The land area of Anniston, AL was 46 in 2018.

Land Area

Water Area

Land area is a measurement providing the size, in square miles, of the land portions of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau's geographic database. Land area is based on current information in the TIGER® data base, calculated for use with Census 2010.

Water Area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau's geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a two- dimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Geographic and Area Datasets Involving Anniston, AL

  • API

    Rockfish Recruitment and Ecosystem Assessment Survey, Catch Data

    noaa-fisheries-swfsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2020-03-12T16:08:05.000Z

    The Fisheries Ecology Division (FED, https://swfsc.noaa.gov/GroundfishAnalysis/) of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) has conducted a midwater trawl survey off central California since 1983 with the primary goal of developing pre-recruit indices for young-of-the-year (YOY) rockfish (Sebastes spp.). The survey also samples numerous other components of the epipelagic micronekton, including other YOY groundfish (such as Pacific hake, Merluccius productus, and sanddab, Citharichthys spp ), coastal pelagic fishes (such as Pacific sardine, Sardinops sagax, and northern anchovy, Engraulis mordax) and other forage species. Additional details regarding the survey methods and results are described in Ralston et al. (2015) and Sakuma et al. (http://calcofi.org/publications/calcofireports/v57/Vol57-Sakuma_pages.163-183.pdf). Ralston, S., J.C. Field and K.S. Sakuma. 2015. Longterm variation in a central California pelagic forage assemblage. Journal of Marine Systems 146: 26-37. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2014.06.013. Sakuma, K.M., J.C. Field, B.B. Marinovic, C.N. Carrion, N.J. Mantua and S. Ralston. In revision. Anomalous epipelagic micronekton assemblage patterns in the neritic waters of the California Current in spring 2015 during a period of extreme ocean conditions. CalCOFI Reports.

  • API

    Streets – Active and Retired

    data.sfgov.org | Last Updated 2022-01-20T03:01:15.000Z

    Street Centerlines, active and retired. Note: The Class Code field is used for symbolization: 1 = Freeway 2 = Major street/Highway 3 = Arterial street 4 = Collector Street 5 = Residential Street 6 = Freeway Ramp 0 = Other (private streets, paper street, etc.)

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    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:49:45.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    Tsunami Evacuation Planning (2009)

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2021-02-05T23:53:49.000Z

    The potential tsunami inundation areas data has been compiled with best currently available scientific information. The inundation line represents the maximum considered tsunami run-up from a number of extreme, yet realistic, tsunami sources. Tsunamis are rare events; due to a lack of known occurrences in the historical record, this data includes no information about the probability of any tsunami affecting any area within a specific period of time. Initial tsunami modeling was performed by the University of Southern California (USC) Tsunami Research Center funded through the California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The tsunami modeling process utilized the MOST (Method of Splitting Tsunamis) computational program (Version 0), which allows for wave evolution over a variable bathymetry and topography used for the inundation mapping (Titov and Gonzalez, 1997; Titov and Synolakis, 1998). The bathymetric/topographic data that were used in the tsunami models consist of a series of nested grids. Near-shore grids with a 3 arc-second (75- to 90-meters) resolution or higher, were adjusted to "Mean High Water" sea-level conditions, representing a conservative sea level for the intended use of the tsunami modeling and mapping. A suite of tsunami source events was selected for modeling, representing realistic local and distant earthquakes and hypothetical extreme undersea, near-shore landslides. Local tsunami sources that were considered include offshore reverse-thrust faults, restraining bends on strike-slip fault zones and large submarine landslides capable of significant seafloor displacement and tsunami generation. Distant tsunami sources that were considered include great subduction zone events that are known to have occurred historically (1960 Chile and 1964 Alaska earthquakes) and others which can occur around the Pacific Ocean "Ring of Fire." In order to enhance the result from the 75- to 90-meter inundation grid data, a method was developed utilizing higher-resolution digital topographic data (3- to 10-meters resolution) that better defines the location of the maximum inundation line (U.S. Geological Survey, 1993; Intermap, 2003; NOAA, 2004). The location of the enhanced inundation line was determined by using digital imagery and terrain data on a GIS platform with consideration given to historic inundation information (Lander, et al., 1993). This information was verified, where possible, by field work coordinated with local county personnel. The accuracy of the inundation line represented by this data is subject to limitations in the accuracy and completeness of available terrain and tsunami source information, and the current understanding of tsunami generation and propagation phenomena as expressed in the models. Thus, although an attempt has been made to identify a credible upper bound to inundation at any location along the coastline, it remains possible that actual inundation could be greater in a major tsunami event. This data does not represent inundation from a single scenario event. It was created by combining inundation results for an ensemble of source events affecting a given region. For this reason, all of the inundation region in a particular area will not likely be inundated during a single tsunami event. The potential tsunami inundation areas data, and the information presented herein, is not a legal document and does not meet disclosure requirements for real estate transactions nor for any other regulatory purpose.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:50:14.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:49:00.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:49:31.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:49:58.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:49:13.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Marine Debris Surveys by Location in Alaska_ 1972-2015 Summarized

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2021-04-22T19:19:56.000Z

    Scientists at the Auke Bay Laboratory have conducted marine debris surveys on select beaches in Alaska periodically since 1972. Some of the beaches previously sampled have been identified as marine debris hot spots due to their increased debris accumulation. At each location, multiple 1 km beach segments were sampled by people walking the beach and enumerating all anthropogenic marine debris found. The beach area surveyed was from the waters edge up to the base of the storm berm or log piles. Individual beach segments have been walked multiple times in the since 1972 allowing for a direct comparison with prior years. Sampling occurred in late spring and summer to test the hypothesis of change in marine debris sources due to increased summer boat traffic and the diminished occurrence and severity of storms.