The percent without health insurance of Franklin County, TX was 24.00% for 18 to 64, all races, both sexes and all income levels in 2014. The percent without health insurance of McCulloch County, TX was 26.50% for 18 to 64, all races, both sexes and all income levels in 2014. The percent without health insurance of Stephens County, TX was 30.20% for 18 to 64, all races, both sexes and all income levels in 2014.

Percent Uninsured

Percent Uninsured by Income Level

Percent Uninsured by Race

The Small Area Health Insurance Estimate (SAHIE) estimates health insurance coverage from the American Community Survey (ACS).

Above charts are based on data from the Small Area Health Insurance Estimate | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Health and Health Insurance Datasets Involving McCulloch County, TX or Stephens County, TX or Franklin County, TX

  • API

    CPI 3.6 Abuse/Neglect Investigations Types of Abuse - Allegations by County and Region FY2010-FY2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:41:56.000Z

    The principal governing legislation for CPI investigations is Chapter 261 of the Texas Family Code (TFC). The TFC definitions* of abuse or neglect investigated by CPI are: Physical Abuse - Physical injury that results in substantial harm to the child, or the genuine threat of substantial harm from physical injury to the child. Sexual Abuse - Sexual conduct harmful to a child’s mental, emotional, or physical welfare. Emotional Abuse - Mental or emotional injury to a child that results in an observable and material impairment in the child’s growth, development, or psychological functioning. Neglectful Supervision - Placing the child in or failing to remove the child from a situation that a reasonable person would realize requires judgment or actions beyond the child’s level of maturity, physical condition, or mental abilities that results in bodily injury or a substantial risk of immediate harm to the child. Medical Neglect - Failing to seek, obtain, or follow through with medical care for a child, with the failure resulting in or presenting a substantial risk of death, disfigurement, or bodily injury or with the failure resulting in an observable and material impairment to the growth, development, or functioning of the child. Physical Neglect - Failure to provide the child with food, clothing, or shelter necessary to sustain the life or health of the child, excluding failure caused primarily by financial inability unless relief services had been offered and refused. Refusal to Assume Parental Responsibility - Failure by the person responsible for a child’s care, custody, or welfare to permit the child to return to the child’s home without arranging for the necessary care for the child. Abandonment - The leaving of a child in a situation where the child would be exposed to a substantial risk of physical or mental harm, without arranging for necessary care for the child. *See the full definitions in the CPS Glossary. Victims have been upduplicated by investigation stage. Visit dfps.state.tx.us for information on CPS Abuse/Neglect Investigations and all DFPS programs.

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    CPS 6.5 Purchased Services - Permanency Care Assistance by Funding Source FY2011-2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:44:49.000Z

    For children who cannot reunify and for whom adoption has been ruled out, the Permanency Care Assistance (PCA) Program provides a monthly subsidy to relatives and fictive kin that take legal custody as a permanent managing conservator and have been a verified foster care provider for the child for at least 6 months. The PCA subsidy is similar to an adoption subsidy. FOOTNOTES Does not include non-recurring payments. Note: The Permanency Care Assistance program began in Fiscal Year 2011.

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    CPI 3.4 Abuse/Neglect Investigations - Case Actions by County FY2010-FY2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:42:54.000Z

    Child Protective Investigations (CPI) conducts either a traditional investigation or Alternative Response (AR). Both require CPI to assess safety and take needed actions to protect a child and assess the risk of future abuse or neglect in the foreseeable future. AR, however, allows for a more flexible, family engaging approach on lower priority cases involving alleged victims who are age 6 or older. AR differs from traditional investigations in that there is no substantiation of allegations, no entry of perpetrators into the Central Registry (a repository for reports of child abuse and neglect), and there a heightened focus on guiding the family to plan for safety in a way that works for them and therefore sustains the safety. Completed investigations only include those cases conducted as a traditional investigation that were not administratively closed or merged into another stage. An investigation can only be administratively closed if all allegations have a disposition of administrative closure. A completed investigation can include more than one alleged victim. Completed investigations do not include any Alternative Response cases. A description of Alternative Response and how it differs from a traditional investigation is in the CPS glossary. At the end of a completed investigation, CPI assesses child safety, the risk of abuse or neglect in the foreseeable future, the ability of the family to reduce the risk without CPI intervention, the ability of CPI to provide needed services and other circumstances in the case to decide whether to provide ongoing services. The Case Action Family Substitute Care includes investigations that resulted in at least one child (not necessarily all children in the home) being removed. Does not equal number of children removed. Visit dfps.state.tx.us for information on CPS Abuse/Neglect Investigations and all DFPS programs.

