The annual personal income of Kansas City Metro Area (MO-KS) was $45,613 in 2014.

Annual Personal Income in US$

Per capita personal income was computed using Census Bureau midyear population estimates. Estimates for 2010-2014 reflect county population estimates available as of March 2015. All dollar estimates are in current dollars (not adjusted for inflation).

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis | Data Source | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Economy and Personal Income Datasets Involving Kansas City Metro Area (MO-KS)

  • API

    Annual Personal Income for State of Iowa

    mydata.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2024-04-08T22:44:11.000Z

    This dataset provides annual personal income estimates for State of Iowa produced by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis beginning in 1997. Data includes the following estimates: personal income, per capita personal income, wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, private nonfarm earnings, compensation of employees, average compensation per job, and private nonfarm compensation. Personal income is defined as the sum of wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, proprietors’ income, dividends, interest, and rent, and personal current transfer receipts, less contributions for government social insurance. Personal income for Iowa is the income received by, or on behalf of all persons residing in Iowa, regardless of the duration of residence, except for foreign nationals employed by their home governments in Iowa. Per capita personal income is personal income divided by the Census Bureau’s annual midyear (July 1) population estimates. Wages and salaries is defined as the remuneration receivable by employees (including corporate officers) from employers for the provision of labor services. It includes commissions, tips, and bonuses; employee gains from exercising stock options; and pay-in-kind. Judicial fees paid to jurors and witnesses are classified as wages and salaries. Wages and salaries are measured before deductions, such as social security contributions, union dues, and voluntary employee contributions to defined contribution pension plans. Supplements to wages and salaries consists of employer contributions for government social insurance and employer contributions for employee pension and insurance funds. Private nonfarm earnings is the sum of wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, and nonfarm proprietors' income, excluding farm and government. Compensation to employees is the total remuneration, both monetary and in kind, payable by employers to employees in return for their work during the period. It consists of wages and salaries and of supplements to wages and salaries. Compensation is presented on an accrual basis - that is, it reflects compensation liabilities incurred by the employer in a given period regardless of when the compensation is actually received by the employee. Average compensation per job is compensation of employees divided by total full-time and part-time wage and salary employment. Private nonfarm compensation is the sum of wages and salaries and supplements to wages and salaries, excluding farm and government. More terms and definitions are available on https://apps.bea.gov/regional/definitions/.

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    Vital Signs: Jobs by Wage Level - Metro

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:41:01.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Wage Level (EQ1) FULL MEASURE NAME Distribution of jobs by low-, middle-, and high-wage occupations LAST UPDATED January 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by wage level refers to the distribution of jobs by low-, middle- and high-wage occupations. In the San Francisco Bay Area, low-wage occupations have a median hourly wage of less than 80% of the regional median wage; median wages for middle-wage occupations range from 80% to 120% of the regional median wage, and high-wage occupations have a median hourly wage above 120% of the regional median wage. DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department OES (2001-2017) http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/data/oes-employment-and-wages.html American Community Survey (2001-2017) http://api.census.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Jobs are determined to be low-, middle-, or high-wage based on the median hourly wage of their occupational classification in the most recent year. Low-wage jobs are those that pay below 80% of the regional median wage. Middle-wage jobs are those that pay between 80% and 120% of the regional median wage. High-wage jobs are those that pay above 120% of the regional median wage. Regional median hourly wages are estimated from the American Community Survey and are published on the Vital Signs Income indicator page. For the national context analysis, occupation wage classifications are unique to each metro area. A low-wage job in New York, for instance, may be a middle-wage job in Miami. For the Bay Area in 2017, the median hourly wage for low-wage occupations was less than $20.86 per hour. For middle-wage jobs, the median ranged from $20.86 to $31.30 per hour; and for high-wage jobs, the median wage was above $31.30 per hour. Occupational employment and wage information comes from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program. Regional and subregional data is published by the California Employment Development Department. Metro data is published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The OES program collects data on wage and salary workers in nonfarm establishments to produce employment and wage estimates for some 800 occupations. Data from non-incorporated self-employed persons are not collected, and are not included in these estimates. Wage estimates represent a three-year rolling average. Due to changes in reporting during the analysis period, subregion data from the EDD OES have been aggregated to produce geographies that can be compared over time. West Bay is San Mateo, San Francisco, and Marin counties. North Bay is Sonoma, Solano and Napa counties. East Bay is Alameda and Contra Costa counties. South Bay is Santa Clara County from 2001-2004 and Santa Clara and San Benito counties from 2005-2017. Due to changes in occupation classifications during the analysis period, all occupations have been reassigned to 2010 SOC codes. For pre-2009 reporting years, all employment in occupations that were split into two or more 2010 SOC occupations are assigned to the first 2010 SOC occupation listed in the crosswalk table provided by the Census Bureau. This method assumes these occupations always fall in the same wage category, and sensitivity analysis of this reassignment method shows this is true in most cases. In order to use OES data for time series analysis, several steps were taken to handle missing wage or employment data. For some occupations, such as airline pilots and flight attendants, no wage information was provided and these were removed from the analysis. Other occupations did not record a median hourly wage (mostly due to irregular work hours) but did record an annual average wage. Nearly all these occupations were in education (i.e. teachers). In this case, a 2080 hour-work year was assumed and [annual average wage/2080] was used as a proxy for median income. Most of these occupations were classified as high-wage, thus dispelling c

