The population count of Long Beach, CA was 468,594 in 2014.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Long Beach, CA

  • API

    Park, Beach, Open Space, or Coastline Access 2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:39:18.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of residents within ½ mile of a park, beach, open space, or coastline, for California, its regions, counties, cities/towns, and census tracts. Data is from the California Protected Areas Database (CPAD version 1.8, 2012) and the U.S. Census Bureau. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). As communities become increasingly more urban, parks and the protection of green and open spaces within cities increase in importance. Parks and natural areas buffer pollutants and contribute to the quality of life by providing communities with social and psychological benefits such as leisure, play, sports, and contact with nature. Parks are critical to human health by providing spaces for health and wellness activities. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

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    CA Educational Attainment & Personal Income 2008-2014

    greengov.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-05-07T20:12:58.000Z

    California Educational Attainment & Personal Income as captured by the US Census Current Population Survey (CPS) for years 2008-2014.

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Long-Term Acute Care, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-22T18:10:48.000Z

    Long-term acute care is a hospital defined by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as a licensed general acute care hospital providing care for patients with medically complex conditions requiring an average length of stay for all patients of greater than 25 days. This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reported by California long-term acute care (LTAC) hospitals. The hospital onset (HO) CDI rate is calculated by dividing the number of HO CDI cases by the total inpatient days; the rate is then reported per 10,000 patient days. The rates are not risk adjusted and may reflect factors in the hospital that can affect the occurrence of CDI, such as transmission of the C. difficile bacteria and use of antimicrobials. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Differences in rates for LTAC hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. HO CDI rate in LTAC hospitals is provided separately from the rates in rehabilitation acute care hospitals. Patients in LTAC hospitals have longer lengths of stay, an established risk factor for CDI. Also, specifically for LTAC and rehabilitation acute care hospitals, we include whether a hospital uses the polymerase chain reaction test (PCR) to detect CDI. In this table, hospital rates of CDI for LTAC hospitals have not been adjusted to account for the differences in sensitivity between PCR and other laboratory testing methods; therefore, rates from hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hai/Pages/default.aspx. Differences in rates for LTAC and rehabilitation hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. Rates from rehabilitation hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable, as there can be as much as a two-fold difference in test sensitivity. Therefore, the rehabilitation hospital-specific rates presented here have not been risk adjusted and are not comparable.

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    Number and Rates of Preventable Hospitalizations for Selected Medical Conditions by California County, 2005-2015Q3

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-01-19T18:32:24.000Z

    (See Note below regarding 2015 data). The dataset contains hospitalization counts and rates, statewide and by county, for 13 ambulatory care sensitive conditions plus 3 composite measures. Hospitalizations due to these medical conditions are potentially preventable through access to high-quality outpatient care. The conditions include: diabetes short-term complications; perforated appendix; diabetes long-term complications; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma in older adults (age 40 and over); hypertension; heart failure; dehydration; bacterial pneumonia; urinary tract infection; angina without procedure; uncontrolled diabetes; asthma in younger adults (age 18-39); and lower-extremity amputation among patients with diabetes. The data provides a good starting point for assessing quality of health services in the community. The data does not measure hospital quality. Note: OSHPD is only releasing the first 3 quarters of 2015 data due to a change in the reporting of diagnoses/procedures from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS effective October 1, 2015, and the inability of the AHRQ software to handle both code sets concurrently.

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Long-Term Acute Care, 2013

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T23:19:22.000Z

    Long-term acute care is a hospital defined by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as a licensed general acute care hospital providing care for patients with medically complex conditions requiring an average length of stay for all patients of greater than 25 days. This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reported by California long-term acute care (LTAC) hospitals. The hospital onset (HO) CDI rate is calculated by dividing the number of HO CDI cases by the total inpatient days. The rates are not risk adjusted and may reflect factors in the hospital that can affect the occurrence of CDI, such as transmission of the C. difficile bacteria and use of antimicrobials. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Differences in rates for LTAC hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. HO CDI rate in LTAC hospitals is provided separately from the rates in rehabilitation acute care hospitals. Patients in LTAC hospitals have longer lengths of stay, an established risk factor for CDI. Also, specifically for LTAC and rehabilitation acute care hospitals, we include whether a hospital uses the polymerase chain reaction test (PCR) to detect CDI. In this table, hospital rates of CDI for LTAC hospitals have not been adjusted to account for the differences in sensitivity between PCR and other laboratory testing methods; therefore, rates from hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hai/Pages/default.aspx. Differences in rates for LTAC and rehabilitation hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. Rates from rehabilitation hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable, as there can be as much as a two-fold difference in test sensitivity. Therefore, the rehabilitation hospital-specific rates presented here have not been risk adjusted and are not comparable.

