The mean job proximity index of Fairfield County, CT was 50 in 2015.

Median Jobs Proximity Index

The jobs proximity index quantifies access to employment opportunities in a region. Values are percentile ranked and range from 0 to 100, with higher values corresponding to better access to jobs. Data is computed for U.S. counties by applying summary statistics across all census tracts present in a county and is current as of 2015.

The underlying index quantifies the accessibility of a given residential neighborhood as a function of its distance to all job locations within a census tract, with distance to larger employment centers weighted more heavily. Specifically, a gravity model is used, where the accessibility (Ai) of a given residential block-group is a summary description of the distance to all job locations, with the distance from any single job location positively weighted by the size of employment (job opportunities) at that location and inversely weighted by the labor supply (competition) to that location.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development | Data Source | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Jobs and Job Proximity Datasets Involving Fairfield County, CT

  • API

    Road Traffic Injuries 2002-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:33:00.000Z

    This table contains data on the annual number of fatal and severe road traffic injuries per population and per miles traveled by transport mode, for California, its regions, counties, county divisions, cities/towns, and census tracts. Injury data is from the Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS), California Highway Patrol (CHP), 2002-2010 data from the Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS) . The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). Transportation accidents are the second leading cause of death in California for people under the age of 45 and account for an average of 4,018 deaths per year (2006-2010). Risks of injury in traffic collisions are greatest for motorcyclists, pedestrians, and bicyclists and lowest for bus and rail passengers. Minority communities bear a disproportionate share of pedestrian-car fatalities; Native American male pedestrians experience 4 times the death rate as Whites or Asians, and African-Americans and Latinos experience twice the rate as Whites or Asians. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Poverty Rate (defined by U.S. Census) by California Regions, 2000-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:33:14.000Z

    The poverty rate (US Census-defined) table contains data on the percentage of the total population living below the poverty level, percentage of children living below the poverty level, and concentrated poverty data for California, its regions, counties, cities, towns, and Census tracts. Data for multiple time periods (2000, 2005-2007, 2008-2010, and 2006-2010) and with race/ethnicity stratification is included in the table. Concentrated poverty is the percentage of the poor living in Census tracts where 40% of the population or higher, are poor. The poverty rate table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). Poverty is an important social determinant of health (see http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=39) that can impact people’s access to basic necessities (housing, food, education, jobs, and transportation), and is associated with higher incidence and prevalence of illness, and with reduced access to quality health care. More information on the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Daily Vehicle Miles Travelled By Town And Roadway Classification

    data.ct.gov | Last Updated 2014-04-04T14:41:04.000Z

    2012 VMT Data for Connecticut

  • API

    Housing Cost Burden, 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T18:09:22.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of households paying more than 30% (or 50%) of monthly household income towards housing costs for California, its regions, counties, cities/towns, and census tracts. Data is from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Consolidated Planning Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) and the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS). The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OHE/Pages/Healthy-Communities-Data-and-Indicators-Project-(HCI).aspx). Affordable, quality housing is central to health, conferring protection from the environment and supporting family life. Housing costs—typically the largest, single expense in a family's budget—also impact decisions that affect health. As housing consumes larger proportions of household income, families have less income for nutrition, health care, transportation, education, etc. Severe cost burdens may induce poverty—which is associated with developmental and behavioral problems in children and accelerated cognitive and physical decline in adults. Low-income families and minority communities are disproportionately affected by the lack of affordable, quality housing. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the Attachments.

  • API

    Educational Attainment, 2000-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T18:11:25.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of residents aged 25 years and older educational attainment (percent completing high school, associates degree, college or more advanced degree) for California, its regions, counties, cities/towns, and census tracts. Data is from the U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census and American Community Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OHE/Pages/Healthy-Communities-Data-and-Indicators-Project-(HCI).aspx). Greater educational attainment has been associated with health-promoting behaviors including consumption of fruits and vegetables and other aspects of healthy eating, engaging in regular physical activity, and refraining from excessive consumption of alcohol and from smoking. Completion of formal education (e.g., high school) is a key pathway to employment and access to healthier and higher paying jobs that can provide food, housing, transportation, health insurance, and other basic necessities for a healthy life. Education is linked with social and psychological factors, including sense of control, social standing and social support. These factors can improve health through reducing stress, influencing health-related behaviors and providing practical and emotional support. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.