The population rate of change of Rio Communities, NM was -0.13% in 2018.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Rio Communities, NM

  • API

    NYSERDA Low- to Moderate-Income New York State Census Population Analysis Dataset: Average for 2013-2015

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-11-15T22:30:02.000Z

    How does your organization use this dataset? What other NYSERDA or energy-related datasets would you like to see on Open NY? Let us know by emailing OpenNY@nyserda.ny.gov. The Low- to Moderate-Income (LMI) New York State (NYS) Census Population Analysis dataset is resultant from the LMI market database designed by APPRISE as part of the NYSERDA LMI Market Characterization Study (https://www.nyserda.ny.gov/lmi-tool). All data are derived from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) 1-year Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) files for 2013, 2014, and 2015. Each row in the LMI dataset is an individual record for a household that responded to the survey and each column is a variable of interest for analyzing the low- to moderate-income population. The LMI dataset includes: county/county group, households with elderly, households with children, economic development region, income groups, percent of poverty level, low- to moderate-income groups, household type, non-elderly disabled indicator, race/ethnicity, linguistic isolation, housing unit type, owner-renter status, main heating fuel type, home energy payment method, housing vintage, LMI study region, LMI population segment, mortgage indicator, time in home, head of household education level, head of household age, and household weight. The LMI NYS Census Population Analysis dataset is intended for users who want to explore the underlying data that supports the LMI Analysis Tool. The majority of those interested in LMI statistics and generating custom charts should use the interactive LMI Analysis Tool at https://www.nyserda.ny.gov/lmi-tool. This underlying LMI dataset is intended for users with experience working with survey data files and producing weighted survey estimates using statistical software packages (such as SAS, SPSS, or Stata).

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    COVID-19 Vaccinations by Town

    data.ct.gov | Last Updated 2021-02-25T21:24:34.000Z

    A summary of COVID-19 vaccination coverage in Connecticut by town. Records without an address could not be included in town vaccine coverage estimates. Total population estimates are based on 2019 data. SVI refers to the CDC's Social Vulnerability Index - a measure that combines 15 demographic variables to identify communities most vulnerable to negative health impacts from disasters and public health crises. Measures of social vulnerability include socioeconomic status, household composition, disability, race, ethnicity, language, and transportation limitations - among others. Towns with a "yes" in the "Has SVI tract >0.75" field are those that have at least one census tract that is in the top quartile of vulnerability (e.g., a high-need area). 34 towns in Connecticut have at least one census tract in the top quartile for vulnerability. All data in this report are preliminary; data for previous dates will be updated as new reports are received and data errors are corrected.

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    Concentrations of Protected Classes from Analysis of Impediments

    data.austintexas.gov | Last Updated 2021-02-10T00:00:23.000Z

    A new component of fair housing studies is an analysis of the opportunities residents are afforded in “racially or ethnically concentrated areas of poverty,” also called RCAPs or ECAPs. An RCAP or ECAP is a neighborhood with significant concentrations of extreme poverty and minority populations. HUD’s definition of an RCAP/ECAP is: • A Census tract that has a non‐white population of 50 percent or more AND a poverty rate of 40 percent or more; OR • A Census tract that has a non‐white population of 50 percent or more AND the poverty rate is three times the average tract poverty rate for the metro/micro area, whichever is lower. Why the 40 percent threshold? The RCAP/ECAP definition is not meant to suggest that a slightly‐lower‐than‐40 percent poverty rate is ideal or acceptable. The threshold was borne out of research that concluded a 40 percent poverty rate was the point at which a neighborhood became significantly socially and economically challenged. Conversely, research has shown that areas with up to 14 percent of poverty have no noticeable effect on community opportunity. (See Section II in City of Austin’s 2015 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice: http://www.austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/files/NHCD/Reports_Publications/1Analysis_Impediments_for_web.pdf) This dataset provides socioeconomic data on protected classes from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey on census tracts in Austin’s city limits and designates which of those tracts are considered RCAPs or ECAPs based on these socioeconomic characteristics. A map of the census tracts designated as RCAPs or ECAPs is attached to this dataset and downloadable as a pdf (see below).

