The population density of Lake Carmel, NY was 1,572 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

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Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Lake Carmel, NY

  • API

    Current Season Spring Trout Stocking

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-02-23T14:20:30.000Z

    DEC stocks more than 2.3 million catchable-size brook, brown, and rainbow trout in over 309 lakes and ponds and roughly 2,900 miles of streams across the state each spring. This dataset represents the planned stocking numbers, species and time of spring for those waters for the current fishing season. The current stocking data is updated annually in mid-March.

  • API

    Biodiversity by County - Distribution of Animals, Plants and Natural Communities

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T18:02:32.000Z

    The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) collects and maintains several datasets on the locations, distribution and status of species of plants and animals. Information on distribution by county from the following three databases was extracted and compiled into this dataset. First, the New York Natural Heritage Program biodiversity database: Rare animals, rare plants, and significant natural communities. Significant natural communities are rare or high-quality wetlands, forests, grasslands, ponds, streams, and other types of habitats. Next, the 2nd NYS Breeding Bird Atlas Project database: Birds documented as breeding during the atlas project from 2000-2005. And last, DEC’s NYS Reptile and Amphibian Database: Reptiles and amphibians; most records are from the NYS Amphibian & Reptile Atlas Project (Herp Atlas) from 1990-1999.

  • API

    Annual Population Estimates for New York State and Counties: Beginning 1970

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-05-12T15:00:45.000Z

    Resident population of New York State and counties. Estimates are based on Census counts (base population), intercensal estimates, and postcensal estimates.

  • API

    Jail Population By County: Beginning 1997

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-03-25T21:01:15.000Z

    This file details average daily census figures based on daily counts submitted by each jail to the State Commission of Correction. New York City jail population figures have been reported to the state since 2016, while data for the Non-New York City region and each county outside of the five boroughs are shown annually from 1997 onward. Data are presented in the following categories: Census, Boarded Out, Boarded In, In House, Sentenced, Civil, Federal, Technical Parole Violators, State Readies and Other Unsentenced.

  • API

    Index, Violent, Property, and Firearm Rates By County: Beginning 1990

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-10-12T14:12:17.000Z

    The Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) collects crime reports from more than 500 New York State police and sheriffs’ departments. DCJS compiles these reports as New York’s official crime statistics and submits them to the FBI under the National Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program. UCR uses standard offense definitions to count crime in localities across America regardless of variations in crime laws from state to state. In New York State, law enforcement agencies use the UCR system to report their monthly crime totals to DCJS. The UCR reporting system collects information on seven crimes classified as Index offenses which are most commonly used to gauge overall crime volume. These include the violent crimes of murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault; and the property crimes of burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft. Firearm counts are derived from taking the number of violent crimes which involve a firearm. Population data are provided every year by the FBI, based on US Census information. Police agencies may experience reporting problems that preclude accurate or complete reporting. The counts represent only crimes reported to the police but not total crimes that occurred. DCJS posts preliminary data in the spring and final data in the fall.

  • API

    Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Claims by Credit Type and Size of Earned Income: Beginning Tax Year 1994

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-05-25T20:15:12.000Z

    The Department of Taxation and Finance (the Department) annually publishes statistical information on the New York State earned income tax credit (EITC). This includes data on the separate New York City EITC and the New York State noncustodial parent EITC. Summary data are presented for all taxpayers which includes full-year New York state residents, part-year residents and nonresidents (where applicable). Data are shown for the total number of claimants and credit claimed by county and/or region for all filing statuses.

  • API

    NYCHA Development Data Book

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2020-02-08T01:20:25.000Z

    Contains the main body of the “Development Data Book” as of January 1, 2019. The Development Data Book lists all of the Authority's Developments alphabetically and includes information on the development identification numbers, program and construction type, number of apartments and rental rooms, population, number of buildings and stories, street boundaries, and political districts.

  • API

    Citizen Statewide Lake Monitoring Assessment Program (CSLAP) Lakes

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2020-12-03T23:06:01.000Z

    The dataset represents the lakes participating in the Citizen Statewide Lake Monitoring Assessment Program (CSLAP). CSLAP is a volunteer lake monitoring and education program that is managed by DEC and New York State Federation of Lake Associations (NYSFOLA). The data collected through the program is used to identify water quality issues, detect seasonal and long term patterns, and inform volunteers and lake residents about water quality conditions in their lake. The program has delivered high quality data to many DEC programs for over 25 years.The dataset catalogs CSLAP lake information; including: lake name, lake depth, public accessibility, trophic status, watershed area, elevation, lake area, water quality classification, county, town, CSLAP status, years sampled, and last year sampled.

  • API

    Local Area Unemployment Statistics: Beginning 1976

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-23T15:03:50.000Z

    The Local Area Unemployment Statistics program estimates labor force statistics (labor force, employed, unemployment, unemployment rate) for New York State civilian labor force aged 16 and up. Areas covered include, New York State, New York City, Balance of State, Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Counties, Labor Market Regions, Workforce Investment Board Areas, and cities and towns with populations of 25,000 or more. Data are not seasonally adjusted. Civilian labor force data do not include military, prison inmate, or other institutional populations.

  • API

    Recommended Fishing Lakes and Ponds

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T17:59:53.000Z

    This data displays the locations of top lakes and ponds for fishing in New York State, as determined by fisheries biologists working for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information, errors may be reflected in the data supplied. The user must be aware of data conditions and bear responsibility for the appropriate use of the information with respect to possible errors, original map scale, collection methodology, currency of data, and other conditions.