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    Vital Signs: Jobs by Wage Level - Subregion

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:41:25.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Wage Level (EQ1) FULL MEASURE NAME Distribution of jobs by low-, middle-, and high-wage occupations LAST UPDATED January 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by wage level refers to the distribution of jobs by low-, middle- and high-wage occupations. In the San Francisco Bay Area, low-wage occupations have a median hourly wage of less than 80% of the regional median wage; median wages for middle-wage occupations range from 80% to 120% of the regional median wage, and high-wage occupations have a median hourly wage above 120% of the regional median wage. DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department OES (2001-2017) http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/data/oes-employment-and-wages.html American Community Survey (2001-2017) http://api.census.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Jobs are determined to be low-, middle-, or high-wage based on the median hourly wage of their occupational classification in the most recent year. Low-wage jobs are those that pay below 80% of the regional median wage. Middle-wage jobs are those that pay between 80% and 120% of the regional median wage. High-wage jobs are those that pay above 120% of the regional median wage. Regional median hourly wages are estimated from the American Community Survey and are published on the Vital Signs Income indicator page. For the national context analysis, occupation wage classifications are unique to each metro area. A low-wage job in New York, for instance, may be a middle-wage job in Miami. For the Bay Area in 2017, the median hourly wage for low-wage occupations was less than $20.86 per hour. For middle-wage jobs, the median ranged from $20.86 to $31.30 per hour; and for high-wage jobs, the median wage was above $31.30 per hour. Occupational employment and wage information comes from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program. Regional and subregional data is published by the California Employment Development Department. Metro data is published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The OES program collects data on wage and salary workers in nonfarm establishments to produce employment and wage estimates for some 800 occupations. Data from non-incorporated self-employed persons are not collected, and are not included in these estimates. Wage estimates represent a three-year rolling average. Due to changes in reporting during the analysis period, subregion data from the EDD OES have been aggregated to produce geographies that can be compared over time. West Bay is San Mateo, San Francisco, and Marin counties. North Bay is Sonoma, Solano and Napa counties. East Bay is Alameda and Contra Costa counties. South Bay is Santa Clara County from 2001-2004 and Santa Clara and San Benito counties from 2005-2017. Due to changes in occupation classifications during the analysis period, all occupations have been reassigned to 2010 SOC codes. For pre-2009 reporting years, all employment in occupations that were split into two or more 2010 SOC occupations are assigned to the first 2010 SOC occupation listed in the crosswalk table provided by the Census Bureau. This method assumes these occupations always fall in the same wage category, and sensitivity analysis of this reassignment method shows this is true in most cases. In order to use OES data for time series analysis, several steps were taken to handle missing wage or employment data. For some occupations, such as airline pilots and flight attendants, no wage information was provided and these were removed from the analysis. Other occupations did not record a median hourly wage (mostly due to irregular work hours) but did record an annual average wage. Nearly all these occupations were in education (i.e. teachers). In this case, a 2080 hour-work year was assumed and [annual average wage/2080] was used as a proxy for median income. Most of these occupations were classified as high-wage, thus dispelling c

