEmale_uninsured_moenumberMargin of Error count of all males that do not have insurance in this county. Margin of Error sum of all males that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column.
Male - Uninsured Pctmale_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of males that do not have insurance in this county. An average percentage of males that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column.
Male - Uninsured Pct MOEmale_uninsured_pct_moenumberMargin of Error percentage of males that do not have insurance in this county. Margin of Error average of males that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column.
FemalefemalenumberCount of all females in this county. Sum of all females for all counties at the bottom of this column
Female MOEfemale_moenumberMargin of Error count of all females in this county. Margin of Error sum of all females for all counties at the bottom of this column
Female - Uninsuredfemale_uninsurednumberCount of all females that do not have insurance in this county. Sum of all females that do not have insurance for all counties at the bottom of this column
Female - Uninsured MOEfemale_uninsured_moenumberMargin of Error count of females that do not have insurance in this county. Margin of Error sum of females that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column
Female - Uninsured Pctfemale_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of females that do not have insurance in this county. Average percentage of females that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column
Female - Uninsured Pct MOEfemale_uninsured_pct_moenumberMargin of Error percentage of females that do not have insurance in this county. Margin of Error average of females that do not have insurance at the bottom of this column
Race - One Racerace_one_racenumberCount of individuals who selected only one race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race MOErace_one_race_moenumberCount of individuals who selected only one race - Margin of Error count. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Uninsuredrace_one_race_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected only one race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_uninsured_moenumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected only one race - Margin of Error count. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected only one race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_uninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage of individuals who selected only one race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Whiterace_one_race_whitenumberCount of individuals who selected white race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - White MOErace_one_race_white_moenumberCount of individuals who selected white race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - White - Uninsuredrace_one_race_white_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected white race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - White - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_white_uninsured_moenumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected white race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - White - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_white_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected white race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - White - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_white_uninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected white race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Black or African Americanrace_one_race_black_or_african_americannumberCount of individuals who selected Black or African American race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Black or African American MOErace_one_race_black_or_african_american_moenumberCount of individuals who selected Black or African American race - Margin of Error count. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Black or African American - Uninsuredrace_one_race_black_or_african_american_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected Black or African American race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Black or African American - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_black_or_african_american_uninsured_moenumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected Black or African American race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Black or African American - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_black_or_african_american_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected Black or African American race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Black or African American - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_black_or_african_american_uninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected Black or African American race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Black or African American – A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - American Indian and Alaska Nativerace_one_race_american_indian_and_alaska_nativenumberCount of individuals who selected American Indian and Alaska Native race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - American Indian and Alaska Native MOErace_one_race_american_indian_and_alaska_native_moenumberCount of individuals who selected American Indian and Alaska Native race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - American Indian and Alaska Native - Uninsuredrace_one_race_american_indian_and_alaska_native_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected American Indian and Alaska Native race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - American Indian and Alaska Native - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_american_indian_and_alaska_native_uninsured_moenumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected American Indian and Alaska Native race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - American Indian and Alaska Native - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_american_indian_and_alaska_native_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected American Indian and Alaska Native race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - American Indian and Alaska Native - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_american_indian_and_alaska_native_uninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected American Indian and Alaska Native race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: American Indian or Alaska Native – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Asianrace_one_race_asiannumberCount of individuals who selected Asian as their race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Asian MOErace_one_race_asian_moenumberCount of individuals who selected Asian as their race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Asian - Uninsuredrace_one_race_asian_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected Asian as their race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Asian - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_asian_uninsured_moenumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected Asian as their race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Asian - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_asian_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected Asian as their race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Asian - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_asian_uninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage of uninsured individuals who selected Asian as their race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Asian – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanderrace_one_race_native_hawaiian_and_other_pacific_islandernumberCount of individuals who selected Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander as their race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander MOErace_one_race_native_hawaiian_and_other_pacific_islander_moenumberCount of individuals who selected Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander as their race - Margin of Error. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander - Uninsuredrace_one_race_native_hawaiian_and_other_pacific_islander_uninsurednumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander as their race. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_native_hawaiian_and_other_pacific_islander_uninsured_moenumberCount of uninsured individuals who selected Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander as their race - Margin of Error count. The U.S. Census Bureau must adhere to the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards on race and ethnicity which guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.htm
Race - One Race - Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_native_hawaiian_and_other_pacific_islander_uninsured_pctnumberUninsured Percentage of individuals that selected Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander as race. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_native_hawaiian_and_other_pacific_islander_uninsured_pct_moenumberUninsured Percentage of individuals that selected Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander as race - Margin of Error. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Some other racerace_one_race_some_other_racenumberCount of individuals that selected 1 race as 'Other'. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Some other race MOErace_one_race_some_other_race_moenumberCount of individuals that selected 1 race as 'Other' - Margin of Error. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Some other race - Uninsuredrace_one_race_some_other_race_uninsurednumberUninsured Count of individuals that selected 1 race as 'Other'. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Some other race - Uninsured MOErace_one_race_some_other_race_uninsured_moenumberUninsured count of individuals that selected 1 race as 'Other' - Margin of Error count. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Some other race - Uninsured Pctrace_one_race_some_other_race_uninsured_pctnumberUninsured Percentage of individuals that selected 1 race as 'Other'. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - One Race - Some other race - Uninsured Pct MOErace_one_race_some_other_race_uninsured_pct_moenumberUninsured Percentage of individuals that selected 1 race as Other - Margin of Error. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - Two or more racesrace_two_or_more_racesnumberCount of individuals that selected 2 or more races. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - Two or more races MOErace_two_or_more_races_moenumberCount of individuals that selected 2 or more races - Margin of Error. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - Two or more races - Uninsuredrace_two_or_more_races_uninsurednumberUninsured Count of individuals that selected 2 or more races. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - Two or more races - Uninsured MOErace_two_or_more_races_uninsured_moenumberUninsured Margin of Error count of individuals that selected 2 or more races. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - Two or more races - Uninsured Pctrace_two_or_more_races_uninsured_pctnumberUninsured Percentage of individuals that selected 2 or more races. The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
Race - Two or more races - Uninsured Pct MOErace_two_or_more_races_uninsured_pct_moenumberUninsured population Percentage Margin of Error 2 or more Races selected - The 1997 OMB standards permit the reporting of more than one race. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. An individual’s response to the race question is based upon self-identification. The Census Bureau does not tell individuals which boxes to mark or what heritage to write in. For the first time in Census 2000, individuals were presented with the option to self-identify with more than one race and this continued with the 2010 Census. People who identify with more than one race may choose to provide multiple races in response to the race question. For example, if a respondent identifies as "Asian" and "White," they may respond to the question on race by checking the appropriate boxes that describe their racial identities and/or writing in these identities on the spaces provided. What is Race? The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of individuals in the United States. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. OMB requires five minimum categories: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Reasons for collecting information on race Information on race is required for many Federal programs and is critical in making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to promote equal employment opportunities and to assess racial disparities in health and environmental risks. Contact Us For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information. More info on race - https://www.census.gov/population/race/about/faq.html
