The population density of Dakota County, MN was 744 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Dakota County, MN

  • API

    WAOFM - Census - Population and Housing, 2000 and 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:31.000Z

    Population and housing information extracted from decennial census Public Law 94-171 redistricting summary files for Washington state for years 2000 and 2010.

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:39.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    WAOFM - Census - Population Density by County by Decade, 1900 to 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:22.000Z

    Washington state population density by county by decade 1900 to 2010.

  • API

    Reported Crime by County Data [Archived]

    data.ramseycounty.us | Last Updated 2019-10-18T15:47:13.000Z

    Dataset showing reported crime counts and rates by offense category for Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott, and Washington counties. Crime rates are calculated using Census estimates of each county's resident population.

  • API

    City and Township Population Data

    data.ramseycounty.us | Last Updated 2022-03-21T15:37:41.000Z

    Sources: MN State Demographic Center and the Metropolitan Council. Released August 2020. The Minnesota State Demographic Center (our office) and the Metropolitan Council jointly produce population and household estimates for all years between the U.S. Census Bureau's decennial (10-year) counts.  The Met Council produces the estimates for the seven counties of Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott, and Washington, as well as all cities and townships within those counties. Our office produces the estimates for the other 80 Minnesota counties outside of the 7-county metro, as well as all cities and townships within those counties. Notes: New estimates are released annually in late July for the prior year. All data are dated to April 1. Persons per household is calculated by dividing the household population by the number of occupied households in any given geography. The household population does not equal the total population because some residents live in "group quarters" settings (such as college dormitories, nursing facilities, shelters, treatment centers, religious orders, military barracks, or correctional facilities), and thus are not living in households.  Cities that cross county boundaries are segmented by each county's portion (labeled "part"), as well as appearing in total under "Multi-County City" in the "COUNTY NAME" column.

  • API

    Choose Maryland: Compare Counties - Demographics

    opendata.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2019-12-13T12:53:02.000Z

    Population profile - total, rate of change, age, and density.

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:41.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    Rates of COVID-19 Cases or Deaths by Age Group and Vaccination Status

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-06-30T19:01:32.000Z

    Data for CDC’s COVID Data Tracker site on Rates of COVID-19 Cases and Deaths by Vaccination Status. Click 'More' for important dataset description and footnotes Webpage: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#rates-by-vaccine-status Dataset and data visualization details: These data were posted on June 17, 2022, and reflect cases among persons with a positive specimen collection date through May 21, 2022, and deaths among persons with a positive specimen collection date through April 30, 2022. These data will be updated monthly. Please note that these provisional data are subject to change. Vaccination status: A person vaccinated with a primary series had SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen detected on a respiratory specimen collected ≥14 days after verifiably completing the primary series of an FDA-authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccine. An unvaccinated person had SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen detected on a respiratory specimen and has not been verified to have received COVID-19 vaccine. Excluded were partially vaccinated people who received at least one FDA-authorized vaccine dose but did not complete a primary series ≥14 days before collection of a specimen where SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen was detected. Additional or booster dose: A person vaccinated with a primary series and an additional or booster dose had SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen detected on a respiratory specimen collected ≥14 days after receipt of an additional or booster dose of any COVID-19 vaccine on or after August 13, 2021. For people ages 18 years and older, data are graphed starting the week including September 24, 2021, when a COVID-19 booster dose was first recommended by CDC for adults 65+ years old and people in certain populations and high risk occupational and institutional settings. For people ages 12-17 years, data are graphed starting the week of December 26, 2021, 2 weeks after the first recommendation for a booster dose for adolescents ages 16-17 years. For people ages 50 years and older, data on second booster doses are graphed starting the week including March 29, 2022, when the recommendation was made for second boosters. Vertical lines represent dates when changes occurred in U.S. policy for COVID-19 vaccination (details provided above). Reporting is by primary series vaccine type rather than additional or booster dose vaccine type. The booster dose vaccine type may be different than the primary series vaccine type. ** Because data on the immune status of cases and associated deaths are unavailable, an additional dose in an immunocompromised person cannot be distinguished from a booster dose. This is a relevant consideration because vaccines can be less effective in this group. Deaths: A COVID-19–associated death occurred in a person with a documented COVID-19 diagnosis who died; health department staff reviewed to make a determination using vital records, public health investigation, or other data sources. Rates of COVID-19 deaths by vaccination status are reported based on when the patient was tested for COVID-19, not the date they died. Deaths usually occur up to 30 days after COVID-19 diagnosis. Participating jurisdictions: Currently, these 31 health departments that regularly link their case surveillance to immunization information system data are included in these incidence rate estimates: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City (New York), North Carolina, Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), Rhode Island, Seattle King County (Washington), South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia and Wisconsin; 30 jurisdictions also report deaths among vaccinated and unvaccinated people. These jurisdictions represent 70% of the total U.S. population and all ten of the Health and Human Services Regions. Data on cases among people who received additional or booste

  • API

    Voter Registration Count By Precinct And District Data

    data.ramseycounty.us | Last Updated 2022-06-10T17:44:23.000Z

    This dataset shows voter registration totals by precinct, ward and district in Ramsey County.

  • API

    [ARCHIVED] Census Population Density

    data.novascotia.ca | Last Updated 2020-01-06T15:04:30.000Z

    <b>[ARCHIVED]</b> Community Counts data is retained for archival purposes only, such as research, reference and record-keeping. This data has not been maintained or updated. Users looking for the latest information should refer to Statistics Canada’s Census Program (https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm?MM=1) for the latest data, including detailed results about Nova Scotia. This table reports population density. This data is sourced from the Census of Population. Geographies available: provinces, counties, communities, municipalities, district health authorities, community health boards, economic regions, police districts, school boards, municipal electoral districts, provincial electoral districts, federal electoral districts, regional development authorities, watersheds