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Long-Term Acute Care, 2015

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-22T19:06:50.000Z

    Long-term acute care is a hospital defined by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as a licensed general acute care hospital providing care for patients with medically complex conditions requiring an average length of stay for all patients of greater than 25 days. This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reported by California long-term acute care (LTAC) hospitals. The hospital onset (HO) CDI rate is calculated by dividing the number of HO CDI cases by the total inpatient days; the rate is then reported per 10,000 patient days. The rates are not risk adjusted and may reflect factors in the hospital that can affect the occurrence of CDI, such as transmission of the C. difficile bacteria and use of antimicrobials. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Differences in rates for LTAC hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. HO CDI rate in LTAC hospitals is provided separately from the rates in rehabilitation acute care hospitals. Patients in LTAC hospitals have longer lengths of stay, an established risk factor for CDI. Also, specifically for LTAC and rehabilitation acute care hospitals, we include whether a hospital uses the polymerase chain reaction test (PCR) to detect CDI. In this table, hospital rates of CDI for LTAC hospitals have not been adjusted to account for the differences in sensitivity between PCR and other laboratory testing methods; therefore, rates from hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hai/Pages/default.aspx. Differences in rates for LTAC and rehabilitation hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. Rates from rehabilitation hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable, as there can be as much as a two-fold difference in test sensitivity. Therefore, the rehabilitation hospital-specific rates presented here have not been risk adjusted and are not comparable.

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    Transportation to Work 2000-2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:16:27.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of residents aged 16 years and older mode of transportation to work for California, its regions, counties, cities/towns, and census tracts. Data is from the U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census and American Community Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). Commute trips to work represent 19% of travel miles in the United States. The predominant mode – the automobile - offers extraordinary personal mobility and independence, but it is also associated with health hazards, such as air pollution, motor vehicle crashes, pedestrian injuries and fatalities, and sedentary lifestyles. Automobile commuting has been linked to stress-related health problems. Active modes of transport – bicycling and walking alone and in combination with public transit – offer opportunities for physical activity, which is associated with lowering rates of heart disease and stroke, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, dementia and depression. Risk of injury and death in collisions are higher in urban areas with more concentrated vehicle and pedestrian activity. Bus and rail passengers have a lower risk of injury in collisions than motorcyclists, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Minority communities bear a disproportionate share of pedestrian-car fatalities; Native American male pedestrians experience four times the death rate Whites or Asian pedestrians, and African-Americans and Latinos experience twice the rate as Whites or Asians. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

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    Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) in Patient Care Areas, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-22T18:51:44.000Z

    This 2014 central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates file includes four patient care areas: 1) Critical Care Areas (CCAs) are nursing care areas that provide intensive observation, diagnosis, and therapeutic procedures for patients who are critically ill. These areas exclude step-down, intermediate, or telemetry care areas. 2) Neonatal Critical Care (NCC) Areas specialize in Level II/III and/or Level III critical care provided to newborns and infants. 3) General Care Areas (WARDS) include the following types of locations: stepdown general care locations specializing in patients that are hemodynamically stable; medical general care locations providing evaluation and treatment of nonsurgical conditions; medical/surgical general care locations providing evaluation and treatment of medical and/or surgical conditions; surgical general care locations providing evaluation and treatment for pre- or post-surgical conditions; long-term acute care locations specializing in patients requiring an extended stay in an acute care environment; adult rehabilitation general care locations providing care to patients who have lost function; labor, delivery, recovery, postpartum general care locations providing evaluation and treatment of normal and high risk pregnancy patients; behavioral general care locations providing evaluation and treatment of patients with acute psychiatric or behavioral disorders; jail general care locations providing evaluation and treatment of patients who are in custody of law enforcement during their treatment; and pediatric general care locations providing evaluation or treatment to any patient less than or equal to 18 years of age for any medical or surgical condition. 4) Special Care Areas (SCA) are nursing care areas which specialize in patients who undergo bone marrow (stem cell) transplant for the treatment of various disorders; or require management and treatment for cancer and/or blood disorders; or require postoperative care after solid organ transplant. Starting with this 2014 SCA file, six treatment locations were added: "Oncology - Medical/Surgical Critical Care", Permanent and Temporary Central Line Days, "Oncology - General Hematology/Oncology Ward", Permanent and Temporary Central Line Days, and "Oncology Solid Tumor Ward", Permanent and Temporary Central Line Days. This combined CLABSI rates table shows the hospital-specific CLABSI data and central line insertion practices (CLIP) adherence percent by patient care locations in CCAs, NCCs and one new treatment area within SCA, "Oncology - Medical/Surgical Critical Care", Permanent and Central Line Days. The CLABSI measures include the number of CLABSIs, central line-days, patient days, CLABSI rates and their 95% confidence intervals. We also performed statistical analyses to determine if the rates are statistically higher, lower, or no different than the California average rates by patient care locations. We know CLABSI rates are influenced by clinical and infection control practices related to central line insertion and maintenance procedures, patient-based risk factors, and surveillance methods. While stratifying CLABSI rates by patient care location makes rates more comparable, this data risk adjusted procedure cannot control for all individual patient factors that can affect CLABSI rates. A low CLABSI rate may reflect greater diligence with infection prevention or may result from less effective surveillance methods that detect fewer infections, including the failure to consistently apply all currently accepted standardized surveillance definitions and protocols. Similarly, a high rate may reflect the failure to consistently implement all recommended infection prevention practices or use more aggressive infection surveillance methods that can include the application of standardized surveillance definitions and protocols. Finally, readers should understand the limitations of results based on the analysis of only two time periods, s