White, not Hispanic or Latinowhite_not_hispanic_or_latinonumberWhite Race is selected and no Ethnicity is selected for individuals. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
White, not Hispanic or Latino MOEwhite_not_hispanic_or_latino_moenumberWhite Race is selected and no Ethnicity is selected by individuals - Margin of Error - Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
White, not Hispanic or Latino - Uninsuredwhite_not_hispanic_or_latino_uninsurednumberWhite Race is selected and no Ethnicity is selected of the uninsured population of individuals Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
White, not Hispanic or Latino - Uninsured MOEwhite_not_hispanic_or_latino_uninsured_moenumberWhite Race is selected and no Ethnicity is selected of the uninsured Margin of Error population of individuals Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
White, not Hispanic or Latino - Uninsured Pctwhite_not_hispanic_or_latino_uninsured_pctnumberWhite Race is selected and no Ethnicity is selected of the uninsured percentage of individuals Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
White, not Hispanic or Latino - Uninsured Pct MOEwhite_not_hispanic_or_latino_uninsured_pct_moenumberWhite Race is selected and no Ethnicity is selected of the uninsured percentage of individuals - Margin of Error - Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Hispanic or Latino (of any race)hispanic_or_latino_of_any_racenumberEthnicity is selected by individuals that selected any race. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) MOEhispanic_or_latino_of_any_race_moenumberEthnicity is selected by individuals that selected any race - Margin of Error. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) - Uninsuredhispanic_or_latino_of_any_race_uninsurednumberCount of Ethnicity is selected by uninsured individuals that selected any race. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) - Uninsured MOEhispanic_or_latino_of_any_race_uninsured_moenumberEthnicity is selected by uninsured individuals that selected any race - Margin of Error count. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) - Uninsured Pcthispanic_or_latino_of_any_race_uninsured_pctnumberPercentage that Ethnicity is selected by uninsured individuals that selected any race. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) - Uninsured Pct MOEhispanic_or_latino_of_any_race_uninsured_pct_moenumberPercentage that Ethnicity is selected by uninsured individuals that selected any race - Margin of Error percentage. Hispanic or Latino Origin - Based on self-identification, a person who reports origins such as 'Mexican" "Mexican-American", "Chicano," "Puerto Rican," or " Cuban". Also included are those who indicate that they are "other Spanish," "Hispanic," or "Latino." origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or county of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the Unites States. People who identify their origin as "Spanish," " Hispanic," or " Latino" may be any race. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/censusatlas/pdf/16_Backmatter-Glossary.pdf
Household Incomehousehold_incomenumberIncome of the householder and all other individuals in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. although the household income statistics cover the calendar year preceding the census, the characteristics of the individuals and the composition of the households are as of the day of the census. (2000, 1990, 1980). The incomes of the household members 15 and older were included. (1970) The incomes of the household members 14 and older were included. Income - (2000) The sum of the amonts reported by repsondents 15 and older for wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips: self-employment incomes from own nonfarm or farm businesses: Interest, dividends, net rental, income, royalty incomes, or income from estates and trust: social security or railroad retirement incomes: Supplemental Security Income: any public assistance or welfare payments: retirement, survivor, or disability pension: and any other sources of income received regularly, such as veterans; payments, unemployment compensation, child support, or alimony. Although the income statistics cover the calendar year preceding the census, the characteristics of individuals are as of the day of the census. The income data collected in the 1990, 1980, 1970 censuses are similar to Census 2000 data, but details of the questions varied. (1970) income data were collected and presented for the population 14 and older.
Household Income MOEhousehold_income_moenumberMargin of Error - Income of the householder and all other individuals in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. although the household income statistics cover the calendar year preceding the census, the characteristics of the individuals and the composition of the households are as of the day of the census. (2000, 1990, 1980). The incomes of the household members 15 and older were included. (1970) The incomes of the household members 14 and older were included. Income - (2000) The sum of the amonts reported by repsondents 15 and older for wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips: self-employment incomes from own nonfarm or farm businesses: Interest, dividends, net rental, income, royalty incomes, or income from estates and trust: social security or railroad retirement incomes: Supplemental Security Income: any public assistance or welfare payments: retirement, survivor, or disability pension: and any other sources of income received regularly, such as veterans; payments, unemployment compensation, child support, or alimony. Although the income statistics cover the calendar year preceding the census, the characteristics of individuals are as of the day of the census. The income data collected in the 1990, 1980, 1970 censuses are similar to Census 2000 data, but details of the questions varied. (1970) income data were collected and presented for the population 14 and older.