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    Labor Force Demographic Characteristics by Commuting Mode Split: 2012 - 2016

    data.cambridgema.gov | Last Updated 2019-09-17T17:16:51.000Z

    This data set provides demographic and journey to work characteristics of the Cambridge Labor Force by primary mode of their journey to work. Attributes include age, presence of children, racial and ethnic minority status, vehicles available, time leaving home, time spent traveling, and annual household income. The data set originates from a special tabulation of the American Community Survey - the 2012 - 2016 version of the Census Transportation Planning Products (CTPP). The Cambridge Labor Force consist of all persons who live in Cambridge who work or are actively seeking employment. For more information on Journey to Work data in Cambridge, please see the full 2015 report (https://www.cambridgema.gov/~/media/Files/CDD/FactsandMaps/profiles/moving_forward_20150930.ashx?la=en).

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    Workforce Demographic Characteristics by Commuting Mode Split : 2012 - 2016

    data.cambridgema.gov | Last Updated 2019-09-17T17:17:39.000Z

    This data set provides demographic and journey to work characteristics of the Cambridge Workforce by primary mode of their journey to work. Attributes include age, presence of children, racial and ethnic minority status, vehicles available, time arriving at work, time spent traveling, and annual household income. The data set originates from a special tabulation of the American Community Survey - the 2012 - 2016 version of the Census Transportation Planning Products (CTPP). The Cambridge Workforce consist of all persons who work in Cambridge, regardless of home location. For more information on Journey to Work data in Cambridge, please see the full 2015 report: https://www.cambridgema.gov/~/media/Files/CDD/FactsandMaps/profiles/moving_forward_20150930.ashx?la=en).

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    COVID-19 Vaccine State Summary

    data.ct.gov | Last Updated 2021-02-25T21:22:05.000Z

    A summary of COVID-19 vaccines and vaccination coverage in Connecticut broken out into the following categories: All Ages, High-need towns (towns with SVI≥75%) All Ages, All other towns (towns with SVI<75%) All Ages, Data With Missing Address Age 75 and Older, High-need towns (towns with SVI≥75%) Age 75 and Older, All other towns (towns with SVI<75%) Age 75 and Older, Data With Missing Address SVI refers to the CDC's Social Vulnerability Index - a measure that combines 15 demographic variables to identify communities most vulnerable to negative health impacts from disasters and public health crises. Measures of social vulnerability include socioeconomic status, household composition, disability, race, ethnicity, language, and transportation limitations - among others. Towns with SVI≥75% are those that have at least one census tract that is in the top quartile of vulnerability (e.g., a high-need area). 34 towns in Connecticut have at least one census tract in the top quartile for vulnerability. All data in this report are preliminary; data for previous dates will be updated as new reports are received and data errors are corrected.

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    Uninsured Population Census Data CY 2009-2014 Human Services

