The population count of West Columbia, SC was 17,296 in 2018.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving West Columbia, SC

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    Provisional COVID-19 death counts and rates by month, jurisdiction of residence, and demographic characteristics

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2024-05-23T13:06:23.000Z

    This file contains COVID-19 death counts and rates by month and year of death, jurisdiction of residence (U.S., HHS Region) and demographic characteristics (sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, and age/race and Hispanic origin). United States death counts and rates include the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia. Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1. Number of deaths reported in this file are the total number of COVID-19 deaths received and coded as of the date of analysis and may not represent all deaths that occurred in that period. Counts of deaths occurring before or after the reporting period are not included in the file. Data during recent periods are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on the jurisdiction and cause of death. Death counts should not be compared across jurisdictions. Data timeliness varies by state. Some states report deaths on a daily basis, while other states report deaths weekly or monthly. The ten (10) United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regions include the following jurisdictions. Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont; Region 2: New Jersey, New York; Region 3: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia; Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee; Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin; Region 6: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas; Region 7: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska; Region 8: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming; Region 9: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada; Region 10: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington. Rates were calculated using the population estimates for 2021, which are estimated as of July 1, 2021 based on the Blended Base produced by the US Census Bureau in lieu of the April 1, 2020 decennial population count. The Blended Base consists of the blend of Vintage 2020 postcensal population estimates, 2020 Demographic Analysis Estimates, and 2020 Census PL 94-171 Redistricting File (see https://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/technical-documentation/methodology/2020-2021/methods-statement-v2021.pdf). Rate are based on deaths occurring in the specified week and are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the direct method (see https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr70/nvsr70-08-508.pdf). These rates differ from annual age-adjusted rates, typically presented in NCHS publications based on a full year of data and annualized weekly age-adjusted rates which have been adjusted to allow comparison with annual rates. Annualization rates presents deaths per year per 100,000 population that would be expected in a year if the observed period specific (weekly) rate prevailed for a full year. Sub-national death counts between 1-9 are suppressed in accordance with NCHS data confidentiality standards. Rates based on death counts less than 20 are suppressed in accordance with NCHS standards of reliability as specified in NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions (available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_175.pdf.).

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    Provisional COVID-19 death counts and rates, by jurisdiction of residence and demographic characteristics

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2023-11-02T14:12:56.000Z

    This file contains COVID-19 death counts and rates by jurisdiction of residence (U.S., HHS Region) and demographic characteristics (sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, and age/race and Hispanic origin). United States death counts and rates include the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia. Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1. Number of deaths reported in this file are the total number of COVID-19 deaths received and coded as of the date of analysis and may not represent all deaths that occurred in that period. Counts of deaths occurring before or after the reporting period are not included in the file. Data during recent periods are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on the jurisdiction and cause of death. Death counts should not be compared across jurisdictions. Data timeliness varies by state. Some states report deaths on a daily basis, while other states report deaths weekly or monthly. The ten (10) United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regions include the following jurisdictions. Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont; Region 2: New Jersey, New York; Region 3: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia; Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee; Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin; Region 6: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas; Region 7: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska; Region 8: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming; Region 9: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada; Region 10: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington. Rates were calculated using the population estimates for 2021, which are estimated as of July 1, 2021 based on the Blended Base produced by the US Census Bureau in lieu of the April 1, 2020 decennial population count. The Blended Base consists of the blend of Vintage 2020 postcensal population estimates, 2020 Demographic Analysis Estimates, and 2020 Census PL 94-171 Redistricting File (see https://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/technical-documentation/methodology/2020-2021/methods-statement-v2021.pdf). Rate are based on deaths occurring in the specified week and are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the direct method (see https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr70/nvsr70-08-508.pdf). These rates differ from annual age-adjusted rates, typically presented in NCHS publications based on a full year of data and annualized weekly age-adjusted rates which have been adjusted to allow comparison with annual rates. Annualization rates presents deaths per year per 100,000 population that would be expected in a year if the observed period specific (weekly) rate prevailed for a full year. Sub-national death counts between 1-9 are suppressed in accordance with NCHS data confidentiality standards. Rates based on death counts less than 20 are suppressed in accordance with NCHS standards of reliability as specified in NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions (available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_175.pdf.).