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    CCI 4.2 Completed Abuse/Neglect Residential Child Care Investigations (RCCI) FY2010-FY2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:43:27.000Z

    ABOUT THIS CHART This dashboard contains information about abuse or neglect investigations that were closed by Residential Child Care Investigations staff during the specified timeframe. If at least one allegation in an investigation is validated, the overall disposition for the investigation is validated. To see a count of specific allegations, as opposed to investigations as shown here, see the RCCI Types of Abuse dashboard in this section. FOOTNOTES 1. Child Care Investigations (CCI), which is a part of CPI and includes Day Care Investigations (DCI) and Residential Child Care Investigations (RCCI), conduct investigations of abuse and neglect. After the investigation is complete, the investigation is assigned to Child Care Licensing (CCL) with HHSC, where the investigation is assessed for deficiencies of minimum standards. 2. Exemption requests are submitted to CCL to determine if their operation is subject to regulation. 3. The General Residential Operations (GROs) counts exclude Residential Treatment Centers (RTCs). Though RTCs are a “care type” of GRO, they are counted separately.

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    PEI 1.1 Youth Served During the Fiscal Year by Program FY2010-2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:45:21.000Z

    Prevention and Early Intervention (PEI) was created to consolidate child abuse prevention and juvenile delinquency prevention and early intervention programs within the jurisdiction of a single state agency. To provide services for at-risk children, youth, and families. Community Youth Development (CYD) - The CYD program contracts services in 15 targeted Texas ZIP codes with community-based organizations to develop juvenile delinquency prevention programs in areas with high juvenile crime rates. Approaches used by communities to prevent delinquency include mentoring, youth employment programs, career preparation, youth leadership development and recreational activities. Communities prioritize and fund specific prevention services according to local needs. Services to At-Risk Youth (STAR) - The STAR program contracts with community agencies to offer family crisis intervention counseling, short- term emergency respite care, individual and family counseling, and universal child abuse prevention services, ranging from local media campaigns to informational brochures and parenting classes in all counties in Texas. Youth up to age 17 and their families are eligible if they experience conflict at home, truancy or delinquency, or a youth who runs away from home. In FY2018, contracts for the STAR program were re-procured and started on December 1, 2017. Under these contracts, families could be served through traditional STAR services or through one-time focused skills training (STAR Express). In some cases, families participating in skills training also chose to enroll in traditional STAR services. Programmatically, these families are counted uniquely in both programs; for DFPS Data Book purposes, they are reported unduplicated. Statewide Youth Services Network (SYSN) - The SYSN program contracts provide community and evidence-based juvenile delinquency prevention programs focused on youth ages 10 through 17, in each DFPS region. Data as of February 17, 2020. Please visit dfps.state.tx.us to learn more about PEI and all DFPS programs.

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    DFPS Employees 1.1 Staff Demographics on August 31 by Selected Programs FY2010-2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:44:29.000Z

    The county and region of the workers are determined by the office to which they are assigned. Adult Protective Services (APS): APS Investigations employees protect people age 65 and older and adults with disabilities from abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation by investigating and providing or arranging for services necessary to alleviate or prevent further maltreatment. Child Protective Investigations (CPI/CCI): Child Care Investigations (CCI), which is a part of CPI and include Day Care Investigations (DCI) and Residential Child Care Investigations (RCCI) are only available from 2018 onward. This is due to the split of those job functions from Child Care Licensing, which was a part of DFPS until 2017, when it was transferred to the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC). Statewide Intake (SWI): Statewide Intake (SWI) serves as the “front door to the front line” for all DFPS programs. As the central point of contact for reports of abuse, neglect and exploitation of vulnerable Texans. SWI staff are available 24 hours a day, 7 days per week, 365 days per year. Prior to FY2018, all SWI staff were located in the Austin area. Visit dfps.state.tx.us for information on all DFPS programs

