The population density of Fishhook, AK was 86 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Fishhook, AK

  • API

    NCHS - Teen Birth Rates for Females by Age Group, Race, and Hispanic Origin: United States

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-05T17:24:48.000Z

    This dataset includes teen birth rates for females by age group, race, and Hispanic origin in the United States since 1960. Data availability varies by race and ethnicity groups. All birth data by race before 1980 are based on race of the child. Since 1980, birth data by race are based on race of the mother. For race, data are available for Black and White births since 1960, and for American Indians/Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander births since 1980. Data on Hispanic origin are available since 1989. Teen birth rates for specific racial and ethnic categories are also available since 1989. From 2003 through 2015, the birth data by race were based on the “bridged” race categories (5). Starting in 2016, the race categories for reporting birth data changed; the new race and Hispanic origin categories are: Non-Hispanic, Single Race White; Non-Hispanic, Single Race Black; Non-Hispanic, Single Race American Indian/Alaska Native; Non-Hispanic, Single Race Asian; and, Non-Hispanic, Single Race Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (5,6). Birth data by the prior, “bridged” race (and Hispanic origin) categories are included through 2018 for comparison. National data on births by Hispanic origin exclude data for Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma in 1989; New Hampshire and Oklahoma in 1990; and New Hampshire in 1991 and 1992. Birth and fertility rates for the Central and South American population includes other and unknown Hispanic. Information on reporting Hispanic origin is detailed in the Technical Appendix for the 1999 public-use natality data file (see ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Dataset_Documentation/DVS/natality/Nat1999doc.pdf). SOURCES NCHS, National Vital Statistics System, birth data (see https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/births.htm); public-use data files (see https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/VitalStatsOnline.htm); and CDC WONDER (see http://wonder.cdc.gov/). REFERENCES 1. National Office of Vital Statistics. Vital Statistics of the United States, 1950, Volume I. 1954. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/vsus/vsus_1950_1.pdf. 2. Hetzel AM. U.S. vital statistics system: major activities and developments, 1950-95. National Center for Health Statistics. 1997. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/usvss.pdf. 3. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Statistics of the United States, 1967, Volume I–Natality. 1969. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/vsus/nat67_1.pdf. 4. Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, et al. Births: Final data for 2015. National vital statistics reports; vol 66 no 1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2017. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf. 5. Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, Driscoll AK, Drake P. Births: Final data for 2016. National Vital Statistics Reports; vol 67 no 1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2018. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_01.pdf. 6. Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, Driscoll AK, Births: Final data for 2018. National vital statistics reports; vol 68 no 13. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2019. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr68/nvsr68_13.pdf.

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    AFSC/ABL: 1996 Brood year Steelhead growth and early life-history transitions

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:57:22.000Z

    Heritabilities of growth, precocious maturation and smolting were measured in 75 families of juvenile steelhead or rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, progeny of within and between line matings (crosses) of wild, anadromous steelhead and wild, resident (lake) rainbow trout originally derived from the same anadromous stock 70 years earlier. The tagged yearling progeny were combined by line in common freshwater rearing containers and graded into three categories: mature, smolt or rearing (undifferentiated) at age 2 years. Heritabilities of precocious male maturity, smolting and growth were moderate to high, and the genetic correlation between growth and smolting was low. Smolting and precocious male maturity were highly variable among families within lines and significantly different between lines. Each of the four lines produced significant numbers of smolts at age two. Smolting and maturation were negatively genetically correlated, which may explain the persistence of smolting in the lake population despite strong selection against lake smolts; balancing selection on male maturation age may help to maintain variation for smolting. The high heritability of smolting, coupled with the inability of smolts that leave the lake to return to it indicates that the genetic potential for smolting can lie dormant or be maintained through a dynamic interaction between smolting and early maturation for decades despite complete selection against the phenotype. The results have significant implications for the preservation of threatened anadromous stocks in fresh water and the inclusion of resident fish of formerly anadromous populations, currently trapped behind long-standing barriers to migration, as one component of the same population.

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    AFSC/ABL: Sockeye salmon allozyme baseline - 1982-1990

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:56:56.000Z

    Genetic data were collected and prepared with the use of protein electrophoresis from 52 spawning locations in southeastern Alaska and northern British Columbia. Genetic relationships were examined from principal components analysis and unrooted trees constructed from genetic distances between collections. These descriptive analyses suggest a geographic basis to genetic divergence among populations. This geographic basis was confirmed using log-likelihood-ratio analysis and analyses of variance. Three groups of populations were observed: one from systems that drain into the inside waters of northern and central southeast Alaska; another from the far southeastern islands (including Prince of Wales Island); and the third in systems of the southern inside waters. Although the geographic structure was a statistically significant component of the overall genetic structure, gene diversity analysis indicates that only about 4.7% of the total genetic variability was attributable to genetic differences among those regions, whereas about 8.4% of the total was due to differences among populations within each region. The other 87.0% of the variation occurred, on average, within each collection.

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    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Daly:Juvenile blue king crab cannibalism experiment conducted in the Kodiak Lab in 2014

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2018-02-28T20:08:53.000Z

    This dataset is part of a laboratory experiment, which evaluated how varying prey densities (year-0 blue king crabs) and habitat type (shell and sand) affect the functional response of year-1 blue king crabs, crypsis of prey crabs, and foraging behavior of predator crabs. The data includes date, experimental duration, tank number, predator species, prey species, predator size, substrate type, initial and final prey densities, number of prey eaten, crypsis indices, survival, and time spent foraging.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Embryonic development of quillback rockfish

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:54:21.000Z

    Maternal effects on the quality of progeny can have direct impacts on population productivity. Rockfish are viviparous and the oil globule size of larvae at parturition has been shown to have direct effects on time until starvation and growth rate. We sampled embryos and preparturition larvae opportunistically from 89 gravid quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) in Southeast Alaska. Because the developmental stage and sampling period were correlated with oil globule size, they were treated as covariates in an analysis of maternal age, length, and weight effects on oil globule size. Maternal factors were related to developmental timing for almost all sampling periods, indicating that older, longer, and heavier females develop embryos earlier than younger, shorter, or lighter ones. Oil globule diameter and maternal length and weight were statistically linked, but the relationships may not be biologically significant. Weight-specific fecundity did not increase with maternal size or age, suggesting that reproductive output does not increase more quickly as fish age and grow. Age or size truncation of a rockfish population, in which timing of parturition is related to age and size, could result in a shorter parturition season. This shortening of the parturition season could make the population vulnerable to f luctuating environmental conditions.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Sockeye salmon allozyme baseline - 1982-1990

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:57:07.000Z

    Genetic data were collected and prepared with the use of protein electrophoresis from 52 spawning locations in southeastern Alaska and northern British Columbia. Genetic relationships were examined from principal components analysis and unrooted trees constructed from genetic distances between collections. These descriptive analyses suggest a geographic basis to genetic divergence among populations. This geographic basis was confirmed using log-likelihood-ratio analysis and analyses of variance. Three groups of populations were observed: one from systems that drain into the inside waters of northern and central southeast Alaska; another from the far southeastern islands (including Prince of Wales Island); and the third in systems of the southern inside waters. Although the geographic structure was a statistically significant component of the overall genetic structure, gene diversity analysis indicates that only about 4.7% of the total genetic variability was attributable to genetic differences among those regions, whereas about 8.4% of the total was due to differences among populations within each region. The other 87.0% of the variation occurred, on average, within each collection.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Chinook allozyme baseline

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:55:59.000Z

    Allozyme variation was used to examine population genetic structure of adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, collected between 1988 and 1993 from 22 spawning locations in Southeast Alaska and northern British Columbia. Thirty-five loci and two pairs of isoloci were variable, and of these, 25 loci and one pair of isoloci expressed the most abundant allele with a frequency of less than or equal to 0.95 in at least one collection. Aneighbor-joining (NJ) tree of genetic distances defined five regional groups: (1) King Salmon River (the only island collection), which has large allelic frequency differences from other populations in this study; (2) heterogeneous coastal populations from southern southeast Alaska; (3) transmountain collections from the Taku and Stikine Rivers on the eastern side of the coastal mountain range; (4) Chilkat River in northern Southeast Alaska; and (5) northern coastal Southeast Alaska, which consists of the Situk River and the Klukshu River, a tributary of the Alsek River. A second NJ tree that included collections from the Yukon River and British Columbia did not reveal any strong genetic similarity between Southeast Alaska and the Yukon River. The data suggest that Southeast Alaska may have been colonized from both northern and southern refugia following the last glaciation b?? a period of sufficient time to allow for isolation by distance to occur.

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    AFSC/ABL: Salisbury Sound sponge recovery

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:57:33.000Z

    In 1995, an area of the seafloor near Salisbury Sound was trawled to identify immediate effects on large, erect sponges and sea whips. Video transects were made in the trawled areas, as well as in reference areas with a manned submersible. One year later, the video transects were repeated to characterize medium-term survival and recovery of the sponges and sea whips. In 2009, the site was revisted to document the long-term effects of trawling. Thirteen years after trawling, the incidence of damage to sponges and sea whips in the trawled areas was higher than in the reference areas. Sponge density was also lower in the trawled areas.

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    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Long: Data from: Habitat, predation, growth, and coexistence: Could interactions between juvenile red and blue king crabs limit blue king crab productivity?

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:42:26.000Z

    This data set is from a series of laboratory experiments examining the interactions between red and blue king crabs and habitat. We examined how density and predator presence affect habitat choice by red and blue king crabs. Further experiments determined how temperature and habitat affect predation by year-1 red king crab on year-0 blue king crab. Finally, long-term interaction experiments examined how habitat and density affected growth, survival, and intra-guild interactions between red and blue king crab.

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    Tract

    highways.hidot.hawaii.gov | Last Updated 2021-06-17T21:19:00.000Z