The land area of Benton Harbor, MI was 4 in 2018.

Land Area

Water Area

Land area is a measurement providing the size, in square miles, of the land portions of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau's geographic database. Land area is based on current information in the TIGER® data base, calculated for use with Census 2010.

Water Area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau's geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a two- dimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Geographic and Area Datasets Involving Benton Harbor, MI

  • API

    Beach E. coli Predictions

    data.cityofchicago.org | Last Updated 2021-09-07T04:55:05.000Z

    The Chicago Park District issues swim advisories at beaches along Chicago's Lake Michigan lakefront based on E. coli levels. This dataset shows predicted E. coli levels based on an experimental analytical modeling approach.

  • API

    Education Dashboard

    midashboard.michigan.gov | Last Updated 2017-12-18T21:24:38.000Z

    Open Michigan (OpenMichigan@michigan.gov) is the official State of Michigan account. Any items created by other user accounts are not endorsed by the State of Michigan.

  • API

    Canal System Locks

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-20T20:01:35.000Z

    The New York State Canal System is a 524 mile inland waterway that includes 57 locks, which are used to transfer vessels from a navigation pool at one elevation to another. Information provided in this data set includes the name of each lock, its phone number and specific location by mileage along the canal and geographic coordinates. This dataset excludes the Utica Harbor Lock because at this time it is not open to the public.

  • API

    Michigan Dashboard

    midashboard.michigan.gov | Last Updated 2018-01-18T19:19:48.000Z

    Open Michigan (OpenMichigan@michigan.gov) is the official State of Michigan account. Any items created by other user accounts are not endorsed by the State of Michigan.

  • API

    Alaska Harbor Seal Stocks

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2020-05-14T18:52:02.000Z

    This data layer represents the 12 uniquely identified stocks of harbor seals found in Alaskan waters. Stocks were identified by NMFS and their co-management partners, the Alaska Native Harbor Seal Commission, in 2010 based largely on genetic structure. Given the genetic samples were not obtained continuously throughout the range, a total evidence approach was used to consider additional factors such as population trends, observed harbor seal movements, and traditional Alaska Native use areas in the final designation of stock boundaries. The 12 stocks of harbor seals currently identified in Alaska are 1) the Aleutian Islands, 2) the Pribilof Islands, 3) Bristol Bay, 4) North Kodiak Island, 5) South Kodiak Island, 6) Prince William Sound, 7) Cook Inlet/Shelikof Strait, 8) Glacier Bay/Icy Strait, 9) Lynn Canal/Stephens Passage, 10) Sitka/Chatham Strait, 11) Dixon/Cape Decision and 12) Clarence Strait.

  • API

    Educational Attainment of Washington Population by Age, Race/Ethnicity/, and PUMA Region

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2019-05-16T19:13:48.000Z

    The American Community Survey (ACS) is designed to estimate the characteristic distribution of populations* and estimated counts should only be used to calculate percentages. They do not represent the actual population counts or totals. Beginning in 2019, the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) has measured educational attainment for the Roadmap Progress Report using one-year American Community Survey (ACS) data from the United States Census Bureau. These public microdata represents the most current data, but it is limited to areas with larger populations leading to some multi-county regions**. *The American Community Survey is not the official source of population counts. It is designed to show the characteristics of the nation's population and should not be used as actual population counts or housing totals for the nation, states or counties. The official population count — including population by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin — comes from the once-a-decade census, supplemented by annual population estimates (which do not typically contain educational attainment variables) from the following groups and surveys: -- Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM): https://www.ofm.wa.gov/washington-data-research/population-demographics -- US Census Decennial Census: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html and Population Estimates Program: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest.html **In prior years, WSAC used both the five-year and three-year (now discontinued) data. While the 5-year estimates provide a larger sample, they are not recommended for year to year trends and also are released later than the one-year files. Detailed information about the ACS at https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/guidance.html

  • API

    Public Water Supply Usage (2008 - Current Year)

    data.naperville.il.us | Last Updated 2021-09-14T18:26:57.000Z

    Naperville receives its water supply from Lake Michigan through the DuPage Water Commission. This dataset shows the average daily amount of water purchased by the City of Naperville in millions of gallons by month.

