The population count of White County, GA was 28,928 in 2018.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Demographics and Population Datasets Involving White County, GA

  • API

    Provisional Death Counts for Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): Weekly State-Specific Data Updates

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2020-09-23T17:13:15.000Z

    This data file contains the following indicators that can be used to illustrate potential differences in the burden of deaths due to COVID-19 according to race and ethnicity: •Count of COVID-19 deaths: Number of deaths due to COVID-19 reported for each race and Hispanic origin group •Distribution of COVID-19 deaths (%): Deaths for each group as a percent of the total number of COVID-19 deaths reported •Unweighted distribution of population (%): Population of each group as a percent of the total population •Weighted distribution of population (%): Population of each group as percent of the total population after accounting for how the race and Hispanic origin population is distributed in relation to the geographic areas impacted by COVID-19

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    Bronx Zip Population and Density

    bronx.lehman.cuny.edu | Last Updated 2012-10-21T14:06:17.000Z

    2010 Census Data on population, pop density, age and ethnicity per zip code

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    Census Demographics (2010-2014)

    data.baltimorecity.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-06T04:55:23.000Z

    Census data are frequently used throughout Vital Signs as denominators for normalizing many other indicators and rates. The socioeconomic and demographic indicators are grouped into the following categories: population, race/ethnicity, age, households, and income and poverty.

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    COVID-19 Cases and Deaths by Race/Ethnicity

    data.ct.gov | Last Updated 2020-09-24T20:10:14.000Z

    COVID-19 cases and associated deaths that have been reported among Connecticut residents, broken down by race and ethnicity. All data in this report are preliminary; data for previous dates will be updated as new reports are received and data errors are corrected. Deaths reported to the either the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) or Department of Public Health (DPH) are included in the COVID-19 update. The following data show the number of COVID-19 cases and associated deaths per 100,000 population by race and ethnicity. Crude rates represent the total cases or deaths per 100,000 people. Age-adjusted rates consider the age of the person at diagnosis or death when estimating the rate and use a standardized population to provide a fair comparison between population groups with different age distributions. Age-adjustment is important in Connecticut as the median age of among the non-Hispanic white population is 47 years, whereas it is 34 years among non-Hispanic blacks, and 29 years among Hispanics. Because most non-Hispanic white residents who died were over 75 years of age, the age-adjusted rates are lower than the unadjusted rates. In contrast, Hispanic residents who died tend to be younger than 75 years of age which results in higher age-adjusted rates. The age-adjusted rates are directly standardized using the 2018 ASRH Connecticut population estimate denominators (available here: https://portal.ct.gov/DPH/Health-Information-Systems--Reporting/Population/Annual-State--County-Population-with-Demographics). Rates are standardized to the 2000 US Millions Standard population (data available here: https://seer.cancer.gov/stdpopulations/). Standardization was done using 19 age groups (0, 1-4, 5-9, 10-14, ..., 80-84, 85 years and older). More information about direct standardization for age adjustment is available here: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt06rv.pdf Categories are mutually exclusive. The category “multiracial” includes people who answered ‘yes’ to more than one race category. Counts may not add up to total case counts as data on race and ethnicity may be missing. Age adjusted rates calculated only for groups with more than 20 deaths. Abbreviation: NH=Non-Hispanic. This dataset will be updated on a daily basis. Data are subject to future revision as reporting changes. Starting in July 2020, this dataset will be updated every weekday. Additional notes: A delay in the data pull schedule occurred on 06/23/2020. Data from 06/22/2020 was processed on 06/23/2020 at 3:30 PM. The normal data cycle resumed with the data for 06/23/2020. A network outage on 05/19/2020 resulted in a change in the data pull schedule. Data from 5/19/2020 was processed on 05/20/2020 at 12:00 PM. Data from 5/20/2020 was processed on 5/20/2020 8:30 PM. The normal data cycle resumed on 05/20/2020 with the 8:30 PM data pull. As a result of the network outage, the timestamp on the datasets on the Open Data Portal differ from the timestamp in DPH's daily PDF reports.

