The high school graduation rate of Long Beach, CA was 79.30% in 2013.

Graduation Rates

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Education and Graduation Rates Datasets Involving Long Beach, CA

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    CA Educational Attainment & Personal Income 2008-2014

    greengov.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-05-07T20:12:58.000Z

    California Educational Attainment & Personal Income as captured by the US Census Current Population Survey (CPS) for years 2008-2014.

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    CA Wellness Plan Data Reference Guide

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-09T18:42:01.000Z

    The purpose of the California Wellness Plan (CWP) Data Reference Guide (Reference Guide) is to provide access to the lowest-level data for each CWP Objective; lowest-level data source, instructions to access data, and additional details are described. Some CWP Objectives do not have program leads, data sources, baselines, and/or targets, but are included because they were a result of CDPH program or partner input and were felt to be important to the reduction of chronic disease incidence, prevalence, and health disparities. Agencies, programs and/or partners identified with an objective may be either data stewards and/or engaged in activities to achieve the target, but may not have adequate resources for statewide activities. Developmental Objectives will be updated as information becomes available. Background: The California Wellness Plan, California's Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Plan was released February 2014 by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The overarching goal of CWP is Equity in Health and Wellbeing; additional CWP Goals include: 1) Healthy Communities, 2) Optimal Health Systems Linked with Community Prevention, 3) Accessible and Usable Health Information, and 4) Prevention Sustainability and Capacity. All CWP objectives fall under the framework of Let's Get Healthy California Task Force priorities. California Wellness Plan - https://archive.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cdcb/Documents/CDPH-CAWellnessPlan2014%20(Agency%20Approved)%20FINAL%202-27-14(Protected)%20rev%20(8).pdf

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    Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Bloodstream Infections in Hospitals, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T15:06:27.000Z

    This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset (HO) vancomycin-resistant Enterococci bloodstream infections (VRE BSI) reported by California general acute care hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), during the time period January through December 2014, grouped by hospital type: Critical access acute care hospital (CAH; defined as certain facilities that participate in Medicare and that are designated by states through a protocol); long-term acute care hospital (LTAC; defined by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as providing care to patients with medically complex conditions requiring an average length of stay greater than 25 days); major teaching acute care hospital (MTAC; a hospital that self-identifies and is confirmed by California Department of Public Health (CDPH) as providing an important part of the teaching program of a medical school); pediatric acute care hospital (PEDS; a hospital defined by CDPH as a stand-alone children's hospital); prison hospital (PRIS; a hospital associated with a correctional institution, as identified by CDPH); rehabilitation acute care hospital (REHAB; defined by the Social Security Administration as providing care to evaluate and restore function); or community hospital (COM; a hospital not classified as one of the above other types). VRE BSI cases are classified as HO when a positive blood sample is obtained on day four or later during a hospital stay, from a patient with no prior positive blood culture within the preceding two weeks. The HO VRE BSI rate is calculated by dividing the number of cases by the total number of patient days; the rate is then reported per 10,000 patient days. The VRE BSI rates in this data release are not risk adjusted because there are no such methods available at this time. The unadjusted VRE BSI rates herein are also affected by clinical and infection control practices and/or surveillance methods. While stratifying VRE BSI rates by hospital type may make rates more comparable, it cannot control for all factors that can affect VRE BSI rates. Therefore, comparisons between hospitals within type groups (strata) should still be made with caution. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of VRE BSI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "MRSA and VRE BSI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report on: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Hospitals, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T15:39:01.000Z

    This table shows the Center for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) standardized infection ratios (SIR) of hospital onset (HO) Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) reported by California general acute care hospitals other than long-term and rehabilitation acute care hospitals. The HO CDI SIR, which adjusts for significant risk factors, is calculated by comparing the number of CDI that occurred (or were observed) in the hospital in 2014 to the number that would be predicted based on the national referent CDI rate data. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Risk factors found to be significant in predicting HO CDI incidence include the type of CDI test used by the hospital, if the hospital is affiliated with a medical school, hospital bed size, and the burden of community-onset CDI in patients admitted to the hospital. Adjusting for these factors provides for a more accurate comparison of hospitals’ infections. Hospitals with NHSN-predicted number of HO CDI cases <1 had no SIRs calculated by NHSN due to less precise comparisons. For each hospital with a CDI SIR, we performed a statistical analysis to determine if the observed number of infections was significantly different than the predicted number. Based on our statistical analysis we labeled each hospital’s CDI SIR as indicating: • No Different - no difference in number of observed and predicted infections, • Higher - higher or more infections than predicted, or • Lower - lower or fewer infections than predicted. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx The SIRs cannot be compared across hospitals because of "indirect" standardization methodology used in calculating the SIRs.

