The population density of Fayette County, KY was 1,124 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Fayette County, KY

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    WAOFM - Census - Population and Housing, 2000 and 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:31.000Z

    Population and housing information extracted from decennial census Public Law 94-171 redistricting summary files for Washington state for years 2000 and 2010.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:39.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    United States COVID-19 Community Levels by County

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-06-30T16:19:41.000Z

    This public use dataset has 11 data elements reflecting United States COVID-19 community levels for all available counties. This dataset contains the same values used to display information available on the COVID Data Tracker at: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#county-view?list_select_state=all_states&list_select_county=all_counties&data-type=CommunityLevels The data are updated weekly. CDC looks at the combination of three metrics — new COVID-19 admissions per 100,000 population in the past 7 days, the percent of staffed inpatient beds occupied by COVID-19 patients, and total new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population in the past 7 days — to determine the COVID-19 community level. The COVID-19 community level is determined by the higher of the new admissions and inpatient beds metrics, based on the current level of new cases per 100,000 population in the past 7 days. New COVID-19 admissions and the percent of staffed inpatient beds occupied represent the current potential for strain on the health system. Data on new cases acts as an early warning indicator of potential increases in health system strain in the event of a COVID-19 surge. Using these data, the COVID-19 community level is classified as low, medium, or high. COVID-19 Community Levels can help communities and individuals make decisions based on their local context and their unique needs. Community vaccination coverage and other local information, like early alerts from surveillance, such as through wastewater or the number of emergency department visits for COVID-19, when available, can also inform decision making for health officials and individuals. See https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/community-levels.html for more information. For the most accurate and up-to-date data for any county or state, visit the relevant health department website. COVID Data Tracker may display data that differ from state and local websites. This can be due to differences in how data were collected, how metrics were calculated, or the timing of web updates. <b>Note:</b> This dataset was renamed from "United States COVID-19 Community Levels by County as Originally Posted" to "United States COVID-19 Community Levels by County" on March 31, 2022. <b>March 31, 2022:</b> Column name for county population was changed to “county_population”. No change was made to the data points previous released. <b>March 31, 2022:</b> New column, “health_service_area_population”, was added to the dataset to denote the total population in the designated Health Service Area based on 2019 Census estimate. <b>March 31, 2022:</b> FIPS codes for territories American Samoa, Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and United States Virgin Islands were re-formatted to 5-digit numeric for records released on 3/3/2022 to be consistent with other records in the dataset. <b>March 31, 2022:</b> Changes were made to the text fields in variables “county”, “state”, and “health_service_area” so the formats are consistent across releases. <b>March 31, 2022:</b> The “%” sign was removed from the text field in column “covid_inpatient_bed_utilization”. No change was made to the data. As indicated in the column description, values in this column represent the percentage of staffed inpatient beds occupied by COVID-19 patients (7-day average). <b>March 31, 2022:</b> Data values for columns, “county_population”, “health_service_area_number”, and “health_service_area” were backfilled for records released on 2/24/2022. These columns were added since the week of 3/3/2022, thus the values were previously missing for records released the week prior. <b>April 7, 2022:</b> Updates made to data released on 3/24/2022 for Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and United States Virgin Islands to correct a data mapping error. <b>May 26, 2022:</b> COVID-19 Community Level (CCL) data released for McCracken County, KY for the week of May 5, 2022 have been updated to correct

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    WAOFM - Census - Population Density by County by Decade, 1900 to 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:22.000Z

    Washington state population density by county by decade 1900 to 2010.

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    Choose Maryland: Compare Counties - Demographics

    opendata.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2019-12-13T12:53:02.000Z

    Population profile - total, rate of change, age, and density.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:41.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:45.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:42.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name Ixodes scapularis. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at a point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    Maryland Resident Population Per Square Mile: 2010-2020

    opendata.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2022-04-08T18:59:46.000Z

    Resident population density for Maryland and Jurisdictions per square mile from 2010 to 2020. Source: U.S. Bureau of Census

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    WAOFM - April 1 - Population Density by County, 2000 to Present

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-12-01T21:53:58.000Z

    Intercensal and postcensal estimates of population density by county 2000 to present.