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Rehabilitation Facilities, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-22T21:47:13.000Z

    Rehabilitation hospitals are hospitals with inpatient wards for evaluation and restoration of function to patients who have lost function due to acute or chronic pain, musculoskeletal problems, stroke, or catastrophic events resulting in complete or partial paralysis. These hospitals were self-identified through National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reported by California rehabilitation acute care hospitals. The hospital onset (HO) CDI rate is calculated by dividing the number of HO CDI cases by the total inpatient days; the rate is then reported per 10,000 patient days. The rates are not risk adjusted and may reflect factors in the hospital that can affect the occurrence of CDI, such as transmission of the C. difficile bacteria and use of antimicrobials. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Differences in rates for rehabilitation acute care hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. HO CDI rate in rehabilitation acute care hospitals is provided separately from the rates in long-term acute care (LTAC) hospitals. Patients in LTAC hospitals have longer lengths of stay, an established risk factor for CDI. Also, specifically for LTAC and rehabilitation acute care hospitals, we include whether a hospital uses the polymerase chain reaction test (PCR) to detect CDI. In this table, hospital rates of CDI for rehabilitation acute care hospitals have not been adjusted to account for the differences in sensitivity between PCR and other laboratory testing methods; therefore, rates from hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hai/Pages/default.aspx. Differences in rates for LTAC and rehabilitation hospitals can result from differences in laboratory testing methodology, patient populations, infection and transmission prevention practices, antibiotic utilization, and/or community onset rates of CDI. Rates from rehabilitation hospitals using different types of laboratory tests are not comparable, as there can be as much as a two-fold difference in test sensitivity. Therefore, the rehabilitation hospital-specific rates presented here have not been risk adjusted and are not comparable.

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Hospitals, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-22T21:43:58.000Z

    This table shows the Center for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) standardized infection ratios (SIR) of hospital onset (HO) Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) reported by California general acute care hospitals other than long-term and rehabilitation acute care hospitals. The HO CDI SIR, which adjusts for significant risk factors, is calculated by comparing the number of CDI that occurred (or were observed) in the hospital in 2014 to the number that would be predicted based on the national referent CDI rate data. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Risk factors found to be significant in predicting HO CDI incidence include the type of CDI test used by the hospital, if the hospital is affiliated with a medical school, hospital bed size, and the burden of community-onset CDI in patients admitted to the hospital. Adjusting for these factors provides for a more accurate comparison of hospitals’ infections. Hospitals with NHSN-predicted number of HO CDI cases <1 had no SIRs calculated by NHSN due to less precise comparisons. For each hospital with a CDI SIR, we performed a statistical analysis to determine if the observed number of infections was significantly different than the predicted number. Based on our statistical analysis we labeled each hospital’s CDI SIR as indicating: • No Different - no difference in number of observed and predicted infections, • Higher - higher or more infections than predicted, or • Lower - lower or fewer infections than predicted. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hai/Pages/default.aspx The SIRs cannot be compared across hospitals because of "indirect" standardization methodology used in calculating the SIRs.