The median earnings of California was $31,212 in 2013.

Earnings and Gender

Earnings and Education

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Jobs and Earnings Datasets Involving California

  • API

    2013 Employee Wage Detail By Type

    data.srcity.org | Last Updated 2016-02-10T01:12:02.000Z

    2013 City of Santa Rosa employee wage data from the State of CA Controller's Office Government Compensation in California website.

  • API

    2014 Employee Wage Detail By Type

    data.srcity.org | Last Updated 2016-02-10T20:21:25.000Z

    Calendar year 2014 City of Santa Rosa employee wage data from the State of CA Controller's Office Government Compensation in California website. http://publicpay.ca.gov/Reports/Cities/City.aspx?entityid=497&fiscalyear=2014

  • API

    San Mateo Government Compensation

    data.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2015-12-20T22:18:27.000Z

    Government Compensation for County, cities and courts 2014 data from: http://publicpay.ca.gov/

  • API

    Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Authorized Vendors

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-29T04:31:57.000Z

    The Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program is a federally-funded health and nutrition program that provides assistance to pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children under age five. WIC helps California families by providing food instruments and vouchers that can be used to purchase healthy supplemental foods from over 4000 WIC-authorized vendor stores throughout the State. WIC also provides nutritional education, breastfeeding support and help finding healthcare and other community services. Participants must meet income guidelines and other criteria. Currently, 84 WIC agencies provide services monthly to over 1.45 million participants at over 650 sites in local communities throughout the State. This dataset contains the vendor name and location of all currently active vendors authorized to offer supplemental foods to participants for redemption with WIC food instruments and vouchers.

  • API

    Living Wage

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-18T20:02:03.000Z

    This table contains data on the living wage and the percent of families with incomes below the living wage for California, its counties, regions and cities/towns. Living wage is the wage needed to cover basic family expenses (basic needs budget) plus all relevant taxes; it does not include publicly provided income or housing assistance. The percent of families below the living wage was calculated using data from the Living Wage Calculator (http://livingwage.mit.edu/) and the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). The living wage is the wage or annual income that covers the cost of the bare necessities of life for a worker and his/her family. These necessities include housing, transportation, food, childcare, health care, and payment of taxes. Low income populations and non-white race/ethnic have disproportionately lower wages, poorer housing, and higher levels of food insecurity. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Food Affordability, 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-18T22:02:43.000Z

    This table contains data on the average cost of a market basket of nutritious food items relative to income for female-headed households with children, for California, its regions, counties, and cities/towns. The ratio uses data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Census Bureau. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity. An adequate, nutritious diet is a necessity at all stages of life. Inadequate diets can impair intellectual performance and have been linked to more frequent school absence and poorer educational achievement in children. Nutrition also plays a significant role in causing or preventing a number of illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, some cancers, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and anemia. At least two factors influence the affordability of food and the dietary choices of families – the cost of food and family income. The inability to afford food is a major factor in food insecurity, which has a spectrum of effects including anxiety over food sufficiency or food shortages; reduced quality or desirability of diet; and disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Key Characteristics of Californians Age 60 and Over

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-12-05T19:05:10.000Z

    This data set presents key demographic characteristics of Californians Age 60 and Over. This data set can be viewed by county or Area Agency on Aging Planning and Services Area. Key sociodemographic variables include: lives alone, low income, minority/non-minority, non-English speaking, and living in a rural area. This data is based on multiple federal and state sources.

  • API

    Housing Cost Burden, 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-21T22:14:30.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of households paying more than 30% (or 50%) of monthly household income towards housing costs for California, its regions, counties, cities/towns, and census tracts. Data is from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Consolidated Planning Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) and the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS). The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). Affordable, quality housing is central to health, conferring protection from the environment and supporting family life. Housing costs—typically the largest, single expense in a family's budget—also impact decisions that affect health. As housing consumes larger proportions of household income, families have less income for nutrition, health care, transportation, education, etc. Severe cost burdens may induce poverty—which is associated with developmental and behavioral problems in children and accelerated cognitive and physical decline in adults. Low-income families and minority communities are disproportionately affected by the lack of affordable, quality housing. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Income Inequality

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-18T19:56:44.000Z

    This table contains data on income inequality. The primary measure is the Gini index – a measure of the extent to which the distribution of income among families/households within a community deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. The index ranges from 0.0, when all families (households) have equal shares of income (implies perfect equality), to 1.0 when one family (household) has all the income and the rest have none (implies perfect inequality). Index data is provided for California and its counties, regions, and large cities/towns. The data is from the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). Income is linked to acquiring resources for healthy living. Both household income and the distribution of income across a society independently contribute to the overall health status of a community. On average Western industrialized nations with large disparities in income distribution tend to have poorer health status than similarly advanced nations with a more equitable distribution of income. Approximately 119,200 (5%) of the 2.4 million U.S. deaths in 2000 are attributable to income inequality. The pathways by which income inequality act to increase adverse health outcomes are not known with certainty, but policies that provide for a strong safety net of health and social services have been identified as potential buffers. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Urban Water Supplier Monitoring Reports

    greengov.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-06-30T21:11:08.000Z

    Monthly reports of the larger urban water suppliers in the state on water production and conservation activities