The population density of Outagamie County, WI was 290 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Outagamie County, WI

  • API

    WAOFM - Census - Population and Housing, 2000 and 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:31.000Z

    Population and housing information extracted from decennial census Public Law 94-171 redistricting summary files for Washington state for years 2000 and 2010.

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    WAOFM - Census - Population Density by County by Decade, 1900 to 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:22.000Z

    Washington state population density by county by decade 1900 to 2010.

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    Choose Maryland: Compare Counties - Demographics

    opendata.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2019-12-13T12:53:02.000Z

    Population profile - total, rate of change, age, and density.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:41.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:39.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    2012 Health Outcomes And Factors Rankings

    data.colorado.gov | Last Updated 2015-01-07T16:30:50.000Z

    This dataset ranks Colorado counties by health outcomes and factors for the year 2012.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:42.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name Ixodes scapularis. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at a point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    Internet Master Plan: Adoption and Infrastructure Data by Neighborhood

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2021-09-17T20:27:34.000Z

    Key indicators of broadband adoption, service and infrastructure in New York City.</p> <b>Data Limitations:</b> Data accuracy is limited as of the date of publication and by the methodology and accuracy of the original sources. The City shall not be liable for any costs related to, or in reliance of, the data contained in these datasets.

  • API

    Rates of COVID-19 Cases or Deaths by Age Group and Vaccination Status

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-04-15T16:37:46.000Z

    Data for CDC’s COVID Data Tracker site on Rates of COVID-19 Cases and Deaths by Vaccination Status. Click 'More' for important dataset description and footnotes Webpage: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#rates-by-vaccine-status Dataset and data visualization details: These data were posted on April 15, 2022, and reflect cases among persons with a positive specimen collection date through March 19, 2022, and deaths among persons with a positive specimen collection date through February 26, 2022. These data will be updated monthly. Please note that these provisional data are subject to change. Vaccination status: A person vaccinated with a primary series had SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen detected on a respiratory specimen collected ≥14 days after verifiably completing the primary series of an FDA-authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccine. An unvaccinated person had SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen detected on a respiratory specimen and has not been verified to have received COVID-19 vaccine. Excluded were partially vaccinated people who received at least one FDA-authorized vaccine dose but did not complete a primary series ≥14 days before collection of a specimen where SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen was detected. Additional or booster dose: A person vaccinated with a primary series and an additional or booster dose had SARS-CoV-2 RNA or antigen detected on a respiratory specimen collected ≥14 days after receipt of an additional or booster dose of any COVID-19 vaccine on or after August 13, 2021. For people ages 18 years and older, data are graphed starting the week including September 24, 2021, when a COVID-19 booster dose was first recommended by CDC for adults 65+ years old and people in certain populations and high risk occupational and institutional settings. For people ages 12-17 years, data are graphed starting the week of December 26, 2021, 2 weeks after the first recommendation for a booster dose for adolescents ages 16-17 years. Vertical lines represent dates when changes occurred in U.S. policy for COVID-19 vaccination (details provided above). Reporting is by primary series vaccine type rather than additional or booster dose vaccine type. The booster dose vaccine type may be different than the primary series vaccine type. ** Because data on the immune status of cases and associated deaths are unavailable, an additional dose in an immunocompromised person cannot be distinguished from a booster dose. This is a relevant consideration because vaccines can be less effective in this group. Deaths: A COVID-19–associated death occurred in a person with a documented COVID-19 diagnosis who died; health department staff reviewed to make a determination using vital records, public health investigation, or other data sources. Rates of COVID-19 deaths by vaccination status are reported based on when the patient was tested for COVID-19, not the date they died. Deaths usually occur up to 30 days after COVID-19 diagnosis. Participating jurisdictions: Currently, these 27 health departments that regularly link their case surveillance to immunization information system data are included in these incidence rate estimates: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, New York City (New York), North Carolina, Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), Rhode Island, Seattle King County (Washington), Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; 25 jurisdictions also report deaths among vaccinated and unvaccinated people. These jurisdictions represent 66% of the total U.S. population and all ten of the Health and Human Services Regions. Data on cases and deaths including people who received additional or booster doses were reported from 24 jurisdictions; 23 jurisdictions also reported data on deaths among people who received additional or booster doses. This list will be updated as more jurisdictions participate. Incide

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2022-03-23T14:44:45.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.