The population count of Pearl City, HI was 47,277 in 2014.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Pearl City, HI

  • API

    Phase 2 SBIR Awards in Hawaii - 2000~2013

    data.hawaii.gov | Last Updated 2014-12-11T23:30:29.000Z

    Phase 2 SBIR Awards in Hawaii from 2000 to 2013

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    SBIR Awards in Hawaii - Phase 1 - 2000 to 2013

    data.hawaii.gov | Last Updated 2014-12-11T21:34:31.000Z

    Phase 1 SBIR Awards in State of Hawaii from 2000 to 2013

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    Table 1.09 DE FACTO POPULATION, BY COUNTY 1990 TO 2014 (as of July 1)

    data.hawaii.gov | Last Updated 2015-10-27T00:31:23.000Z

    * Includes all persons physically present in an area, regardless of military status or usual place of residence. * Includes visitors present but excludes residents temporarily absent, both calculated as an average daily census. * Maui County includes Kalawao County. The 2014 de facto population of Kalawao County, which is the Kalaupapa Settlement on Molokai, was 89. Source: DBEDT calculations based on Hawaii tourism data and population data by the U.S. Census Bureau Please go to the DBEDT Databook site, http://hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/economic/databook, for the complete data source.

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    Table 1.06 RESIDENT POPULATION, BY COUNTY 2000 TO 2014 (as of July 1)

    data.hawaii.gov | Last Updated 2015-10-27T00:48:37.000Z

    * Based on place of usual residence, regardless of physical location on the estimate or census date. * Includes military personnel stationed or homeported in Hawaii and residents temporarily absent; excludes visitors present * Maui County includes Kalawao County (Kalaupapa Settlement). Kalawao had 147 in 2000, 90 in 2010 and 89 in 2014. * Population estimates for 2000 through 2009 were revised based upon the April 1, 2010 figures which were released September 28, 2011. * Population estimates after April 1, 2010 were based on revisions released in March 2015 and may differ somewhat from earlier figures cited in other tables. Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

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    DBEDT Hawaii De Facto Population By County 2000-2010

    data.hawaii.gov | Last Updated 2012-09-05T00:34:45.000Z

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    Hate Crimes by County and Bias Type: Beginning 2010

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2016-09-19T19:08:40.000Z

    Under New York State’s Hate Crime Law (Penal Law Article 485), a person commits a hate crime when one of a specified set of offenses is committed targeting a victim because of a perception or belief about their race, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, religion, religious practice, age, disability, or sexual orientation, or when such an act is committed as a result of that type of perception or belief. These types of crimes can target an individual, a group of individuals, or public or private property. DCJS submits hate crime incident data to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program. Information collected includes number of victims, number of offenders, type of bias motivation, and type of victim.

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    OPD Response To Resistance

    data.cityoforlando.net | Last Updated 2016-04-06T20:35:32.000Z

    Any time an Officer must respond to resistance or aggression by using certain levels of force, it is recorded and investigated by the Orlando Police Department in a Response to Resistance report. This data set comes from those reports, which are entered into OPD’s records management system. Officer involved shooting data is maintained separately by Internal Affairs and is not included in this data set. The first three fields provide basic information about the incident Incident Number - Automatically assigned at the time the incident; is created in OPD records management system. First four characters indicate the year the incident was created in the system. Incident Date Time - Day and time of the incident Incident Location - Block level address or intersection of the location The next seven fields provide information about the officer(s) involved in the incident. Officers Involved - The number of officers involved in the entire incident Officers Race - Race of the officers involved, multiple officers separated by comma (W = White, A = Asian, B = Black) Officers Ethnicity - Ethnicity of the officers involved, multiple officers separated by comma (NH = Non-hispanic, HI = Hispanic) Officers Sex - Sex of the officers involved, multiple officers separated by comma (M = Male, F = Female) Officer Battered - Did the officer report being battered during the incident Officer Injured - Did the officer report being injured during the incident Officer Medical Treatment - Did any of the officers receive medical treatment for injuries sustained during the incident The next eight fields reference what responses to resistance any officer may have used during the incident. A “Yes” indicates at least one officer used that tactic. A “No” indicates no officers used that tactic. Electronic Device Used - Commonly referred to as a Taser. This device uses propelled wires or direct contact to conduct energy to affect the sensory and motor functions of the nervous system. Chemical Agent Used - Chemical Agent, or Pepper Spray, may cause burning and tearing of the eyes, and disorientation. Tackle/ Take Down – Tactic used to gain compliance by taking a person to the ground Impact Weapon Used - Impact weapon is most commonly a baton. OPD also has a weapon called a Sage SL6 which launches rubber projectiles. Physical Strikes Made - . Strikes made with the hand, forearm, knee, or foot to assist with controlling a person. Deflation Device Used - Tire deflation devices - commonly known as "stop sticks". The use of this device is intended to deflate a vehicle’s tire(s). K9 Unit Involved - A Response to Resistance is required if a K9 bites a subject. The next seven fields provide information about the offender(s) involved in the incident. Race and ethnicity may be unknown. OPD policy is that officers not ask for information on race or ethnicity if it’s not related to the police encounter. Offenders Involved - Number of offenders involved in the entire incident Offenders Race - Race of the offenders involved, multiple offenders separated by comma (W = White, A = Asian, B = Black) Offenders Ethnicity - Ethnicity of the offenders involved, multiple offenders separated by comma (NH = Non-hispanic, HI = Hispanic) Offenders Sex - Sex of the offenders involved, multiple offenders separated by comma (M = Male, F = Female) Offender Arrested - Was the offender arrested during the incident (Not Arrested = Offender was not arrested during the incident, Misdemeanor = Offender was arrested for a misdemeanor, Felony = Offender was arrested for a Felony) Offender Injured - Did the offenders report being injured during the incident Offender Medical Treatment - Did any of the offenders receive medical treatment for injuries sustained during the incident Witnesses Involved - Count of the number of witnesses indicated in the report Status - This is an information only field to designate if the City was able to map the Incident Location