Household Income - Uninsuredhousehold_income_uninsurednumber
Household Income - Uninsured MOEhousehold_income_uninsured_moenumber
Household Income - Uninsured Pcthousehold_income_uninsured_pctnumber
Household Income - Uninsured Pct MOEhousehold_income_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Household Income - Under $25,000household_income_under_25_000number
Household Income - Under $25,000 MOEhousehold_income_under_25_000_moenumber
Household Income - Under $25,000 - Uninsuredhousehold_income_under_25_000_uninsurednumber
Household Income - Under $25,000 - Uninsured MOEhousehold_income_under_25_000_uninsured_moenumber
Household Income - Under $25,000 - Uninsured Pcthousehold_income_under_25_000_uninsured_pctnumber
Household Income - Under $25,000 - Uninsured Pct MOEhousehold_income_under_25_000_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Household Income - $25,000 to $49,999household_income_25_000_to_49_999number
Household Income - $25,000 to $49,999 MOEhousehold_income_25_000_to_49_999_moenumber
Household Income - $25,000 to $49,999 - Uninsuredhousehold_income_25_000_to_49_999_uninsurednumber
Household Income - $25,000 to $49,999 - Uninsured MOEhousehold_income_25_000_to_49_999_uninsured_moenumber
Household Income - $25,000 to $49,999 - Uninsured Pcthousehold_income_25_000_to_49_999_uninsured_pctnumber
Household Income - $25,000 to $49,999 - Uninsured Pct MOEhousehold_income_25_000_to_49_999_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Household Income - $50,000 to $74,999household_income_50_000_to_74_999number
Household Income - $50,000 to $74,999 MOEhousehold_income_50_000_to_74_999_moenumber
Household Income - $50,000 to $74,999 - Uninsuredhousehold_income_50_000_to_74_999_uninsurednumber
Household Income - $50,000 to $74,999 - Uninsured MOEhousehold_income_50_000_to_74_999_uninsured_moenumber
Household Income - $50,000 to $74,999 - Uninsured Pcthousehold_income_50_000_to_74_999_uninsured_pctnumber
Household Income - $50,000 to $74,999 - Uninsured Pct MOEhousehold_income_50_000_to_74_999_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Household Income - $75,000 to $99,999household_income_75_000_to_99_999number
Household Income - $75,000 to $99,999 MOEhousehold_income_75_000_to_99_999_moenumber
Household Income - $75,000 to $99,999 - Uninsuredhousehold_income_75_000_to_99_999_uninsurednumber
Household Income - $75,000 to $99,999 - Uninsured MOEhousehold_income_75_000_to_99_999_uninsured_moenumber
Household Income - $75,000 to $99,999 - Uninsured Pcthousehold_income_75_000_to_99_999_uninsured_pctnumber
Household Income - $75,000 to $99,999 - Uninsured Pct MOEhousehold_income_75_000_to_99_999_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Household Income - $100,000 and overhousehold_income_100_000_and_overnumber
Household Income - $100,000 and over MOEhousehold_income_100_000_and_over_moenumber
Household Income - $100,000 and over - Uninsuredhousehold_income_100_000_and_over_uninsurednumber
Household Income - $100,000 and over - Uninsured MOEhousehold_income_100_000_and_over_uninsured_moenumber
Household Income - $100,000 and over - Uninsured Pcthousehold_income_100_000_and_over_uninsured_pctnumber
Household Income - $100,000 and over - Uninsured Pct MOEhousehold_income_100_000_and_over_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Levelratio_of_income_to_poverty_levelnumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Uninsuredratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_uninsurednumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Uninsured MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_uninsured_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Uninsured Pctratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_uninsured_pctnumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Uninsured Pct MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Under 1.38 of povertyratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_under_1_38_of_povertynumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Under 1.38 of poverty MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_under_1_38_of_poverty_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Under 1.38 of poverty - Uninsuredratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_under_1_38_of_poverty_uninsurednumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Under 1.38 of poverty - Uninsured MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_under_1_38_of_poverty_uninsured_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Under 1.38 of poverty - Uninsured Pctratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_under_1_38_of_poverty_uninsured_pctnumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - Under 1.38 of poverty - Uninsured Pct MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_under_1_38_of_poverty_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 1.38 to 1.99 of povertyratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_1_38_to_1_99_of_povertynumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 1.38 to 1.99 of poverty MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_1_38_to_1_99_of_poverty_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 1.38 to 1.99 of poverty - Uninsuredratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_1_38_to_1_99_of_poverty_uninsurednumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 1.38 to 1.99 of poverty - Uninsured MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_1_38_to_1_99_of_poverty_uninsured_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 1.38 to 1.99 of poverty - Uninsured Pctratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_1_38_to_1_99_of_poverty_uninsured_pctnumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 1.38 to 1.99 of poverty - Uninsured Pct MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_1_38_to_1_99_of_poverty_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 2.00 of poverty and overratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_2_00_of_poverty_and_overnumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 2.00 of poverty and over MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_2_00_of_poverty_and_over_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 2.00 of poverty and over - Uninsuredratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_2_00_of_poverty_and_over_uninsurednumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 2.00 of poverty and over - Uninsured MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_2_00_of_poverty_and_over_uninsured_moenumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 2.00 of poverty and over - Uninsured Pctratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_2_00_of_poverty_and_over_uninsured_pctnumber
Ratio of Income to Poverty Level - 2.00 of poverty and over - Uninsured Pct MOEratio_of_income_to_poverty_level_2_00_of_poverty_and_over_uninsured_pct_moenumber
Location 1location_1location