The land area of Red Bank, TN was 7 in 2018.

Land Area

Water Area

Land area is a measurement providing the size, in square miles, of the land portions of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau's geographic database. Land area is based on current information in the TIGER® data base, calculated for use with Census 2010.

Water Area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau's geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a two- dimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Geographic and Area Datasets Involving Red Bank, TN

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    Hamilton County Health Department COVID-19 Data

    internal.chattadata.org | Last Updated 2020-10-10T05:10:05.000Z

    Updated daily from the Hamilton County Health Department. Data downloaded from Houser, Jesse A. “Hamilton County, Tennessee COVID-19 Dataset.” COVID-19 in Hamilton County, TN, 2020, sites.google.com/view/hamiltoncounty-tn-covid19/data

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    TN Counties COVID-19 Vaccinations

    internal.chattadata.org | Last Updated 2021-09-25T22:17:47.000Z

    Data pulled from THD website https://www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov/data/downloadable-datasets.html

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    Emerging and Sustainable Cities Initiative: Indicators

    mydata.iadb.org | Last Updated 2018-12-19T00:50:14.000Z

    The Urban Dashboard allows to explore and compare more than 150 quantitative indicators, public opinion polls and interactive maps of intermediate cities in Latin America and the Caribbean. These are cities that have an outstanding economic and population growth, and receive technical assistance from the Emerging and Sustainable Cities Initiative (ESCI) of the IDB. This dataset was created to feed the urbandashboard.org platform. It contains all the cities indicators, unit of measure and ranges.<br><br><b>Click here to access the data: https://mydata.iadb.org/idb/dataset/hg7w-u675</b></br></br>

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    Condition of Non-Tidal Wetlands

    data.delaware.gov | Last Updated 2020-08-27T14:34:14.000Z

    Includes all data collected to date about non-tidal wetland condition in Delaware. Data is collected in the field using the Delaware Rapid Assessment Procedure (DERAP).

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    Chattanooga Historic Red Lining

    internal.chattadata.org | Last Updated 2019-10-03T19:50:09.000Z

    The Federal government's Home Owners' Loan Corporation between 1935 and 1940, used data and evaluations organized by local real estate professionals--lenders, developers, and real estate appraisers--in each city, assigned grades to residential neighborhoods that reflected their "mortgage security" that would then be visualized on color-coded maps. Neighborhoods receiving the highest grade of "A"--colored green on the maps--were deemed minimal risks for banks and other mortgage lenders when they were determining who should received loans and which areas in the city were safe investments. Those receiving the lowest grade of "D," colored red, were considered "hazardous." Conservative, responsible lenders, in HOLC judgment, would "refuse to make loans in these areas [or] only on a conservative basis." HOLC created area descriptions to help to organize the data they used to assign the grades. Among that information was the neighborhood's quality of housing, the recent history of sale and rent values, and, crucially, the racial and ethnic identity and class of residents that served as the basis of the neighborhood's grade. These maps and their accompanying documentation helped set the rules for nearly a century of real estate practice that has systematically disenfranchised communities of color.

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    Water Quality Protection Charges

    data.montgomerycountymd.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T05:07:12.000Z

    The Water Quality Protection Charge (WQPC) is a line item on your property tax bill. WQPC funds many of the County's clean water initiatives including: • Restoration of eroded stream banks • Upgrades to stormwater ponds • Storm drain cleaning and maintenance • Stream monitoring • Litter control programs • Stormwater facility maintenance • Installation of rain barrels, rain gardens and green roofs The WQPC is calculated based on how much of your property is impervious (does not allow rain to be absorbed into the ground). As the county is developed, more area is covered in impervious concrete, asphalt, driveways, and buildings. Instead, that stormwater collects pollutants and runs off of the impervious surfaces causing damage to streams, rivers and the Chesapeake Bay. This is also known as stormwater pollution. The clean water initiatives funded by the WQPC remediate the environmental damage caused by stormwater pollution. Further, the WQPC funds programs that are needed to meet the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit from the state of Maryland. Update Frequency : Annually

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    hubNashville (311) Service Requests

    data.nashville.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-25T07:40:12.000Z

    Details of service requests to hubNashville, Metro Nashville government's comprehensive customer service system. Residents or visitors can connect with a Metro representative to request services, share feedback, or ask questions by calling 311 (615-862-5000 if out of county when making the call) or by visiting https://hub.nashville.gov.

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    Average Monthly Residential Water Consumption by City Block Area 2016

    data.edmonton.ca | Last Updated 2019-07-17T16:58:13.000Z

    This dataset provides the average (annual, winter, summer) residential metered water consumption (2016) within 400 m x 400m hexagons (approximately two city blocks) provided in m3/month for the City of Edmonton. Average monthly residential winter water consumption is the average consumption of the following months: January, February, March, April, October, November and December. Average monthly residential summer water consumption is the average consumption of the following months: May, June, July, August and September. Only those hexagons that contain at least ten accounts are illustrated to ensure customer privacy. Residential consumption refers to water used primarily for domestic purposes, where no more than four separate dwelling units are metered by a single water meter. Thematic mapping is based on the following ranges: 0-10 m3/month – orange 10-20 m3/month – green 20-30 m3/month – purple 30-35 m3/month – blue 35-60 m3/month – red 60 m3/month and up – maroon

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    Average Monthly Residential Water Consumption by City Block Area 2017

    data.edmonton.ca | Last Updated 2019-07-17T17:08:47.000Z

    This dataset provides the average (annual, winter, summer) residential metered water consumption (2017) within 400 m x 400m hexagons (approximately two city blocks) provided in m3/month for the City of Edmonton. Average monthly residential winter water consumption is the average consumption of the following months: January, February, March, April, October, November and December. Average monthly residential summer water consumption is the average consumption of the following months: May, June, July, August and September. Only those hexagons that contain at least ten accounts are illustrated to ensure customer privacy. Residential consumption refers to water used primarily for domestic purposes, where no more than four separate dwelling units are metered by a single water meter. Thematic mapping is based on the following ranges: 0-10 m3/month – orange 10-20 m3/month – green 20-30 m3/month – purple 30-35 m3/month – blue 35-60 m3/month – red 60 m3/month and up – maroon Note: For 2017, there were no areas where the consumption was 60 m3/month and up - thus, the maroon colour would not appear in the legend.

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    Average Monthly Residential Water Consumption by Neighbourhood 2017

    data.edmonton.ca | Last Updated 2019-07-17T17:08:16.000Z

    This dataset provides the average (annual, winter, summer) residential metered water consumption (2017) within residential neighbourhoods provided in m3/month for the City of Edmonton. Average monthly residential winter water consumption is the average consumption of the following months: January, February, March, April, October, November and December. Average monthly residential summer water consumption is the average consumption of the following months: May, June, July, August and September. Only those residential neighbourhoods with at least ten accounts are illustrated to ensure customer privacy. Residential consumption refers to water used primarily for domestic purposes, where no more than four separate dwelling units are metered by a single water meter. Thematic mapping is based on the following ranges: 0-10 m3/month – orange 10-20 m3/month – green 20-30 m3/month – purple 30-35 m3/month – blue 35-60 m3/month – red 60 m3/month and up – maroon Note: For 2017, there were no areas where the consumption was 60 m3/month and up - thus, the maroon colour would not appear in the legend.