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    Concentrations of Protected Classes from Analysis of Impediments

    data.austintexas.gov | Last Updated 2019-07-29T17:26:04.000Z

    A new component of fair housing studies is an analysis of the opportunities residents are afforded in “racially or ethnically concentrated areas of poverty,” also called RCAPs or ECAPs. An RCAP or ECAP is a neighborhood with significant concentrations of extreme poverty and minority populations. HUD’s definition of an RCAP/ECAP is: • A Census tract that has a non‐white population of 50 percent or more AND a poverty rate of 40 percent or more; OR • A Census tract that has a non‐white population of 50 percent or more AND the poverty rate is three times the average tract poverty rate for the metro/micro area, whichever is lower. Why the 40 percent threshold? The RCAP/ECAP definition is not meant to suggest that a slightly‐lower‐than‐40 percent poverty rate is ideal or acceptable. The threshold was borne out of research that concluded a 40 percent poverty rate was the point at which a neighborhood became significantly socially and economically challenged. Conversely, research has shown that areas with up to 14 percent of poverty have no noticeable effect on community opportunity. (See Section II in City of Austin’s 2015 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice: http://www.austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/files/NHCD/Reports_Publications/1Analysis_Impediments_for_web.pdf) This dataset provides socioeconomic data on protected classes from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey on census tracts in Austin’s city limits and designates which of those tracts are considered RCAPs or ECAPs based on these socioeconomic characteristics. A map of the census tracts designated as RCAPs or ECAPs is attached to this dataset and downloadable as a pdf (see below).

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    Labor Force Status by Race and Ethnicity: Beginning 2012

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-11-27T23:01:08.000Z

    This dataset shows the population, civilian labor force, unemployed, and unemployment rate for people aged 16 years and older by race and ethnicity in New York State and its Labor Market Regions.

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    2010 Census Basic Block Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2019-04-19T19:00:33.000Z

    basic characteristics of people and housing for individual 2010 census blocks

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    2010 Census/ACS Detailed Block Group Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2013-02-08T20:10:26.000Z

    detailed characteristics of people and housing for individual 2010 census block groups

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    Hospital Inpatient Discharges (SPARCS De-Identified): 2012

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-09-13T16:29:09.000Z

    The Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) Inpatient De-Identified dataset contains discharge level detail on patient characteristics, diagnoses, treatments, services, and charges. This data contains basic record level detail regarding the discharge; however, the data does not contain protected health information (PHI) under Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). The health information is not individually identifiable; all data elements considered identifiable have been redacted. For example, the direct identifiers regarding a date have the day and month portion of the date removed.

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    Uninsured Population Census Data CY 2009-2014 Human Services

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-04-01T15:15:07.000Z

    This data is pulled from the U.S. Census website. This data is for years Calendar Years 2009-2014. Product: SAHIE File Layout Overview Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program - SAHIE Filenames: SAHIE Text and SAHIE CSV files 2009 – 2014 Source: Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program, U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date: May 2016 Description: Model‐based Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) for Counties and States File Layout and Definitions The Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program was created to develop model-based estimates of health insurance coverage for counties and states. This program builds on the work of the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) program. SAHIE is only source of single-year health insurance coverage estimates for all U.S. counties. For 2008-2014, SAHIE publishes STATE and COUNTY estimates of population with and without health insurance coverage, along with measures of uncertainty, for the full cross-classification of: •5 age categories: 0-64, 18-64, 21-64, 40-64, and 50-64 •3 sex categories: both sexes, male, and female •6 income categories: all incomes, as well as income-to-poverty ratio (IPR) categories 0-138%, 0-200%, 0-250%, 0-400%, and 138-400% of the poverty threshold •4 races/ethnicities (for states only): all races/ethnicities, White not Hispanic, Black not Hispanic, and Hispanic (any race). In addition, estimates for age category 0-18 by the income categories listed above are published. Each year’s estimates are adjusted so that, before rounding, the county estimates sum to their respective state totals and for key demographics the state estimates sum to the national ACS numbers insured and uninsured. This program is partially funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC), National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection ProgramLink to a non-federal Web site (NBCCEDP). The CDC have a congressional mandate to provide screening services for breast and cervical cancer to low-income, uninsured, and underserved women through the NBCCEDP. Most state NBCCEDP programs define low-income as 200 or 250 percent of the poverty threshold. Also included are IPR categories relevant to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2014, the ACA will help families gain access to health care by allowing Medicaid to cover families with incomes less than or equal to 138 percent of the poverty line. Families with incomes above the level needed to qualify for Medicaid, but less than or equal to 400 percent of the poverty line can receive tax credits that will help them pay for health coverage in the new health insurance exchanges. We welcome your feedback as we continue to research and improve our estimation methods. The SAHIE program's age model methodology and estimates have undergone internal U.S. Census Bureau review as well as external review. See the SAHIE Methodological Review page for more details and a summary of the comments and our response. The SAHIE program models health insurance coverage by combining survey data from several sources, including: •The American Community Survey (ACS) •Demographic population estimates •Aggregated federal tax returns •Participation records for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp program •County Business Patterns •Medicaid •Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) participation records •Census 2010 Margin of error (MOE). Some ACS products provide an MOE instead of confidence intervals. An MOE is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds can be created by adding the margin of error to the estimate (for the upper bound) and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate (for the lower bound). All published ACS margins of error are based on a 90-percent confidence level.