The percent without health insurance of Lawrence County, PA was 10.90% for 18 to 64, all races, both sexes and all income levels in 2014.

Percent Uninsured

Percent Uninsured by Income Level

Percent Uninsured by Race

The Small Area Health Insurance Estimate (SAHIE) estimates health insurance coverage from the American Community Survey (ACS).

Above charts are based on data from the Small Area Health Insurance Estimate | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Health and Health Insurance Datasets Involving Lawrence County, PA

  • API

    Insurance Companies Licensed in Iowa

    mydata.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2019-11-08T16:09:26.000Z

    The Iowa Insurance Division regulates and supervises the business of insurance in Iowa. This dataset provides a list of insurance companies licensed to do business in Iowa.

  • API

    Drug and Alcohol Treatment Facilities May 2018 County Drug and Alcohol Programs

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-04-16T21:24:21.000Z

    This dataset reports the name, street address, city, county, zip code, telephone number, latitude, and longitude of Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs (DDAP) drug and alcohol treatment facilities in Pennsylvania as of May 2018. The primary difference between the three types of treatment facilities is their funding. Centers of Excellence (COEs) were grant funded by the Department of Human Services, PacMATs were grant funded by the Department of Health, and all other facilities are funded by either billing insurance or billing the county in the case of uninsured clients. Programmatically, COEs differ from the other types because they are designed to serve as “health homes” for individuals with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). This means that the care coordination staff at the COE is charged with coordinating all kinds of health care (physical and behavioral health) as well as recovery support services. They do this by developing hub-and-spoke networks with other healthcare providers and other sources for recovery supports, such as housing, transportation, education and training, etc. All COEs are required to accept Medicaid. PacMATs also operate in a hub-and-spoke model, but it is different from COEs. PacMATs endeavor to coordinate the provision of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) by identifying a core hub of physicians in a health system that work with other providers in the health system (spokes) to train them about the safe and effective provision of MAT so that there are more providers in a health system that are able to confidently prescribe various forms of MAT. I do not know whether all PacMATs are required to accept Medicaid as a term of their receipt of the grant, but I do know that all currently designated PacMATs are health systems that do accept Medicaid. PacMAT services have been advertised as being available to all people regardless of insurance type, so I assume this means they are required to serve Medicaid clients, commercially insured clients, and uninsured clients. In the PacMAT program the Hub is supported right now by grant funding (in the future funding such as a per patient/per month capitated rate) and the spokes bill insurance (both Medicaid and Commercial) DDAP facilities may also be designated as COEs and/or PacMATs. If they are, it means they applied for a specific grant fund and have committed to carrying out the activities of the grant described above. To be clear, DDAP does not run any treatment facilities; they license them. These can be MAT providers such as methadone clinics, providers of outpatient levels of care (i.e., more traditional drug and alcohol counseling services) or inpatient levels of care, such as residential rehabilitation programs. Every facility is different in terms of the menu of services it provides. Every facility also gets to decide what forms of payment they will accept. Many accept Medicaid, but not all do. Some only accept private commercial insurance. Some accept payment from the county on behalf of uninsured clients. And some charge their clients cash for services.

  • API

    Medical Assistance Enrollment July 2003 - Current Monthly County & Statewide Human Services

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-11-04T20:11:37.000Z

    Persons enrolled in Medical Assistance (Medicaid) for a given month. Includes Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), General Assistance (GA), Disabled, & Waiver categories.

  • API

    Vital Statistics Live Births by Primary Financial Coverage and Resident County: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-09-30T19:32:46.000Z

    This dataset contains the number of New York State live births stratified by primary financial coverage and county of residence. The data presented here may not be the same as the Vital Statistics table on the DOH public web due to data updates. For more information, go to: http://www.health.nygov/statistics/vital_statistics/. The "About" tab contains additional details concerning this dataset.

  • API

    Successful Naloxone Reversals by Law Enforcement Years 2014 - June 2018 County Drug and Alcohol Program

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2018-09-14T18:18:17.000Z

    This dataset reports number of successful naloxone reversals by police officers, as self-reported by municipal police departments, Capitol Police, and Pennsylvania State police. The data is stratified by county and by year. Note that there is no legislation mandating that law enforcement report naloxone reversals to DDAP; these data represent voluntary self-reports from departments. NA - Not applicable. No FIPS code or county code exist for Pennsylvania State Police and Capitol Police. Also, counties labelled “NA” do not have municipal police departments and are only covered by Pennsylvania State Police.

  • API

    Sample 2016 Iowa Individual Affordable Care Act-Compliant Premiums

    mydata.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-12T22:52:58.000Z

    Sample premium information for individual ACA-compliant health insurance plans available to Iowans for 2016.

  • API

    Sample 2019 Iowa Individual Affordable Care Act-Compliant Premiums

    mydata.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-12T22:38:06.000Z

    Sample premium information for individual ACA-compliant health insurance plans available to Iowans for 2019 based on age, rating area and metal level. These are premiums for individuals, not families. Please note that not every plan ID is available in every county. Please go to https://www.healthcare.gov/ to determine if your plan is available in the county you reside in.

  • API

    Plan ID Crosswalk PUF

    data.healthcare.gov | Last Updated 2017-12-11T22:46:58.000Z

    The Plan ID Crosswalk PUF (CW-PUF) is one of the seven files that make up the Marketplace PUF. The purpose of the CW-PUF is to map QHPs and SADPs offered through the Marketplaces in 2014 to plans that will be offered through the Marketplaces in 2015. These data either originate from the Plan Crosswalk template (i.e., template field), an Excel-based form used by issuers to describe their plans in the QHP application process, or were generated by CCIIO for use in data processing (i.e., system-generated).This data dictionary describes the variables contained in the CW-PUF. Each record relates to a mapping between a plan offered in 2014 and a plan offered in 2015 at the county or county-zip code level.

  • API

    Sample 2020 Iowa Individual Affordable Care Act Premiums

    mydata.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2019-09-25T18:48:16.000Z

    Explore and drill into the data using the <a href="/d/5fsw-rf5a" target="_blank" rel="nofollow external">Average 2020 Iowa Individual ACA Premiums by Rating Area, Metal Level and Age</a> chart. <br><br>Please note that not every plan ID is available in every county. Please go to <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow external">www.healthcare.gov</a> to determine if your plan is available in the county you reside in. Sample premium information for individual ACA-compliant health insurance plans available to Iowans for 2020 based on age, rating area and metal level. These are premiums for individuals, not families.

  • API

    Directory of Aging and Disability Community Resources

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T18:01:52.000Z

    This data set from NYS Office for the Aging (OFA) provides a listing of community resources to help the public find services for older and disabled New Yorkers. Included is information on: AAAs (Area Agencies on Aging), local offices that plan, develop and support comprehensive in-home and community services; HIICAPs (Health Insurance Information Counseling Program) that provide free, accurate and objective information, counseling, assistance and advocacy on Medicare, private health insurance, and related health coverage plans; LTCOP (Long Term Care Ombudsman Program) office resources and advocates for older adults and persons with disabilities who live in nursing homes, assisted living and other licensed adult care homes; and NYConnects, trusted places for information and assistance about long term services and supports whether you are paying for services yourself, through insurance, or eligible for a government program.