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    Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Bloodstream Infections in Hospitals, 2013

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T15:07:38.000Z

    This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset (HO) vancomycin-resistant Enterococci bloodstream infections (VRE BSI) reported by California general acute care hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), during the time period January through December 2013, grouped by hospital type; see Data Dictionary for definition of different hospital types. VRE BSI cases are classified as HO when a positive blood sample is obtained on day four or later during a hospital stay, from a patient with no prior positive blood culture within the preceding two weeks. The HO VRE BSI rate is calculated by dividing the number of cases by the total number of patient days; the rate is then reported per 10,000 patient days. The VRE BSI rates in this data release are not risk adjusted because there are no such methods available at this time. The unadjusted VRE BSI rates herein are also affected by clinical and infection control practices and/or surveillance methods. While stratifying VRE BSI rates by hospital type may make rates more comparable, it cannot control for all factors that can affect VRE BSI rates. Therefore, comparisons between hospitals within type groups (strata) should still be made with caution. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of VRE BSI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "Data and Methods" section of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report on: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx

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    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Bloodstream Infections in Hospitals, 2014

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T14:44:13.000Z

    This table shows the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) standardized infection ratios (SIR) of hospital onset (HO) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream Infections (MRSA BSI) reported by California general acute care hospitals other than long-term and rehabilitation acute care hospitals. The HO MRSA BSI SIR, which adjusts for significant risk factors, is calculated by comparing the number of MRSA BSI that occurred (or were observed) in the hospital in 2014 to the number that would be predicted based on the national referent MRSA BSI rate data. MRSA BSI cases are classified as HO when the first positive blood test is obtained after the third day of hospitalization. Risk factors found to be significant in predicting HO MRSA BSI incidence include hospital bed size, affiliation with a medical school, and the community burden of MRSA BSI as observed in patients admitted to the hospital. Adjusting for these factors provides for a more accurate comparison of hospitals’ infections. For more precise comparisons, NHSN only calculates a SIR when at least one HO MRSA BSI is predicted, which is determined by patient volume and other factors predictive of acquiring MRSA BSI. However, we calculated the SIR for such hospitals with HO MRSA BSI predicted less than one if the number of HO MRSA BSI observed was ≥ 3. For each hospital with a MRSA BSI SIR, we performed a statistical analysis to determine if the observed number of infections was significantly different than the predicted number. Based on our statistical analysis we labeled each hospital’s MRSA BSI SIR as indicating: • No Different - no difference in number of observed and predicted infections, • Higher - high or more infections than predicted, or • Lower - low or fewer infections than predicted. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of MRSA BSI identified in their facilities associated with inpatient treatment. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "MRSA and VRE BSI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report on: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx. The SIRs cannot be compared across hospitals because of "indirect" standardization methodology used in calculating the SIRs.

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    Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Bloodstream Infections in Hospitals, 2015

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T15:09:05.000Z

    This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset (HO) vancomycin-resistant Enterococci bloodstream infections (VRE BSI) reported by California general acute care hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), during the time period January through December 2015, grouped by hospital type: Critical access acute care hospital (CAH; defined as certain facilities that participate in Medicare and that are designated by states through a protocol); long-term acute care hospital (LTAC; defined by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as providing care to patients with medically complex conditions requiring an average length of stay greater than 25 days); major teaching acute care hospital (MTAC; a hospital that self-identifies and is confirmed by California Department of Public Health (CDPH) as providing an important part of the teaching program of a medical school); pediatric acute care hospital (PED; a hospital defined by CDPH as a stand-alone children's hospital); free-standing rehabilitation acute care hospital and rehabilitation unit with its own Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services certification number (REHAB; defined by the Social Security Administration as providing care to evaluate and restore function); or community hospital (COM; a hospital not classified as one of the above other types). VRE BSI cases are classified as HO when a positive blood sample is obtained on day four or later during a hospital stay, from a patient with no prior positive blood culture within the preceding two weeks. The HO VRE BSI rate is calculated by dividing the number of cases by the total number of patient days; the rate is then reported per 10,000 patient days. The VRE BSI rates in this data release are not risk adjusted because there are no such methods available at this time. The unadjusted VRE BSI rates herein are also affected by clinical and infection control practices and/or surveillance methods. While stratifying VRE BSI rates by hospital type may make rates more comparable, it cannot control for all factors that can affect VRE BSI rates. Therefore, comparisons between hospitals within type groups (strata) should still be made with caution. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of VRE BSI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "MRSA and VRE BSI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report on: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx

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    Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) in Critical Care Areas, 2013