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    Provisional COVID-19 death counts, rates, and percent of total deaths, by jurisdiction of residence

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2024-05-23T13:03:33.000Z

    This file contains COVID-19 death counts, death rates, and percent of total deaths by jurisdiction of residence. The data is grouped by different time periods including 3-month period, weekly, and total (cumulative since January 1, 2020). United States death counts and rates include the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia and New York City. New York state estimates exclude New York City. Puerto Rico is included in HHS Region 2 estimates. Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1. Number of deaths reported in this file are the total number of COVID-19 deaths received and coded as of the date of analysis and may not represent all deaths that occurred in that period. Counts of deaths occurring before or after the reporting period are not included in the file. Data during recent periods are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on the jurisdiction and cause of death. Death counts should not be compared across states. Data timeliness varies by state. Some states report deaths on a daily basis, while other states report deaths weekly or monthly. The ten (10) United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regions include the following jurisdictions. Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont; Region 2: New Jersey, New York, New York City, Puerto Rico; Region 3: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia; Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee; Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin; Region 6: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas; Region 7: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska; Region 8: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming; Region 9: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada; Region 10: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington. Rates were calculated using the population estimates for 2021, which are estimated as of July 1, 2021 based on the Blended Base produced by the US Census Bureau in lieu of the April 1, 2020 decennial population count. The Blended Base consists of the blend of Vintage 2020 postcensal population estimates, 2020 Demographic Analysis Estimates, and 2020 Census PL 94-171 Redistricting File (see https://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/technical-documentation/methodology/2020-2021/methods-statement-v2021.pdf). Rates are based on deaths occurring in the specified week/month and are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the direct method (see https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr70/nvsr70-08-508.pdf). These rates differ from annual age-adjusted rates, typically presented in NCHS publications based on a full year of data and annualized weekly/monthly age-adjusted rates which have been adjusted to allow comparison with annual rates. Annualization rates presents deaths per year per 100,000 population that would be expected in a year if the observed period specific (weekly/monthly) rate prevailed for a full year. Sub-national death counts between 1-9 are suppressed in accordance with NCHS data confidentiality standards. Rates based on death counts less than 20 are suppressed in accordance with NCHS standards of reliability as specified in NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions (available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_175.pdf.).

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    1980 Census Detailed Census Tract Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2021-11-12T15:18:16.000Z

    detailed 1980 characteristics of people and housing for individual 2010 census tract portions inside or outside KCMO

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    2013-2017 American Community Survey Detailed Census Tract Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2023-03-24T19:40:40.000Z

    DETAILED CHARACTERISTICS OF PEOPLE AND HOUSING FOR INDIVIDUAL 2010 CENSUS TRACT PORTIONS INSIDE OR OUTSIDE KCMO - Some demographic data are from the 2010 Census while other data are from the 2013-2017 American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS replaces what until 2000 was the Long Form of the census; both have been based on surveys of a partial sample of people. The ACS sample is so small that surveys from five years must be combined to be reliable. The 2013-2017 ACS is the most recent grouping of 5 years of data. ACS data have been proportioned to conform with 2010 Census total population and total households.

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    Educational Attainment of Washington Population by Age, Race/Ethnicity/, and PUMA Region

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2019-05-16T19:13:48.000Z

    The American Community Survey (ACS) is designed to estimate the characteristic distribution of populations* and estimated counts should only be used to calculate percentages. They do not represent the actual population counts or totals. Beginning in 2019, the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) has measured educational attainment for the Roadmap Progress Report using one-year American Community Survey (ACS) data from the United States Census Bureau. These public microdata represents the most current data, but it is limited to areas with larger populations leading to some multi-county regions**. *The American Community Survey is not the official source of population counts. It is designed to show the characteristics of the nation's population and should not be used as actual population counts or housing totals for the nation, states or counties. The official population count — including population by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin — comes from the once-a-decade census, supplemented by annual population estimates (which do not typically contain educational attainment variables) from the following groups and surveys: -- Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM): https://www.ofm.wa.gov/washington-data-research/population-demographics -- US Census Decennial Census: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html and Population Estimates Program: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest.html **In prior years, WSAC used both the five-year and three-year (now discontinued) data. While the 5-year estimates provide a larger sample, they are not recommended for year to year trends and also are released later than the one-year files. Detailed information about the ACS at https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/guidance.html

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    2015-2019 American Community Survey Detailed Census Tract Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2023-03-24T21:11:36.000Z

    DETAILED CHARACTERISTICS OF PEOPLE AND HOUSING FOR INDIVIDUAL 2010 CENSUS TRACT PORTIONS INSIDE OR OUTSIDE KCMO - Some demographic data are from the 2010 Census while other data are from the 2015-2019 American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS replaces what until 2000 was the Long Form of the census; both have been based on surveys of a partial sample of people. The ACS sample is so small that surveys from five years must be combined to be reliable. The 2015-2019 ACS is the most recent grouping of 5 years of data. ACS data have been proportioned to conform with 2010 Census total population and total households.

