The population count of Illinois was 12,868,747 in 2014.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Illinois

  • API

    10to12 Iquery Flu Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:04:14.000Z

    The reported number of illnesses caused by strains of the Influenza virus that required the case to be in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) during a hospital stay. Influenza, commonly called "the flu," is an infection of the respiratory tract caused by the influenza virus. Compared with most viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, influenza infection often causes a more severe illness. Typical influenza illness includes fever (usually 100 degrees F to 103 degrees F in adults and often even higher in children) and respiratory symptoms, such as cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, as well as headache, muscle aches and extreme fatigue. Although nausea, vomiting and diarrhea can sometimes accompany influenza infection, especially in children, these symptoms are rarely the primary symptoms. The term "stomach flu" is a misnomer that is sometimes used to describe gastrointestinal illnesses caused by organisms other than influenza viruses. During most flu seasons, which typically run from November to April, between 10 percent and 20 percent of the population is infected with influenza viruses. Most people who get the flu recover completely in 1 to 2 weeks, but some people develop serious and potentially life-threatening medical complications, such as pneumonia. Flu-related complications can occur at any age, but the elderly and people with chronic health problems are much more likely to develop serious complications after influenza infection than are young, healthier people. Since 2010, IDPH has collected information about influenza cases that required Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization as a way to measure the severity of disease.

  • API

    05to09 Iquery Hep Cchronic Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:00:40.000Z

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States; approximately 3.2 million persons are chronically infected. HCV is most efficiently transmitted through large or repeated percutaneous exposure to infected blood (e.g., through transfusion of blood from unscreened donors or through use of injecting drugs). Although much less frequent, occupational, perinatal, and sexual exposures also can result in transmission of HCV. Because the clinical characteristics are similar for all types of acute viral hepatitis, the specific viral cause of illness cannot be determined solely on the basis of signs, symptoms, history, or current risk factors, but must be verified by specific serologic testing. Persons with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may be asymptomatic. They may have no evidence of liver disease or may have a spectrum of disease ranging from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis or liver cancer.

  • API

    05to12 Iquery Salm Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:02:36.000Z

    Salmonellosis: A case of salmonellosis is caused by one of the numerous serotypes of Salmonella bacteria, and is most often manifested by diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, and sometimes vomiting. However, asymptomatic cases may occur. A case of salmonellosis may be considered confirmed or probable. A confirmed case has been proven by laboratory testing, while a probable case is symptomatic and can be epidemiologically linked to a confirmed case. Both of these types of cases are counted in the reported case counts.

  • API

    10to12 Iquery Hep Cchronic Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:00:26.000Z

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States; approximately 3.2 million persons are chronically infected. HCV is most efficiently transmitted through large or repeated percutaneous exposure to infected blood (e.g., through transfusion of blood from unscreened donors or through use of injecting drugs). Although much less frequent, occupational, perinatal, and sexual exposures also can result in transmission of HCV. Because the clinical characteristics are similar for all types of acute viral hepatitis, the specific viral cause of illness cannot be determined solely on the basis of signs, symptoms, history, or current risk factors, but must be verified by specific serologic testing. Persons with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may be asymptomatic. They may have no evidence of liver disease or may have a spectrum of disease ranging from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis or liver cancer.

  • API

    05to12 Iquery Shig Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:01:29.000Z

    A case of shigellosis is caused by one of the four serogroups of Shigella bacteria, and is most often manifested by diarrhea, fever, nausea, and sometimes vomiting. A case of shigellosis may be considered confirmed or probable. A confirmed case has been proven by laboratory testing, while a probable case is symptomatic and can be epidemiologically linked to a confirmed case. Both of these types of cases are counted in the reported case counts.

  • API

    05to12 Iquery Crypto Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:03:45.000Z

    Cryptosporidiosis is a disease caused by ingesting or swallowing the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. Watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping are the most common major symptoms, while other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weight loss and low-grade fever. Symptoms may last as long as 30 days in otherwise healthy individuals, but in persons with weakened immune systems symptoms can persist indefinitely and possibly lead to serious illness and death. The parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is found in the feces of infected animals and people. Inadequate disposal of feces and water run-off from animal habitats may also contaminate drinking water supplies and recreational water sites.

  • API

    05to12 Iquery Histo Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:03:15.000Z

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that grows as a mold in soil, and as a yeast in humans and animals. The fungus is found in nature in soil with undisturbed droppings from birds or bats. The growth of the fungus in the soil produces very small particles that can be inhaled with dust when the soil is disturbed. A case of histoplasmosis may manifest itself as a respiratory or pulmonary illness that may be severe.

  • API

    05to12 Iquery Lyme Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:00:56.000Z

    Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics.

  • API

    05to12 Iquery Pert Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:05:23.000Z

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, is caused by infection of the respiratory tract with the Bordetella pertussis bacteria. The initial symptoms are similar to those of a common cold - a runny nose, sneezing, low-grade fever and a mild, occasional cough. The cough gradually becomes severe and, after one to two weeks, the patient has spasmodic bursts of numerous, rapid coughs. The characteristic high-pitched "whoop," which is more common in children, comes from breathing in after a coughing episode. Pertussis is highly contagious and is easily spread from person-to-person. While all ages can contract pertussis, children under one year of age are at most risk for serious complications including death.

  • API

    09to12 Iquery Chkn Pox Data

    data.illinois.gov | Last Updated 2013-11-06T15:04:29.000Z

    Varicella (Chickenpox), a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus, is one of the most commonly reported childhood diseases. Typical symptoms are fever and a generalized rash. Usually mild and not life-threatening to otherwise healthy children, it may be severe in infants, adults and persons with impaired immune systems. Individual cases of chickenpox became reportable to IDPH in 2009. The varicella-zoster virus also causes shingles in adults. After initial infection which resulted in chickenpox, the varicella-zoster virus can remain dormant for years in nerve tissue. When reactivation of latent varicella infection occurs, it results in localized pain and rash. Cases of shingles are not reportable to IDPH.