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-04-01T15:15:07.000Z

    This data is pulled from the U.S. Census website. This data is for years Calendar Years 2009-2014. Product: SAHIE File Layout Overview Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program - SAHIE Filenames: SAHIE Text and SAHIE CSV files 2009 – 2014 Source: Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program, U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date: May 2016 Description: Model‐based Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) for Counties and States File Layout and Definitions The Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program was created to develop model-based estimates of health insurance coverage for counties and states. This program builds on the work of the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) program. SAHIE is only source of single-year health insurance coverage estimates for all U.S. counties. For 2008-2014, SAHIE publishes STATE and COUNTY estimates of population with and without health insurance coverage, along with measures of uncertainty, for the full cross-classification of: •5 age categories: 0-64, 18-64, 21-64, 40-64, and 50-64 •3 sex categories: both sexes, male, and female •6 income categories: all incomes, as well as income-to-poverty ratio (IPR) categories 0-138%, 0-200%, 0-250%, 0-400%, and 138-400% of the poverty threshold •4 races/ethnicities (for states only): all races/ethnicities, White not Hispanic, Black not Hispanic, and Hispanic (any race). In addition, estimates for age category 0-18 by the income categories listed above are published. Each year’s estimates are adjusted so that, before rounding, the county estimates sum to their respective state totals and for key demographics the state estimates sum to the national ACS numbers insured and uninsured. This program is partially funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC), National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection ProgramLink to a non-federal Web site (NBCCEDP). The CDC have a congressional mandate to provide screening services for breast and cervical cancer to low-income, uninsured, and underserved women through the NBCCEDP. Most state NBCCEDP programs define low-income as 200 or 250 percent of the poverty threshold. Also included are IPR categories relevant to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2014, the ACA will help families gain access to health care by allowing Medicaid to cover families with incomes less than or equal to 138 percent of the poverty line. Families with incomes above the level needed to qualify for Medicaid, but less than or equal to 400 percent of the poverty line can receive tax credits that will help them pay for health coverage in the new health insurance exchanges. We welcome your feedback as we continue to research and improve our estimation methods. The SAHIE program's age model methodology and estimates have undergone internal U.S. Census Bureau review as well as external review. See the SAHIE Methodological Review page for more details and a summary of the comments and our response. The SAHIE program models health insurance coverage by combining survey data from several sources, including: •The American Community Survey (ACS) •Demographic population estimates •Aggregated federal tax returns •Participation records for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp program •County Business Patterns •Medicaid •Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) participation records •Census 2010 Margin of error (MOE). Some ACS products provide an MOE instead of confidence intervals. An MOE is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds can be created by adding the margin of error to the estimate (for the upper bound) and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate (for the lower bound). All published ACS margins of error are based on a 90-percent confidence level.

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    2013-2017 American Community Survey Detailed Census Tract Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2019-11-25T23:04:22.000Z

    DETAILED CHARACTERISTICS OF PEOPLE AND HOUSING FOR INDIVIDUAL 2010 CENSUS TRACT PORTIONS INSIDE OR OUTSIDE KCMO - Some demographic data are from the 2010 Census while other data are from the 2013-2017 American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS replaces what until 2000 was the Long Form of the census; both have been based on surveys of a partial sample of people. The ACS sample is so small that surveys from five years must be combined to be reliable. The 2013-2017 ACS is the most recent grouping of 5 years of data. ACS data have been proportioned to conform with 2010 Census total population and total households.

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    Final Report of the Asian American Quality of Life (AAQoL)

    data.austintexas.gov | Last Updated 2021-02-09T23:57:54.000Z

    The U.S. Census defines Asian Americans as individuals having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent (U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 1997). As a broad racial category, Asian Americans are the fastest-growing minority group in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). The growth rate of 42.9% in Asian Americans between 2000 and 2010 is phenomenal given that the corresponding figure for the U.S. total population is only 9.3% (see Figure 1). Currently, Asian Americans make up 5.6% of the total U.S. population and are projected to reach 10% by 2050. It is particularly notable that Asians have recently overtaken Hispanics as the largest group of new immigrants to the U.S. (Pew Research Center, 2015). The rapid growth rate and unique challenges as a new immigrant group call for a better understanding of the social and health needs of the Asian American population.

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    2013-2017 American Community Survey Basic Census Tract Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2019-11-25T22:48:59.000Z

    BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF PEOPLE AND HOUSING FOR INDIVIDUAL 2010 CENSUS TRACT PORTIONS INSIDE OR OUTSIDE KCMO - Some demographic data are from the 2010 Census while other data are from the 2013-2017 American Community Survey - ACS. The ACS replaces what until 2000 was the Long Form of the census; both have been based on surveys of a partial sample of people. The ACS sample is so small that surveys from five years must be combined to be reliable. The 2013-2017 ACS is the most recent grouping of 5 years of data. ACS data have been proportioned to conform with 2010 Census total population and total households.