The number of employees of Franklin County, ME was 393 for business and finance in 2018.

Occupations

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Jobs and Occupations Datasets Involving Franklin County, ME

  • API

    Vital Signs: Jobs by Industry (Location Quotient) – by county

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:19:16.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Industry (EC1) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED July 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by industry refers to both the change in employment levels by industry and the proportional mix of jobs by economic sector. This measure reflects the changing industry trends that affect our region’s workers. DATA SOURCE Bureau of Labor Statistics: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://data.bls.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.

  • API

    Vital Signs: Jobs by Industry (Location Quotient) – Bay Area

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:20:18.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Industry (EC1) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED July 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by industry refers to both the change in employment levels by industry and the proportional mix of jobs by economic sector. This measure reflects the changing industry trends that affect our region’s workers. DATA SOURCE Bureau of Labor Statistics: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://data.bls.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.

  • API

    Youth 16-19 Not In School Or Employed- ZIP Code Tabulation Areas 2010-2014

    impact.stlouisco.com | Last Updated 2016-02-17T22:31:27.000Z

    This dataset includes estimates of school enrollment and employment status for persons ages 16-19. Employed and unemployed are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey as following. Employed – This category includes all civilians 16 years old and over who either (1) were “at work,” that is, those who did any work at all during the reference week as paid employees, worked in their own business or profession, worked on their own farm, or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers on a family farm or in a family business; or (2) were “with a job but not at work,” that is, those who did not work during the reference week but had jobs or businesses from which they were temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation, or other personal reasons. Excluded from the employed are people whose only activity consisted of work around the house or unpaid volunteer work for religious, charitable, and similar organizations; also excluded are all institutionalized people and people on active duty in the United States Armed Forces. Unemployed – All civilians 16 years old and over are classified as unemployed if they (1) were neither “at work” nor “with a job but not at work” during the reference week, and (2) were actively looking for work during the last 4 weeks, and (3) were available to start a job. Also included as unemployed are civilians who did not work at all during the reference week, were waiting to be called back to a job from which they had been laid off, and were available for work except for temporary illness. Examples of job seeking activities are: • Registering at a public or private employment office • Meeting with prospective employers • Investigating possibilities for starting a professional practice or opening a business • Placing or answering advertisements • Writing letters of application • Being on a union or professional register Labor Force includes those who are employed and unemployed but does not include those who are unemployed and are not seeking to work. This dataset is for the Census bureau defined ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTA). Though roughly formed with the U.S. Postal Service’s ZIP Code areas as a guide, across the nation the ZCTAs do not always conform to the exact boundaries of ZIP Code areas. However, in St. Louis County the boundaries rarely differ.

  • API

    Vital Signs: Jobs By Industry – Bay Area

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:19:32.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Industry (EC1) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED July 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by industry refers to both the change in employment levels by industry and the proportional mix of jobs by economic sector. This measure reflects the changing industry trends that affect our region’s workers. DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/ CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.

  • API

    Vital Signs: Change in Jobs by Industry – by county

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:20:02.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Change in Jobs by Industry (EC2) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED May 2019 DESCRIPTION Change in jobs by industry is the percent change and absolute difference in the number of people who have jobs within a certain industry type in a given geographical area DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/ CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.

  • API

    Vital Signs: Jobs by Industry – by metro

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:14:15.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Industry (EC1) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED July 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by industry refers to both the change in employment levels by industry and the proportional mix of jobs by economic sector. This measure reflects the changing industry trends that affect our region’s workers. DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/ CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.

  • API

    Ethiopia Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement and Market Expansion (PRIME) Project IE--Household Information: Section 3

    data.usaid.gov | Last Updated 2018-11-11T21:30:26.000Z

    In the process of migrating data to the current DDL platform, datasets with a large number of variables required splitting into multiple spreadsheets. They should be reassembled by the user to understand the data fully. This is the third spreadsheet of three in the Ethiopia Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement and Market Expansion (PRIME) Project IE--Household Information.

  • API

    Vital Signs: Jobs By Industry – by county

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:19:46.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Industry (EC1) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED July 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by industry refers to both the change in employment levels by industry and the proportional mix of jobs by economic sector. This measure reflects the changing industry trends that affect our region’s workers. DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/ CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.

  • API

    Vital Signs: Change in Jobs by Industry – Bay Area

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:20:33.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Change in Jobs by Industry (EC2) FULL MEASURE NAME Employment by place of work by industry sector LAST UPDATED May 2019 DESCRIPTION Change in jobs by industry is the percent change and absolute difference in the number of people who have jobs within a certain industry type in a given geographical area DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department: Current Employment Statistics 1990-2017 http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/ CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The California Employment Development Department (EDD) provides estimates of employment by place of work and by industry. Industries are classified by their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Vital Signs aggregates employment into 11 industry sectors: Farm, Mining, Logging and Construction, Manufacturing, Trade, Transportation and Utilities, Information, Financial Activities, Professional and Business Services, Educational and Health Services, Leisure and Hospitality, Government, and Other. EDD counts all public-sector jobs under Government, including public transportation, public schools, and public hospitals. The Other category includes service jobs such as auto repair and hair salons and organizations such as churches and social advocacy groups. Employment in the technology sector are classified under three categories: Professional and Business Services, Information, and Manufacturing. The latter category includes electronic and computer manufacturing. For further details of typical firms found in each sector, refer to the 2012 NAICS Manual (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart=2012). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides industry estimates for non-Bay Area metro areas. Their main industry employment estimates, the Current Employment Survey and Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, do not provide annual estimates of farm employment. To be consistent, the metro comparison evaluates nonfarm employment for all metro areas, including the Bay Area. Industry shares are thus slightly different for the Bay Area between the historical trend and metro comparison sections. The location quotient (LQ) is used to evaluate level of concentration or clustering of an industry within the Bay Area and within each county of the region. A location quotient greater than 1 means there is a strong concentration for of jobs in an industry sector. For the Bay Area, the LQ is calculated as the share of the region’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the nation’s employment in that same sector. Because BLS does not provide national farm estimates, note that there is no LQ for regional farm employment. For each county, the LQ is calculated as the share of the county’s employment in a particular sector divided by the share of the region’s employment in that same sector.