The land area of New Mexico was 121,298 in 2015.

Land Area

Water Area

Land area is a measurement providing the size, in square miles, of the land portions of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau's geographic database. Land area is based on current information in the TIGER® data base, calculated for use with Census 2010.

Water Area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau's geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a two- dimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Geographic and Area Datasets Involving New Mexico

  • API

    Water Consumption In The New York City

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2019-05-17T19:06:03.000Z

    A brief history of water consumption in the New York City Water Supply System (Based on New York City Census population)

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    Energy and Water Data Disclosure for Local Law 84 2013 (Data for Calendar Year 2012)

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2019-02-11T22:22:05.000Z

    On September 25, 2013, New York City released the 2012 energy and water use data for all properties required to annually benchmark under Local Law 84. New York City is the first in the nation to publicly disclose data for large multifamily buildings. Approximately a million New Yorkers can now see how much energy and water their apartment buildings consumed in 2012. The new data set includes more than 9,000 self-reported multifamily properties, effectively more than tripling the size of the first year's list. The data also represents the first year's results of both manual and automatic water benchmarking, with more than 6,800 properties reporting water data.

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    Citizen Statewide Lake Monitoring Assessment Program (CSLAP) Lakes

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T18:03:01.000Z

    The dataset represents the lakes participating in the Citizen Statewide Lake Monitoring Assessment Program (CSLAP). CSLAP is a volunteer lake monitoring and education program that is managed by DEC and New York State Federation of Lake Associations (NYSFOLA). The data collected through the program is used to identify water quality issues, detect seasonal and long term patterns, and inform volunteers and lake residents about water quality conditions in their lake. The program has delivered high quality data to many DEC programs for over 25 years.The dataset catalogs CSLAP lake information; including: lake name, lake depth, public accessibility, trophic status, watershed area, elevation, lake area, water quality classification, county, town, CSLAP status, years sampled, and last year sampled.

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    Energy and Water Data Disclosure for Local Law 84 2015 (Data for Calendar Year 2014)

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2018-09-10T19:26:45.000Z

    In December 2015, New York City released the 2014 energy and water use data for all properties required to annually benchmark under Local Law 84.

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    Energy and Water Data Disclosure for Local Law 84 2014 (Data for Calendar Year 2013)

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2019-02-11T22:22:29.000Z

    In September 2014, New York City released the 2013 energy and water use data for all properties required to annually benchmark under Local Law 84.

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    Elevation Benchmarks

    data.cityofchicago.org | Last Updated 2013-02-28T15:29:13.000Z

    The following dataset includes "Active Benchmarks," which are provided to facilitate the identification of City-managed standard benchmarks. Standard benchmarks are for public and private use in establishing a point in space. Note: The benchmarks are referenced to the Chicago City Datum = 0.00, (CCD = 579.88 feet above mean tide New York). The City of Chicago Department of Water Management’s (DWM) Topographic Benchmark is the source of the benchmark information contained in this online database. The information contained in the index card system was compiled by scanning the original cards, then transcribing some of this information to prepare a table and map. Over time, the DWM will contract services to field verify the data and update the index card system and this online database.This dataset was last updated September 2011. Coordinates are estimated. To view map, go to https://data.cityofchicago.org/Buildings/Elevation-Benchmarks-Map/kmt9-pg57 or for PDF map, go to http://cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/water/supp_info/Benchmarks/BMMap.pdf. Please read the Terms of Use: http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/narr/foia/data_disclaimer.html.

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    Public Fishing Rights Parking Areas

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T18:02:35.000Z

    The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) maintains a network of Public Fishing Right parking areas along trout streams in New York. This dataset represents the locations and information about those parking areas. Links to PDF maps of the actual Public Fishing Rights along the streams are available as part of the data set.

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    Gasoline Retail Prices Weekly Average by Region: Beginning 2007

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-09T22:02:43.000Z

    Gasoline retail prices weekly average by region dataset provides the weekly average retail gasoline prices for New York State and sixteen New York metropolitan regions in U.S. dollars per gallon. Data is a weekly average from October 2007 through current. Some metropolitan regions begin in 2017. Average daily retail gasoline prices are collected from the American Automobile Association (AAA) Daily Fuel Gauge Report. The AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report prices are averaged to produce a weekly average retail price for New York State and each metropolitan region. The New York State metropolitan regions in the dataset are Albany (Albany-Schenectady-Troy), Batavia, Binghamton, Buffalo (Buffalo-Niagara Falls), Dutchess (Dutchess-Putnam), Elmira, Glens Falls, Ithaca, Kingston, Nassau (Nassau-Suffolk), New York City, Rochester, Syracuse, Utica (Utica-Rome), Watertown (Watertown-Fort Drum), and White Plains.

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    Beach Lab Data

    data.cityofchicago.org | Last Updated 2019-08-23T00:00:23.000Z

    The Chicago Park District collects and analyzes water samples from beaches along Chicago’s Lake Michigan lakefront. The Chicago Park District partners with the University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Public Health Laboratory to analyze water samples using a new DNA testing method called Rapid Testing Method (qPCR analysis) which tests for Enterococci in order to monitor swimming safety. The rapid testing method (qPCR analysis) is a new method that measures levels of pathogenic DNA in beach water. Unlike the culture based test that requires up to 24 hours of processing, the new rapid testing method requires a 4-5 hours for results. The Chicago Park District can use results of the rapid test to notify the public when levels exceed UPEPA recommended levels, which is 1000* CCE. When DNA bacteria levels exceed 1000 CCE, a yellow swim advisory flag is implemented. For more information please refer to the USEPA Recreational Water Quality Criteria (http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/standards/criteria/health/recreation). Historically, the Chicago Park District used the culture based analysis method and statistical prediction models to monitor beach water quality. The culture based method tests for Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria which is an indicator species for the presence of disease-causing bacteria, viruses, and protozoans that may pose health risks to the public. This method requires 18-24 hours of processing to receive results. The Chicago Park District would use results of the culture based method to notify the public when levels exceed UPEPA recommended levels, which is 235* CFU. When bacteria levels exceed 235 CFU, a yellow swim advisory flag was implemented. This standard is still used at most beaches throughout the Great Lakes region. For more information please refer to the USEPA Recreational Water Quality Criteria. The statistical prediction model forecasted real-time Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria levels present in the water. The Chicago Park District (CPD) in partnership with the US Geological Survey, developed statistical prediction models by using weather data pulled from CPD buoys (https://data.cityofchicago.org/d/qmqz-2xku) and weather stations (https://data.cityofchicago.org/d/k7hf-8y75). The Chicago Park District would use results of the predictive model to notify the public when bacteria levels would exceed 235 CFU. When bacteria levels exceed 235 CFU, a yellow swim advisory flag was implemented. * The unit of measurement for Escherichia coli is Colony Forming Units (CFU) per 100 milliliters of water. (Culture Based Method / Statistical Prediction Model) *The unit of measuring DNA is Enterococci Calibrator Cell Equivalents (CCE) per 100 milliliters of water. (Rapid Testing Analysis)

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    EZ Pass Retailers Locations

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T17:59:03.000Z

    This data file provides the locations of authorized businesses that can sell E-Z Pass tags.