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    2015-2019 American Community Survey Basic Census Tract Data

    data.kcmo.org | Last Updated 2023-03-24T21:11:24.000Z

    BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF PEOPLE AND HOUSING FOR INDIVIDUAL 2010 CENSUS TRACT PORTIONS INSIDE OR OUTSIDE KCMO - Some demographic data are from the 2010 Census while other data are from the 2015-2019 American Community Survey - ACS. The ACS replaces what until 2000 was the Long Form of the census; both have been based on surveys of a partial sample of people. The ACS sample is so small that surveys from five years must be combined to be reliable. The 2015-2019 ACS is the most recent grouping of 5 years of data. ACS data have been proportioned to conform with 2010 Census total population and total households.

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    Uninsured Population Census Data CY 2009-2014 Human Services

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2022-10-18T14:19:11.000Z

    This data is pulled from the U.S. Census website. This data is for years Calendar Years 2009-2014. Product: SAHIE File Layout Overview Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program - SAHIE Filenames: SAHIE Text and SAHIE CSV files 2009 – 2014 Source: Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program, U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date: May 2016 Description: Model‐based Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) for Counties and States File Layout and Definitions The Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program was created to develop model-based estimates of health insurance coverage for counties and states. This program builds on the work of the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) program. SAHIE is only source of single-year health insurance coverage estimates for all U.S. counties. For 2008-2014, SAHIE publishes STATE and COUNTY estimates of population with and without health insurance coverage, along with measures of uncertainty, for the full cross-classification of: •5 age categories: 0-64, 18-64, 21-64, 40-64, and 50-64 •3 sex categories: both sexes, male, and female •6 income categories: all incomes, as well as income-to-poverty ratio (IPR) categories 0-138%, 0-200%, 0-250%, 0-400%, and 138-400% of the poverty threshold •4 races/ethnicities (for states only): all races/ethnicities, White not Hispanic, Black not Hispanic, and Hispanic (any race). In addition, estimates for age category 0-18 by the income categories listed above are published. Each year’s estimates are adjusted so that, before rounding, the county estimates sum to their respective state totals and for key demographics the state estimates sum to the national ACS numbers insured and uninsured. This program is partially funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC), National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection ProgramLink to a non-federal Web site (NBCCEDP). The CDC have a congressional mandate to provide screening services for breast and cervical cancer to low-income, uninsured, and underserved women through the NBCCEDP. Most state NBCCEDP programs define low-income as 200 or 250 percent of the poverty threshold. Also included are IPR categories relevant to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2014, the ACA will help families gain access to health care by allowing Medicaid to cover families with incomes less than or equal to 138 percent of the poverty line. Families with incomes above the level needed to qualify for Medicaid, but less than or equal to 400 percent of the poverty line can receive tax credits that will help them pay for health coverage in the new health insurance exchanges. We welcome your feedback as we continue to research and improve our estimation methods. The SAHIE program's age model methodology and estimates have undergone internal U.S. Census Bureau review as well as external review. See the SAHIE Methodological Review page for more details and a summary of the comments and our response. The SAHIE program models health insurance coverage by combining survey data from several sources, including: •The American Community Survey (ACS) •Demographic population estimates •Aggregated federal tax returns •Participation records for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp program •County Business Patterns •Medicaid •Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) participation records •Census 2010 Margin of error (MOE). Some ACS products provide an MOE instead of confidence intervals. An MOE is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds can be created by adding the margin of error to the estimate (for the upper bound) and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate (for the lower bound). All published ACS margins of error are based on a 90-percent confidence level.

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    National Immunization Survey Adult COVID Module (NIS-ACM): COVIDVaxViews| Data | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (cdc.gov)

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2024-05-23T18:49:19.000Z

    • National Immunization Survey Adult COVID Module (NIS-ACM): CDC is providing information on the Updated 2023-24 COVID-19 vaccine confidence to supplement vaccine administration data. These data represent trends in vaccination status and intent, and other behavioral indicators, by demographics and other characteristics. • The data start in October 2023. • The archived data can be found here: