The population density of Dana Point, CA was 5,220 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Dana Point, CA

  • API

    San Mateo County And California Crime Rates 2000-2014

    performance.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2016-08-31T20:40:07.000Z

    Violent and property crime rates per 100,000 population for San Mateo County and the State of California. The total crimes used to calculate the rates for San Mateo County include data from: Sheriff's Department Unincorporated, Atherton, Belmont, Brisbane, Broadmoor, Burlingame, Colma, Daly City, East Palo Alto, Foster City, Half Moon Bay, Hillsborough, Menlo Park, Millbrae, Pacifica, Redwood City, San Bruno, San Carlos, San Mateo, South San Francisco, Bay Area DPR, BART, Union Pacific Railroad, and CA Highway Patrol.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2020-03-27T14:45:51.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2020-03-27T14:49:32.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

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    High Risk Dashboard Indicators (Tall)

    highriskregions.auditor.ca.gov | Last Updated 2020-08-13T13:15:46.000Z

    Powers High Risk Dashboard

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    California SBC Economy and Health Data

    data.communityvitalsigns.org | Last Updated 2016-03-03T03:29:06.000Z

    All cause average age-adjusted death rate for three year periods ending 2004-2013 (CA DPH County Health Status Profiles 2006-2015) and percentage of the population living below poverty level (U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, Table S1701).

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    Vital Signs: Life Expectancy – by ZIP Code

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2018-07-06T18:05:06.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Life Expectancy (EQ6) FULL MEASURE NAME Life Expectancy LAST UPDATED April 2017 DESCRIPTION Life expectancy refers to the average number of years a newborn is expected to live if mortality patterns remain the same. The measure reflects the mortality rate across a population for a point in time. DATA SOURCE State of California, Department of Health: Death Records (1990-2013) No link California Department of Finance: Population Estimates Annual Intercensal Population Estimates (1990-2010) Table P-2: County Population by Age (2010-2013) http://www.dof.ca.gov/Forecasting/Demographics/Estimates/ U.S. Census Bureau: Decennial Census ZCTA Population (2000-2010) http://factfinder.census.gov U.S. Census Bureau: American Community Survey 5-Year Population Estimates (2013) http://factfinder.census.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@mtc.ca.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Life expectancy is commonly used as a measure of the health of a population. Life expectancy does not reflect how long any given individual is expected to live; rather, it is an artificial measure that captures an aspect of the mortality rates across a population that can be compared across time and populations. More information about the determinants of life expectancy that may lead to differences in life expectancy between neighborhoods can be found in the Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiative (BARHII) Health Inequities in the Bay Area report at http://www.barhii.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/barhii_hiba.pdf. Vital Signs measures life expectancy at birth (as opposed to cohort life expectancy). A statistical model was used to estimate life expectancy for Bay Area counties and ZIP Codes based on current life tables which require both age and mortality data. A life table is a table which shows, for each age, the survivorship of a people from a certain population. Current life tables were created using death records and population estimates by age. The California Department of Public Health provided death records based on the California death certificate information. Records include age at death and residential ZIP Code. Single-year age population estimates at the regional- and county-level comes from the California Department of Finance population estimates and projections for ages 0-100+. Population estimates for ages 100 and over are aggregated to a single age interval. Using this data, death rates in a population within age groups for a given year are computed to form unabridged life tables (as opposed to abridged life tables). To calculate life expectancy, the probability of dying between the jth and (j+1)st birthday is assumed uniform after age 1. Special consideration is taken to account for infant mortality. For the ZIP Code-level life expectancy calculation, it is assumed that postal ZIP Codes share the same boundaries as ZIP Code Census Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs). More information on the relationship between ZIP Codes and ZCTAs can be found at http://www.census.gov/geo/reference/zctas.html. ZIP Code-level data uses three years of mortality data to make robust estimates due to small sample size. Year 2013 ZIP Code life expectancy estimates reflects death records from 2011 through 2013. 2013 is the last year with available mortality data. Death records for ZIP Codes with zero population (like those associated with P.O. Boxes) were assigned to the nearest ZIP Code with population. ZIP Code population for 2000 estimates comes from the Decennial Census. ZIP Code population for 2013 estimates are from the American Community Survey (5-Year Average). ACS estimates are adjusted using Decennial Census data for more accurate population estimates. An adjustment factor was calculated using the ratio between the 2010 Decennial Census population estimates and the 2012 ACS 5-Year (with middle year 2010) population estimates. This adjustment factor is particularly im

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2020-03-27T14:54:51.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name Ixodes scapularis. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at a point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2020-03-27T14:52:18.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    COVID Vaccinations Given to SF Residents Over Time

    data.sfgov.org | Last Updated 2021-04-16T16:30:50.000Z

    <strong>A. SUMMARY</strong> This dataset represents the COVID-19 vaccinations given to San Franciscans over time. All vaccines given to people who live in San Francisco are included, no matter where the vaccination took place. (The vaccine may have been administered in San Francisco or outside of San Francisco.) The three dose types are counted separately, i.e. (1) first doses administered as a part of a two-dose vaccination, (2) second doses administered as part of a two-dose vaccination, and (3) single-dose vaccines administered. <strong>B. HOW THE DATASET IS CREATED</strong> Information on doses administered to those who live in San Francisco is from the California Immunization Registry (CAIR), run by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). <strong>C. UPDATE PROCESS</strong> Updated daily via automated process <strong>D. HOW TO USE THIS DATASET</strong> Different vaccines have different dosage requirements. For example, the Moderna and the Pfizer vaccines requires two doses for a resident to be fully vaccinated. Each dose is recorded separately in its respective column. Other vaccines, such as Johnson & Johnson, would only require a single dose to be considered fully vaccinated. Single dose vaccines counts are recorded in a separate column. Summing the NEW_1ST_DOSES, NEW_2ND_DOSES, NEW_SINGLE_DOSES columns would give you the total count of vaccine doses administered on a given day. To count the number of individuals fully vaccinated on a given day, use the NEW_SERIES_COMPLETED column. To count the number of individuals vaccinated (with any dose) for the first time on a given day, use the NEW_RECIPIENTS column. In <a href="https://data.sfgov.org/stories/s/COVID-19-Vaccinations-Progress/7mye-zncy/">our public dashboards</a> we combine this dataset with <a href="https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=popualtion%20age&g=0500000US06075&tid=ACSST5Y2019.S0101&hidePreview=false">the US Census's 2019 five-year American Community Survey population estimates</a> to estimate the percent of San Franciscans vaccinated.

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    Economy - Overall Poverty

    data.communityvitalsigns.org | Last Updated 2019-01-23T17:09:19.000Z

    Description: The percentage of the measurable population whose family/individual income is below the federal poverty threshold. Latest information is available: https://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/16_1YR/S1701/0100000US|0400000US06|0500000US06071