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    CCI 4.1 Abuse/Neglect Day Care Investigations (DCI) FY2010-2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:46:00.000Z

    This dashboard contains information about abuse/neglect related investigations that were closed by Day Care Investigations staff during the specified timeframe. FOOTNOTES 1. Child Care Investigations (CCI), which is a part of CPI and includes Day Care Investigations (DCI) and Residential Child Care Investigations (RCCI), conduct investigations of abuse and neglect. After the investigation is complete, the investigation is assigned to Child Care Licensing (CCL) with HHSC, where the investigation is assessed for deficiencies of minimum standards. 2. The number of unregulated operation investigations is calculated using the operations application date that is after the date of the intake. 3. Exemption requests are submitted to CCL to determine if their operation is subject to regulation. 4. In Fiscal Year 2011, all Licensed Child Care Centers (LCCCs) were divided into one of the following “care types”: Before and After School Program (BAP), School-Age Program (SAP), or Child Care Program (CCL). Any LCCCs with “No Care Type” after Fiscal Year 2010 are operations that were placed on adverse action prior to 09/01/2010, and a new permit was not issued for the specified care type. 5. Abuse and neglect investigations cannot be closed until they have been reviewed and approved by the appropriate CCI staff.

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    PEI 2.1 Families Served During Fiscal Year by Program FY2010-2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:44:25.000Z

    Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Programs include: Texas Families: Together and Safe (TFTS) - The TFTS program funds evidence-based, community-based programs designed to alleviate stress and promote parental competencies and behaviors that increase the ability of families to become self-sufficient and successfully nurture their children. Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (CBCAP) - CBCAP funds a variety of contracts with community-based organizations to provide child abuse and neglect prevention services. These include the Respite/Parent Education, Basic Parent Education, Fatherhood Effects, and the Home-Visiting, Education, and Leadership (HEAL) programs, as well as various special initiatives and public awareness campaigns. Community Based Family Services (CBFS) - The CBFS program serves families who were investigated by CPS but whose allegations were low-priority or unsubstantiated, through community and evidence-based services. Services include home visitation, case management, and additional social services to provide a safe and stable home environment. Helping through Intervention and Prevention (HIP) - The HIP program provides an extensive family assessment, home visiting that includes parent education and basic needs support to targeted families. Healthy Outcomes through Prevention and Early Support (HOPES) - The HOPES program provides child abuse and neglect prevention services that target families with children between 0-5 years of age. Contracts have been awarded in eight counties. Each HOPES contract also has a focus on community collaboration that focus on early childhood and the prevention of child abuse and neglect. Family Strengthening (FSP) and Tertiary Child Abuse Prevention Programs (TPP) - Served families through 2011. Military Families Program (MFVPP) - FOOTNOTES Families served are counted by primary caregivers' participation in child abuse/neglect prevention programs. Data as of February 17, 2020. Please visit dfps.state.tx.us to learn more about PEI and all DFPS programs.

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    CPS 5.1 Youth in Subsitute Care - Youth Eligible for PAL Services FY2010-2019

    data.texas.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-26T23:45:07.000Z

    The Transitional Living Services Program includes the Preparation for Adult Living (PAL) program, Education and Training Voucher (ETV) program and other services and supports to help youth transition from foster care to a successful adulthood. PAL services ensure that youth in DFPS foster care and those transitioning from foster care to a successful adulthood receive the tools, resources, supports, and personal and community connections they need to become self-sufficient adults. PAL supportive services and benefits are provided to eligible youth and young adults ages 16 to 21. 14-15 year old youth in the Permanent Managing Conservatorship (PMC) of DFPS will receive a life skills assessment. All other youth age 14 and 15 can be served, if funding or resources are available. The ETV program can assist youth and young adults ages 16-23. ETV services can be provided to eligible youth and young adults for 5 years or 15 semesters up to their 23rd birthday. Visit dfps.state.tx.us for information on the Preparation for Adult Living (PAL) program and all DFPS programs.