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T15:18:37.000Z

    Critical Care Areas (CCAs) are nursing care areas that provide intensive observation, diagnosis, and therapeutic procedures for patients who are critically ill. These areas exclude step-down, intermediate, or telemetry care areas. This table shows the hospital-specific central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data and central line insertion practices (CLIP) adherence percent by patient care locations in CCAs excluding neonatal critical care. The CLABSI data for each hospital include number of CLABSIs, central line-days and patient days, CLABSI rates and their 95% confidence intervals. We also performed statistical analysis to determine whether the rates are statistically higher, lower, or no different than California average rates by patient care locations. California average rates for 2013 can be found at https://archive.cdph.ca.gov/programs/hai/Documents/2013-CLABSI-T1.pdf. CLABSI rates are affected by clinical and infection control practices related to central line insertion and maintenance practices, patient-based risk factors, and surveillance methods. While stratifying CLABSI rates by patient care location makes rates more comparable, it cannot control for all individual patient factors that can affect CLABSI rates. A low CLABSI rate may reflect greater diligence with infection prevention or may reflect less effective surveillance methods that detect fewer infections, including failure to appropriately apply standardized surveillance definitions and protocols. Similarly, a high rate may reflect failure to consistently implement all recommended infection prevention practices or more aggressive infection surveillance including more consistent application of standardized surveillance definitions and protocols. Finally, readers should consider comparisons between two time periods cautiously, as more time is needed to determine if changes will be sustained, and therefore, more meaningful. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code (HSC) Section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals (GACH) to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CLABSI identified in their facilities. Also, HSC Section 1288.8(b) requires GACHs to report to CDPH in its implementation of infection surveillance and infection prevention process measures including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for central line insertion practices. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the CDC National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CLABSI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx

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    Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) in Hospitals, 2013

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T15:34:53.000Z

    This table shows the Center for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) standardized infection ratios (SIR) of hospital onset (HO) Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) reported by California general acute care hospitals other than long-term and rehabilitation acute care hospitals. The HO CDI SIR, which adjusts for significant risk factors, is calculated by comparing the number of CDI that occurred (or were observed) in the hospital in 2013 to the number that would be predicted based on the national referent CDI rate data. CDI cases are classified as HO when the positive stool sample is obtained on day four or later during the hospital stay. Risk factors found to be significant in predicting HO CDI incidence include the type of CDI test used by the hospital, if the hospital is affiliated with a medical school, hospital bed size, and the burden of community-onset CDI in patients admitted to the hospital. Adjusting for these factors provides for a more accurate comparison of hospitals’ infections. For more precise comparisons, NHSN only calculates a SIR when at least one HO CDI is predicted, which is determined by patient volume and other factors predictive of acquiring CDI. However, we calculated the SIR for such hospitals with HO CDI predicted less than one if the number of HO CDI observed was greater than zero. For each hospital with a CDI SIR, we performed a statistical analysis to determine if the observed number of infections was significantly different than the predicted number. Based on our statistical analysis we labeled each hospital’s CDI SIR as: • No difference - no difference in number of observed and predicted infections, • Higher - high or more infections than predicted, or • Lower - low or fewer infections than predicted. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf. Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of CDI identified in their facilities. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "CDI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report at: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx The SIRs cannot be compared across hospitals because of "indirect" standardization methodology used in calculating the SIRs.

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    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Bloodstream Infections in Hospitals, 2013

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T14:41:28.000Z

    This table shows the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) standardized infection ratios (SIR) of hospital onset (HO) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream Infections (MRSA BSI) reported by California general acute care hospitals other than long-term and rehabilitation acute care hospitals. The HO MRSA BSI SIR, which adjusts for significant risk factors, is calculated by comparing the number of MRSA BSI that occurred (or were observed) in the hospital in 2013 to the number that would be predicted based on the national referent MRSA BSI rate data. MRSA BSI cases are classified as HO when the first positive blood test is obtained after the third day of hospitalization. Risk factors found to be significant in predicting HO MRSA BSI incidence include hospital bed size, affiliation with a medical school, and the community burden of MRSA BSI as observed in patients admitted to the hospital. Adjusting for these factors provides for a more accurate comparison of hospitals’ infections. For more precise comparisons, NHSN only calculates a SIR when at least one HO MRSA BSI is predicted, which is determined by patient volume and other factors predictive of acquiring MRSA BSI. However, we calculated the SIR for such hospitals with HO MRSA BSI predicted less than one if the number of HO MRSA BSI observed was greater than zero. For each hospital with a MRSA BSI SIR, we performed a statistical analysis to determine if the observed number of infections was significantly different than the predicted number. Based on our statistical analysis we labeled each hospital’s MRSA BSI SIR as: • No difference - no difference in number of observed and predicted infections, • Higher - high or more infections than predicted, or • Lower - low or fewer infections than predicted. To link the CDPH facility IDs with those from other Departments, like OSHPD, please reference the "Licensed Facility Cross-Walk" Open Data table at https://chhs.data.ca.gov/Facilities-and-Services/Licensed-Facility-Cross-Walk/tthg-z4mf Health and Safety Code section 1288.55(a)(1) requires general acute care hospitals to report to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) all cases of MRSA BSI identified in their facilities associated with inpatient treatment. The data are submitted by California hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). For more information on data collection processes and methods, please see the "MRSA and VRE BSI Technical Notes" of the healthcare-associated infections (HAI) report on: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CHCQ/HAI/Pages/HAIProgramHome.aspx. The SIRs cannot be compared across hospitals because of "indirect" standardization methodology used in calculating the SIRs.