The number of employees of San Francisco, CA was 45,661 for business and finance in 2016.

Occupations

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Jobs and Occupations Datasets Involving San Francisco, CA

  • API

    Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2018-11-20T22:29:59.000Z

    The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey collects data from a sample of establishments and calculates employment and wage estimates by occupation, industry, and geographic area. The semiannual survey covers all non-farm industries. Data are collected by the Employment Development Department in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor. The OES Program estimates employment and wages for over 800 occupations from an annual sample of approx. 34,000 California employers. It also produces employment and wage estimates for statewide, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), and Balance of State areas. Estimates are a snapshot in time and should not be used as a time series.

  • API

    Living Wage

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:39:34.000Z

    This table contains data on the living wage and the percent of families with incomes below the living wage for California, its counties, regions and cities/towns. Living wage is the wage needed to cover basic family expenses (basic needs budget) plus all relevant taxes; it does not include publicly provided income or housing assistance. The percent of families below the living wage was calculated using data from the Living Wage Calculator (http://livingwage.mit.edu/) and the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). The living wage is the wage or annual income that covers the cost of the bare necessities of life for a worker and his/her family. These necessities include housing, transportation, food, childcare, health care, and payment of taxes. Low income populations and non-white race/ethnic have disproportionately lower wages, poorer housing, and higher levels of food insecurity. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

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    Employment Data by City

    data.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2016-08-10T18:35:32.000Z

    Employment and unemployment data by city for places in San Mateo County. CDP is "Census Designated Place" - a recognized community that was unincorporated at the time of the 2000 Census. 1) Data may not add due to rounding. All unemployment rates shown are calculated on unrounded data. 2) These data are not seasonally adjusted. Methodology: Monthly city and CDP labor force data are derived by multiplying current estimates of county employment and unemployment by the employment and unemployment shares (ratios) of each city and CDP at the time of the 2000 Census. Ratios for cities of 25,000 or more persons were developed from special tabulations based on household population only from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For smaller cities and CDP, ratios were calculated from published census data. City and CDP unrounded employment and unemployment are summed to get the labor force. The unemployment rate is calculated by dividing unemployment by the labor force. Then the labor force, employment, and unemployment are rounded. This method assumes that the rates of change in employment and unemployment, since 2000, are exactly the same in each city and CDP as at the county level (i.e., that the shares are still accurate). If this assumption is not true for a specific city or CDP, then the estimates for that area may not represent the current economic conditions. Since this assumption is untested, caution should be employed when using these data.

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    San Mateo County and Other Bay Area Counties Annual Unemployment Rate (not seasonally adjusted) 2000-2015

    performance.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2016-08-03T17:48:04.000Z

    San Mateo County and Other Bay Area Counties Annual Unemployment Rate (not seasonally adjusted) for years 2000-2013 Compared to Marin County, San Francisco County, Santa Clara County, and the State of California. Data for years 2000-2015 is non-preliminary.

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    Historical Data For Unemployment Rate In San Mateo County

    performance.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2013-12-19T21:17:20.000Z

    Monthly historical data for the unemployment rate (not seasonally adjusted) in San Mateo County from 1990-2013.

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    Time Walk Bike to Work, 2001-2011

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:20:54.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of population aged 16 years or older whose commute to work is 10 or more minutes/day by walking or biking for California, its regions, counties, and cities/towns. Data is from the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, and from the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, and National Household Travel Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). Active modes of transport, bicycling and walking alone and in combination with public transit, offer opportunities to incorporate physical activity into the daily routine. Physical activity is associated with lowering rates of heart disease and stroke, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, dementia and depression. Automobile commuting is associated with health hazards, such as air pollution, motor vehicle crashes, pedestrian injuries and fatalities, and sedentary lifestyles. Consequently the transition from automobile-focused transport to public and active transport offers environmental health benefits, including reductions in air pollution, greenhouse gases and noise pollution, and may lead to greater overall safety in transportation. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

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    Healthy Neighborhoods in San Mateo County

    data.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2016-10-04T22:10:04.000Z

    Healthy Neighborhoods data for Get Healthy San Mateo County's Healthy Cities SMC: http://www.gethealthysmc.org/healthy-cities-smc

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    Presidential Election Turnout San Mateo County 2008

    data.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2014-07-18T21:28:41.000Z

    Election turnout in San Mateo County for the 2008 Preseidential Election. Source provided by the California Secretary of State: http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/elections

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    Initial Claims By County (All Programs)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2018-09-24T16:35:03.000Z

    Initial Claims by County (all programs) - The number of claims submitted for all UI programs. Initial claims totals are not representative of the number of individuals filing as a claimant can have multiple initial claims. ∙ Initial Claims by County - The data provided is the number of Unemployment Insurance (UI) initial claim counts, which includes new claims, additional claims, and transitional claims. • A "new claim" is the first claim for a benefit year period (e.g., for the regular UI program it is 52 weeks).  An individual would only have one new claim during a benefit year period. • An "additional claim" is when another claim is filed during the same benefit year and there is intervening work between the current claim and the previous claim.  For example, an individual files a new claim, goes back to work, gets laid off and files another claim before the benefit year period of the first claim expires.  An individual can have multiple additional claims during the same benefit year if the individual meets the eligibility requirements. • A "transitional claim" is when a claimant is still collecting benefits at the end of their benefit year period and had sufficient wage earnings during that year to start up a new claim once the first benefit year period ends. ∙ The data by county represents the mailing address given by the claimant at the time of filing for UI.  It is possible that an individual can reside in a different county than their mailing address.  Also, this information does not represent the county where the individual worked.  It is also possible that a claimant could have moved or changed their mailing address after filing for UI which would not be reflected here. Data for claimants residing outside of California but collecting benefits are not included in these figures nor are invalid addresses in California where a county cannot be determined. "∙ Initial claims does not represent total individuals as an individual can have multiple claims. For example, someone may begin collecting UI benefits, then go off UI to return to work, then get laid off and go back on UI. In this example, the individual would have two claim counts. " ∙ Data includes the regular UI program and the federal extended benefit programs. The Federal extended benefit programs are: ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 1 - California began paying benefits in July 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 2 - California began paying benefits in January 2009, payments retroactive to November 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 3 - California began paying benefits in December 2009, payments retroactive to November 2009. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 4 - California began paying benefits in January 2010, payments retroactive to December 2009. ∙ FED-ED - California began paying benefits May 2009, payments retroactive to February 2009.

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    Benefits Paid By County (All Programs)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2018-09-24T21:25:10.000Z

    ∙ The data provided is the amount of Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits paid to claimants.  ∙ The data by county represents the mailing address given by the claimant at the time of filing for UI.  It is possible that an individual can reside in a different county than their mailing address.  Also, this information does not represent the county where the individual worked.  It is also possible that a claimant could have moved or changed their mailing address after filing for UI which would not be reflected here. Data for claimants residing outside of California but collecting benefits are not included in these figures nor are invalid addresses in California where a county cannot be determined. ∙ Data includes the regular UI program and the federal extended benefit programs. The Federal extended benefit programs are: ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 1 - California began paying benefits in July 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 2 - California began paying benefits in January 2009, payments retroactive to November 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 3 - California began paying benefits in December 2009, payments retroactive to November 2009. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 4 - California began paying benefits in January 2010, payments retroactive to December 2009. ∙ FED-ED - California began paying benefits May 2009, payments retroactive to February 2009.