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    Community Development Block Grant Awards (CDBG)

    data.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-29T16:54:33.000Z

    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds help strengthen Maryland’s communities by expanding affordable housing opportunities, creating jobs, stabilizing neighborhoods, and improving overall quality of life. Congress created the Community Development Block Grant Program under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. The primary objective is to develop viable communities, provide decent housing and a suitable living environment, and to expand economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. The U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) oversees the Program. The CDBG Program is comprised of two parts. The Entitlement Program is directly administered by HUD and provides Federal funds to large metropolitan "entitlement" communities. The States and Small Cities Program provides Federal funds to the States and Puerto Rico (with the exception of Hawaii) who then distribute funds to "non-entitlement" counties, small cities and towns. Congress allocates funds to the program annually. The Entitlement Program receives approximately 70% of the allocation and the remaining 30% is distributed to the States and Small Cities Program. Maryland's CDBG Program is administered by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), in cooperation with the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED). Funding Levels The State of Maryland receives its share of the 30% allocated to States and Small Cities based on poverty and population statistics. Maryland's Program is divided into two major funding categories: Community Development and Economic Development. Community Development receives approximately 72% of the allocation and Economic Development receives 25%. The remaining funds are spent for State administration of the Program (2% + $100,000) and technical assistance to grantees (1%). USES OF FUNDS CDBG funded projects must meet one of three national objectives: Principally benefits persons of low- and moderate- income Eliminates slum and blight Meets an urgent need of recent origin threatens public health and safety Eligible projects generally fall into three types: Housing Public facilities (water/sewer; streets; childcare, senior or community centers; shelters) Economic development projects Over a designated three-year period, the State must cumulatively use 70% of its allocation to benefit persons of low and moderate income CDBG funded programs must meet one of three national objectives: (1) Principally benefits persons of low- and moderate- income, (2) Eliminates slum and blight, and (3) Meets an urgent need of recent origin threatens public health and safety. Eligible projects generally fall into three types: (1) Housing, (2) Public facilities (water/sewer; streets; childcare, senior or community centers; shelters), and (3) Economic development projects. http://www.neighborhoodrevitalization.org/Programs/CDBG/CDBG.aspx

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    Patient Characteristics Survey (PCS): 2013

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2017-01-03T18:40:49.000Z

    The number of persons described by survey year (2013) reported in OMH Region-specific totals (Region of Provider) and three demographic characteristics of the client served during the week of the survey: gender (Male, Female,Transgender Male, Transgender Female), age (below 5,5–12, 13–17, 18–20, 21–34, 35–44, 45–64, 65–74, 75 and above, and unknown age) and race (White only, Black/ African American Only, Multi-racial, Other and unknown race) and ethnicity (Non-Hispanic, Hispanic, and Unknown). Persons with Hispanic ethnicity are grouped as “Hispanic,” regardless of race or races reported.

  • API

    Community Development Block Grant Awards State FY 13

    data.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2016-11-30T15:33:42.000Z

    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds help strengthen Maryland’s communities by expanding affordable housing opportunities, creating jobs, stabilizing neighborhoods, and improving overall quality of life. Congress created the Community Development Block Grant Program under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. The primary objective is to develop viable communities, provide decent housing and a suitable living environment, and to expand economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. The U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) oversees the Program. The CDBG Program is comprised of two parts. The Entitlement Program is directly administered by HUD and provides Federal funds to large metropolitan "entitlement" communities. The States and Small Cities Program provides Federal funds to the States and Puerto Rico (with the exception of Hawaii) who then distribute funds to "non-entitlement" counties, small cities and towns. Congress allocates funds to the program annually. The Entitlement Program receives approximately 70% of the allocation and the remaining 30% is distributed to the States and Small Cities Program. Maryland's CDBG Program is administered by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), in cooperation with the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED). Funding Levels The State of Maryland receives its share of the 30% allocated to States and Small Cities based on poverty and population statistics. Maryland's Program is divided into two major funding categories: Community Development and Economic Development. Community Development receives approximately 72% of the allocation and Economic Development receives 25%. The remaining funds are spent for State administration of the Program (2% + $100,000) and technical assistance to grantees (1%). USES OF FUNDS CDBG funded projects must meet one of three national objectives: Principally benefits persons of low- and moderate- income Eliminates slum and blight Meets an urgent need of recent origin threatens public health and safety Eligible projects generally fall into three types: Housing Public facilities (water/sewer; streets; childcare, senior or community centers; shelters) Economic development projects Over a designated three-year period, the State must cumulatively use 70% of its allocation to benefit persons of low and moderate income CDBG funded programs must meet one of three national objectives: (1) Principally benefits persons of low- and moderate- income, (2) Eliminates slum and blight, and (3) Meets an urgent need of recent origin threatens public health and safety. Eligible projects generally fall into three types: (1) Housing, (2) Public facilities (water/sewer; streets; childcare, senior or community centers; shelters), and (3) Economic development projects. http://www.neighborhoodrevitalization.org/Programs/CDBG/CDBG.aspx