  • API

    Vital Signs: Jobs by Wage Level - Region

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:41:27.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Jobs by Wage Level (EQ1) FULL MEASURE NAME Distribution of jobs by low-, middle-, and high-wage occupations LAST UPDATED January 2019 DESCRIPTION Jobs by wage level refers to the distribution of jobs by low-, middle- and high-wage occupations. In the San Francisco Bay Area, low-wage occupations have a median hourly wage of less than 80% of the regional median wage; median wages for middle-wage occupations range from 80% to 120% of the regional median wage, and high-wage occupations have a median hourly wage above 120% of the regional median wage. DATA SOURCE California Employment Development Department OES (2001-2017) http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/data/oes-employment-and-wages.html American Community Survey (2001-2017) http://api.census.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Jobs are determined to be low-, middle-, or high-wage based on the median hourly wage of their occupational classification in the most recent year. Low-wage jobs are those that pay below 80% of the regional median wage. Middle-wage jobs are those that pay between 80% and 120% of the regional median wage. High-wage jobs are those that pay above 120% of the regional median wage. Regional median hourly wages are estimated from the American Community Survey and are published on the Vital Signs Income indicator page. For the national context analysis, occupation wage classifications are unique to each metro area. A low-wage job in New York, for instance, may be a middle-wage job in Miami. For the Bay Area in 2017, the median hourly wage for low-wage occupations was less than $20.86 per hour. For middle-wage jobs, the median ranged from $20.86 to $31.30 per hour; and for high-wage jobs, the median wage was above $31.30 per hour. Occupational employment and wage information comes from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program. Regional and subregional data is published by the California Employment Development Department. Metro data is published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The OES program collects data on wage and salary workers in nonfarm establishments to produce employment and wage estimates for some 800 occupations. Data from non-incorporated self-employed persons are not collected, and are not included in these estimates. Wage estimates represent a three-year rolling average. Due to changes in reporting during the analysis period, subregion data from the EDD OES have been aggregated to produce geographies that can be compared over time. West Bay is San Mateo, San Francisco, and Marin counties. North Bay is Sonoma, Solano and Napa counties. East Bay is Alameda and Contra Costa counties. South Bay is Santa Clara County from 2001-2004 and Santa Clara and San Benito counties from 2005-2017. Due to changes in occupation classifications during the analysis period, all occupations have been reassigned to 2010 SOC codes. For pre-2009 reporting years, all employment in occupations that were split into two or more 2010 SOC occupations are assigned to the first 2010 SOC occupation listed in the crosswalk table provided by the Census Bureau. This method assumes these occupations always fall in the same wage category, and sensitivity analysis of this reassignment method shows this is true in most cases. In order to use OES data for time series analysis, several steps were taken to handle missing wage or employment data. For some occupations, such as airline pilots and flight attendants, no wage information was provided and these were removed from the analysis. Other occupations did not record a median hourly wage (mostly due to irregular work hours) but did record an annual average wage. Nearly all these occupations were in education (i.e. teachers). In this case, a 2080 hour-work year was assumed and [annual average wage/2080] was used as a proxy for median income. Most of these occupations were classified as high-wage, thus dispelling c

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    CMS Skilled Nursing Facility Cost Report

    fusioncenter.nhit.org | Last Updated 2022-06-24T17:14:43.000Z

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    Skilled Nursing Center Costs Utah 2019

    opendata.utah.gov | Last Updated 2022-11-09T19:20:27.000Z

    The Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Cost Report dataset is a public use file that provides select measures from the skilled nursing facility annual cost report. This data includes provider information such as facility characteristics, utilization data, cost and charges by cost center (in total and for Medicare), Medicare settlement data, and financial statement data organized by CMS Certification Number.

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    Skilled Nursing Facility Costs DataViz

    opendata.utah.gov | Last Updated 2023-10-12T00:56:22.000Z

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    LACERS Key Facts and Figures from Year End Financial Reports

    data.lacity.org | Last Updated 2024-01-02T17:13:26.000Z

    This is a collection of data reported in LACERS Annual Financial Report since Fiscal Year End 1990, which includes selective data from the yearly Actuarial Valuation, Audited Financial Statement, and Investments Reporting generated after the end of each Fiscal Year. Average Healthcare Subsidies data are the exception and are pulled from Health division dashboards at fiscal year end. Yearly and multi-year investment return averages are based on time-weighted reporting. Some figures are rounded, as reported in the documents referenced above. Actuarial Valuations and Annual Financial Report documents, in electronic form, can be found on the LACERS.org website at https://www.lacers.org/reports-and-statistics.

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    Historical personal income tax return statistics by county and tax year

    data.oregon.gov | Last Updated 2023-12-06T19:49:42.000Z

    A historical tabulation of selected tax return statistics by counties and other geographic areas reported every year by the Research Section at the Department of Revenue. Source data comes from Tables A through D in the "Returns by county, other states, and city" spreadsheet that accompanies every annual Personal Income Tax publication. Data are reported for all 36 Oregon counties as well as five areas outside Oregon, based on the mailing address on the return when it was filed. Clark County, Washington, is reported separately from the remainder of Washington because so many Clark County residents work in Portland. Idaho and California also have individual tables. Returns from all other states (and outside of the US) are grouped together as "Other". For full-year resident returns, Oregon AGI is the same as federal AGI. For part-year resident and nonresident returns, Oregon AGI is determined from Oregon sourced income and adjustments. Note that some rows have blank cells indicating that data has been omitted, often for disclosure reasons. See "data limitations" below.

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    Skilled Nursing Center Costs Utah County 2016_2019

    opendata.utah.gov | Last Updated 2023-02-10T03:14:08.000Z