The population count of Center Point, AL was 16,460 in 2018.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Center Point, AL

  • API

    Indicators of Anxiety or Depression Based on Reported Frequency of Symptoms During Last 7 Days

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-07-20T14:32:24.000Z

    The U.S. Census Bureau, in collaboration with five federal agencies, launched the Household Pulse Survey to produce data on the social and economic impacts of Covid-19 on American households. The Household Pulse Survey was designed to gauge the impact of the pandemic on employment status, consumer spending, food security, housing, education disruptions, and dimensions of physical and mental wellness. The survey was designed to meet the goal of accurate and timely weekly estimates. It was conducted by an internet questionnaire, with invitations to participate sent by email and text message. The sample frame is the Census Bureau Master Address File Data. Housing units linked to one or more email addresses or cell phone numbers were randomly selected to participate, and one respondent from each housing unit was selected to respond for him or herself. Estimates are weighted to adjust for nonresponse and to match Census Bureau estimates of the population by age, gender, race and ethnicity, and educational attainment. All estimates shown meet the NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions,

  • API

    Mental Health Care in the Last 4 Weeks

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-05-18T14:15:41.000Z

    The U.S. Census Bureau, in collaboration with five federal agencies, launched the Household Pulse Survey to produce data on the social and economic impacts of Covid-19 on American households. The Household Pulse Survey was designed to gauge the impact of the pandemic on employment status, consumer spending, food security, housing, education disruptions, and dimensions of physical and mental wellness. The survey was designed to meet the goal of accurate and timely weekly estimates. It was conducted by an internet questionnaire, with invitations to participate sent by email and text message. The sample frame is the Census Bureau Master Address File Data. Housing units linked to one or more email addresses or cell phone numbers were randomly selected to participate, and one respondent from each housing unit was selected to respond for him or herself. Estimates are weighted to adjust for nonresponse and to match Census Bureau estimates of the population by age, gender, race and ethnicity, and educational attainment. All estimates shown meet the NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions.

  • API

    Social Vulnerability Index for Virginia by Census Tract, 2018

    data.virginia.gov | Last Updated 2021-10-07T19:02:27.000Z

    "ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking." For more see https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/placeandhealth/svi/documentation/SVI_documentation_2018.html

  • API

    Population Health Measures: Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates

    data.montgomerycountymd.gov | Last Updated 2022-08-01T19:53:57.000Z

    Age-adjustment mortality rates are rates of deaths that are computed using a statistical method to create a metric based on the true death rate so that it can be compared over time for a single population (i.e. comparing 2006-2008 to 2010-2012), as well as enable comparisons across different populations with possibly different age distributions in their populations (i.e. comparing Hispanic residents to Asian residents). Age adjustment methods applied to Montgomery County rates are consistent with US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) as well as Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Vital Statistics Administration (DHMH VSA). PHS Planning and Epidemiology receives an annual data file of Montgomery County resident deaths registered with Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Vital Statistics Administration (DHMH VSA). Using SAS analytic software, MCDHHS standardizes, aggregates, and calculates age-adjusted rates for each of the leading causes of death category consistent with state and national methods and by subgroups based on age, gender, race, and ethnicity combinations. Data are released in compliance with Data Use Agreements between DHMH VSA and MCDHHS. This dataset will be updated Annually.

  • API

    Indicators of Reduced Access to Care Due to the Coronavirus Pandemic During Last 4 Weeks

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-04-01T18:36:19.000Z

    The U.S. Census Bureau, in collaboration with five federal agencies, launched the Household Pulse Survey to produce data on the social and economic impacts of Covid-19 on American households. The Household Pulse Survey was designed to gauge the impact of the pandemic on employment status, consumer spending, food security, housing, education disruptions, and dimensions of physical and mental wellness. The survey was designed to meet the goal of accurate and timely weekly estimates. It was conducted by an internet questionnaire, with invitations to participate sent by email and text message. The sample frame is the Census Bureau Master Address File Data. Housing units linked to one or more email addresses or cell phone numbers were randomly selected to participate, and one respondent from each housing unit was selected to respond for him or herself. Estimates are weighted to adjust for nonresponse and to match Census Bureau estimates of the population by age, gender, race and ethnicity, and educational attainment. All estimates shown meet the NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions.

  • API

    Vaccine Hesitancy for COVID-19: County and local estimates

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2021-06-17T20:27:47.000Z

    Due to the change in the survey instrument regarding intention to vaccinate, our estimates for “hesitant or unsure” or “hesitant” derived from April 14-26, 2021, are not directly comparable with prior Household Pulse Survey data and should not be used to examine trends in hesitancy. To support state and local communication and outreach efforts, ASPE developed state, county, and sub-state level predictions of hesitancy rates (https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/vaccine-hesitancy) using the most recently available federal survey data. We estimate hesitancy rates at the state level using the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey (HPS) (https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/household-pulse-survey.html) data and utilize the estimated values to predict hesitancy rates at the Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMA) level using the Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey (ACS) 1-year Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS)(https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/microdata.html). To create county-level estimates, we used a PUMA-to-county crosswalk from the Missouri Census Data Center(https://mcdc.missouri.edu/applications/geocorr2014.html). PUMAs spanning multiple counties had their estimates apportioned across those counties based on overall 2010 Census populations. The HPS is nationally representative and includes information on U.S. residents’ intentions to receive the COVID-19 vaccine when available, as well as other sociodemographic and geographic (state, region and metropolitan statistical areas) information. The ACS is a nationally representative survey, and it provides key sociodemographic and geographic (state, region, PUMAs, county) information. We utilized data for the survey collection period May 26, 2021 – June 7, 2021, which the HPS refers to as Week 31.. PUMA COVID-19 Hesitancy Data - https://data.cdc.gov/Vaccinations/Vaccine-Hesitancy-for-COVID-19-Public-Use-Microdat/djj9-kh3p

  • API

    Indicators of Health Insurance Coverage at the Time of Interview

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-07-20T14:32:34.000Z

    The U.S. Census Bureau, in collaboration with five federal agencies, launched the Household Pulse Survey to produce data on the social and economic impacts of Covid-19 on American households. The Household Pulse Survey was designed to gauge the impact of the pandemic on employment status, consumer spending, food security, housing, education disruptions, and dimensions of physical and mental wellness. The survey was designed to meet the goal of accurate and timely weekly estimates. It was conducted by an internet questionnaire, with invitations to participate sent by email and text message. The sample frame is the Census Bureau Master Address File Data. Housing units linked to one or more email addresses or cell phone numbers were randomly selected to participate, and one respondent from each housing unit was selected to respond for him or herself. Estimates are weighted to adjust for nonresponse and to match Census Bureau estimates of the population by age, gender, race and ethnicity, and educational attainment. All estimates shown meet the NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions.

  • API

    Social Vulnerability Index 2018 - United States, tract

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-02-14T14:22:44.000Z

    ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking. In addition to tract-level rankings, SVI 2018 also has corresponding rankings at the county level. Notes below that describe “tract” methods also refer to county methods.

  • API

    Social Vulnerability Index 2018 - United States, county

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2022-02-14T14:19:58.000Z

    ATSDR’s Geospatial Research, Analysis & Services Program (GRASP) created Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index (CDC SVI or simply SVI, hereafter) to help public health officials and emergency response planners identify and map the communities that will most likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. SVI indicates the relative vulnerability of every U.S. Census tract. Census tracts are subdivisions of counties for which the Census collects statistical data. SVI ranks the tracts on 15 social factors, including unemployment, minority status, and disability, and further groups them into four related themes. Thus, each tract receives a ranking for each Census variable and for each of the four themes, as well as an overall ranking. In addition to tract-level rankings, SVI 2018 also has corresponding rankings at the county level. Notes below that describe “tract” methods also refer to county methods.

  • API

    Workforce Demographic Characteristics by Commuting Mode Split : 2012 - 2016

    data.cambridgema.gov | Last Updated 2022-02-01T14:15:35.000Z

    This data set provides demographic and journey to work characteristics of the Cambridge Workforce by primary mode of their journey to work. Attributes include age, presence of children, racial and ethnic minority status, vehicles available, time arriving at work, time spent traveling, and annual household income. The data set originates from a special tabulation of the American Community Survey - the 2012 - 2016 version of the Census Transportation Planning Products (CTPP). The Cambridge Workforce consist of all persons who work in Cambridge, regardless of home location. For more information on Journey to Work data in Cambridge, please see the report Moving Forward: 2020 - https://www.cambridgema.gov/-/media/Files/CDD/FactsandMaps/profiles/demo_moving_forward_2020.pdf