The median earnings of Monterey Park, CA was $30,594 in 2013.

Earnings and Gender

Earnings and Education

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Jobs and Earnings Datasets Involving Monterey Park, CA

  • API

    City Revenues - Taxes

    bythenumbers.sco.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-10-24T20:40:50.000Z

    Functional and general revenues from taxes.

  • API

    City Revenues - Current Service Charges

    bythenumbers.sco.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-10-24T20:52:14.000Z

    Functional revenues from current service charges.

  • API

    Santa Monica Address Points

    data.smgov.net | Last Updated 2014-09-22T17:22:18.000Z

    Residential, Business, Government and Institutional addresses in Santa Monica, CA.

  • API

    CA Affordable Housing And Sustainable Communities (AHSC) Awards

    greengov.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2016-06-06T21:39:17.000Z

    This dataset includes all Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Awards. This includes the location of the awards, the award amounts, award amounts for each Project component, GHG reductions, and co-benefits.

  • API

    City Airport Activity/Enterprise

    bythenumbers.sco.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-10-24T17:41:25.000Z

    Uniform financial information related to airport activities regardless of what basis the city uses to account for these transactions.

  • API

    Housing Cost Burden, 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T18:09:22.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of households paying more than 30% (or 50%) of monthly household income towards housing costs for California, its regions, counties, cities/towns, and census tracts. Data is from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Consolidated Planning Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) and the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS). The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OHE/Pages/Healthy-Communities-Data-and-Indicators-Project-(HCI).aspx). Affordable, quality housing is central to health, conferring protection from the environment and supporting family life. Housing costs—typically the largest, single expense in a family's budget—also impact decisions that affect health. As housing consumes larger proportions of household income, families have less income for nutrition, health care, transportation, education, etc. Severe cost burdens may induce poverty—which is associated with developmental and behavioral problems in children and accelerated cognitive and physical decline in adults. Low-income families and minority communities are disproportionately affected by the lack of affordable, quality housing. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the Attachments.

  • API

    Food Affordability, 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T18:06:25.000Z

    This table contains data on the average cost of a market basket of nutritious food items relative to income for female-headed households with children, for California, its regions, counties, and cities/towns. The ratio uses data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Census Bureau. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity. An adequate, nutritious diet is a necessity at all stages of life. Inadequate diets can impair intellectual performance and have been linked to more frequent school absence and poorer educational achievement in children. Nutrition also plays a significant role in causing or preventing a number of illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, some cancers, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and anemia. At least two factors influence the affordability of food and the dietary choices of families – the cost of food and family income. The inability to afford food is a major factor in food insecurity, which has a spectrum of effects including anxiety over food sufficiency or food shortages; reduced quality or desirability of diet; and disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the Attachments.

  • API

    Benefits Paid By County (All Programs)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-11-03T20:07:44.000Z

    ∙ The data provided is the amount of Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits paid to claimants.  ∙ The data by county represents the mailing address given by the claimant at the time of filing for UI.  It is possible that an individual can reside in a different county than their mailing address.  Also, this information does not represent the county where the individual worked.  It is also possible that a claimant could have moved or changed their mailing address after filing for UI which would not be reflected here. Data for claimants residing outside of California but collecting benefits are not included in these figures nor are invalid addresses in California where a county cannot be determined. ∙ Data includes the regular UI program and the federal extended benefit programs. The Federal extended benefit programs are: ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 1 - California began paying benefits in July 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 2 - California began paying benefits in January 2009, payments retroactive to November 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 3 - California began paying benefits in December 2009, payments retroactive to November 2009. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 4 - California began paying benefits in January 2010, payments retroactive to December 2009. ∙ FED-ED - California began paying benefits May 2009, payments retroactive to February 2009.

  • API

    Housing Crowding 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T20:10:39.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of household overcrowding (> 1.0 persons per room) and severe overcrowding (> 1.5 persons per room)for California, its regions, counties, and cities/towns. Data is from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Consolidated Planning Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS). The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OHE/Pages/Healthy-Communities-Data-and-Indicators-Project-(HCI).aspx). Residential crowding has been linked to an increased risk of infection from communicable diseases, a higher prevalence of respiratory ailments, and greater vulnerability to homelessness among the poor. Residential crowding reflects demographic and socioeconomic conditions. Older-adult immigrant and recent immigrant communities, families with low income and renter-occupied households are more likely to experience household crowding. A form of residential overcrowding known as "doubling up"—co-residence with family members or friends for economic reasons—is the most commonly reported prior living situation for families and individuals before the onset of homelessness. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the Attachments.

  • API

    Initial Claims By County (All Programs)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-11-03T18:36:44.000Z

    Initial Claims by County (all programs) - The number of claims submitted for all UI programs. Initial claims totals are not representative of the number of individuals filing as a claimant can have multiple initial claims. ∙ Initial Claims by County - The data provided is the number of Unemployment Insurance (UI) initial claim counts, which includes new claims, additional claims, and transitional claims. • A "new claim" is the first claim for a benefit year period (e.g., for the regular UI program it is 52 weeks).  An individual would only have one new claim during a benefit year period. • An "additional claim" is when another claim is filed during the same benefit year and there is intervening work between the current claim and the previous claim.  For example, an individual files a new claim, goes back to work, gets laid off and files another claim before the benefit year period of the first claim expires.  An individual can have multiple additional claims during the same benefit year if the individual meets the eligibility requirements. • A "transitional claim" is when a claimant is still collecting benefits at the end of their benefit year period and had sufficient wage earnings during that year to start up a new claim once the first benefit year period ends. ∙ The data by county represents the mailing address given by the claimant at the time of filing for UI.  It is possible that an individual can reside in a different county than their mailing address.  Also, this information does not represent the county where the individual worked.  It is also possible that a claimant could have moved or changed their mailing address after filing for UI which would not be reflected here. Data for claimants residing outside of California but collecting benefits are not included in these figures nor are invalid addresses in California where a county cannot be determined. "∙ Initial claims does not represent total individuals as an individual can have multiple claims. For example, someone may begin collecting UI benefits, then go off UI to return to work, then get laid off and go back on UI. In this example, the individual would have two claim counts. " ∙ Data includes the regular UI program and the federal extended benefit programs. The Federal extended benefit programs are: ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 1 - California began paying benefits in July 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 2 - California began paying benefits in January 2009, payments retroactive to November 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 3 - California began paying benefits in December 2009, payments retroactive to November 2009. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 4 - California began paying benefits in January 2010, payments retroactive to December 2009. ∙ FED-ED - California began paying benefits May 2009, payments retroactive to February 2009.