  • API

    Beach Lab Data

    data.cityofchicago.org | Last Updated 2021-09-09T20:00:25.000Z

    The Chicago Park District collects and analyzes water samples from beaches along Chicago’s Lake Michigan lakefront. The Chicago Park District partners with the University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Public Health Laboratory to analyze water samples using a new DNA testing method called Rapid Testing Method (qPCR analysis) which tests for Enterococci in order to monitor swimming safety. The rapid testing method (qPCR analysis) is a new method that measures levels of pathogenic DNA in beach water. Unlike the culture based test that requires up to 24 hours of processing, the new rapid testing method requires a 4-5 hours for results. The Chicago Park District can use results of the rapid test to notify the public when levels exceed UPEPA recommended levels, which is 1000* CCE. When DNA bacteria levels exceed 1000 CCE, a yellow swim advisory flag is implemented. For more information please refer to the USEPA Recreational Water Quality Criteria (http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/standards/criteria/health/recreation). Historically, the Chicago Park District used the culture based analysis method and statistical prediction models to monitor beach water quality. The culture based method tests for Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria which is an indicator species for the presence of disease-causing bacteria, viruses, and protozoans that may pose health risks to the public. This method requires 18-24 hours of processing to receive results. The Chicago Park District would use results of the culture based method to notify the public when levels exceed UPEPA recommended levels, which is 235* CFU. When bacteria levels exceed 235 CFU, a yellow swim advisory flag was implemented. This standard is still used at most beaches throughout the Great Lakes region. For more information please refer to the USEPA Recreational Water Quality Criteria. The statistical prediction model forecasted real-time Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria levels present in the water. The Chicago Park District (CPD) in partnership with the US Geological Survey, developed statistical prediction models by using weather data pulled from CPD buoys (https://data.cityofchicago.org/d/qmqz-2xku) and weather stations (https://data.cityofchicago.org/d/k7hf-8y75). The Chicago Park District would use results of the predictive model to notify the public when bacteria levels would exceed 235 CFU. When bacteria levels exceed 235 CFU, a yellow swim advisory flag was implemented. * The unit of measurement for Escherichia coli is Colony Forming Units (CFU) per 100 milliliters of water. (Culture Based Method / Statistical Prediction Model) *The unit of measuring DNA is Enterococci Calibrator Cell Equivalents (CCE) per 100 milliliters of water. (Rapid Testing Analysis)

  • API

    Energy And Environment Dashboard

    midashboard.michigan.gov | Last Updated 2017-10-19T18:29:24.000Z

    Open Michigan (OpenMichigan@michigan.gov) is the official State of Michigan account. Any items created by other user accounts are not endorsed by the State of Michigan.

  • API

    Iowa Physical and Cultural Geographic Features

    mydata.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2021-08-20T22:01:23.000Z

    This dataset contains is a list of Iowa features contained in the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). The GNIS is the Federal standard for geographic nomenclature. The U.S. Geological Survey developed the GNIS for the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, a Federal inter-agency body chartered by public law to maintain uniform feature name usage throughout the Government and to promulgate standard names to the public. The GNIS is the official repository of domestic geographic names data; the official vehicle for geographic names use by all departments of the Federal Government; and the source for applying geographic names to Federal electronic and printed products of all types. See http://geonames.usgs.gov for additional information. The Geographic Names Information System contains information about physical and cultural geographic features of all types, current and historical, but not including roads and highways. The database assigns a unique, permanent feature identifier, the Feature ID, as a standard Federal key for accessing, integrating, or reconciling feature data from multiple data sets. The GNIS collects data from a broad program of partnerships with Federal, State, and local government agencies and other authorized contributors.