The GDP per capita of San Jose Metro Area (CA) was $119,695 in 2016.

GDP

Real (inflation adjusted) GDP per Capita over time.

Change in GDP

Annual change in real GDP.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a measure of the value of all goods and services produced in a region minus the value of the goods and services used up in production. Real GDP is adjusted for changes in the value of money (inflation and deflation) so that values can be compared between years. Data is available for U.S. states and metropolitan areas.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis | Data Source | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Economy and Gross Domestic Product Datasets Involving San Jose Metro Area (CA)

  • API

    Economy and Education Indicators, San Bernardino County and California, 2005-2014

    data.communityvitalsigns.org | Last Updated 2016-03-01T19:43:41.000Z

    This dataset contains high school graduation rates from 2010-2014 for San Bernardino County and California (from California Department of Education, California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System, Cohort Outcome Data by Gender Report), and percentage of the adult population age 25 years and older with a bachelor's degree or higher, median household income in the past 12 months (adjusted annually for inflation), and unemployment rate for the population age 16 years and older, for San Bernardino County and California from 2005-2014 (U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, Tables B19013, S1501 and S2301).

  • API

    Newborn Screening Disorders by California Region, 2009-2015

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-12T16:05:18.000Z

    This table presents counts of disorders that have been diagnosed by the California Newborn Screening program during the five-year period from 2009 through 2015. Counts of cases are presented by California regions. Disorder counts were suppressed where counts of disorders was <6 in any individual category. The regions are combinations of counties having over 50,000 births: except for Los Angeles individual county data is not reported (see attached Data Dictionary). The disorders included are part of the core recommended panel put forth by the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) established under the Section 1111 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, 42 U.S.C. 300b-10, as amended in the Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act of 2008. The Committee recommends that every state newborn screening program include a uniform screening panel that currently includes 31 core disorders; the Genetic Disease Screening program screens for all of the core conditions excluding newborn hearing loss screening and critical congenital heart disease screening which are programs administered by the Department of Health Care Services. Not all disorders are displayed due to small numbers. For details of the disorders diagnosed, please refer to the attachment: Recommended Uniform Screening Panel.pdf; for details of how the regions are broken down by California counties see attachment: California Regions Break-Out by County.xlsx. Three types of sickle cell-related hemoglobinopathies (Sickle Beta+ Thalassemia, Sickle S/S Disease and Sickle S/C Disease) were combined into one group called "Sickle Cell Disease".

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    Historical Data For Unemployment Rate In San Mateo County

    performance.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2013-12-19T21:17:20.000Z

    Monthly historical data for the unemployment rate (not seasonally adjusted) in San Mateo County from 1990-2013.

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    Presidential Election Turnout San Mateo County 2004

    data.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2014-07-15T21:32:17.000Z

    Election turnout in San Mateo County for the 2004 Presidential Election. Source provided by the California Secretary of State: http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/elections

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    Presidential Election Turnout San Mateo County 2008

    data.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2014-07-18T21:28:41.000Z

    Election turnout in San Mateo County for the 2008 Preseidential Election. Source provided by the California Secretary of State: http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/elections

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    San Mateo County and Other Bay Area Counties Annual Unemployment Rate (not seasonally adjusted) 2000-2015

    performance.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2016-08-03T17:48:04.000Z

    San Mateo County and Other Bay Area Counties Annual Unemployment Rate (not seasonally adjusted) for years 2000-2013 Compared to Marin County, San Francisco County, Santa Clara County, and the State of California. Data for years 2000-2015 is non-preliminary.

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    Housing Crowding 2006-2010

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-06-14T20:10:39.000Z

    This table contains data on the percent of household overcrowding (> 1.0 persons per room) and severe overcrowding (> 1.5 persons per room)for California, its regions, counties, and cities/towns. Data is from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Consolidated Planning Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS). The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OHE/Pages/Healthy-Communities-Data-and-Indicators-Project-(HCI).aspx). Residential crowding has been linked to an increased risk of infection from communicable diseases, a higher prevalence of respiratory ailments, and greater vulnerability to homelessness among the poor. Residential crowding reflects demographic and socioeconomic conditions. Older-adult immigrant and recent immigrant communities, families with low income and renter-occupied households are more likely to experience household crowding. A form of residential overcrowding known as "doubling up"—co-residence with family members or friends for economic reasons—is the most commonly reported prior living situation for families and individuals before the onset of homelessness. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the Attachments.

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    Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2018-01-22T20:23:37.000Z

    The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey collects data from a sample of establishments and calculates employment and wage estimates by occupation, industry, and geographic area. The semiannual survey covers all non-farm industries. Data are collected by the Employment Development Department in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor. The OES Program estimates employment and wages for over 800 occupations from an annual sample of approx. 34,000 California employers. It also produces employment and wage estimates for statewide, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), and Balance of State areas. Estimates are a snapshot in time and should not be used as a time series.

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    Living Wage

    chhs.data.ca.gov | Last Updated 2017-02-17T22:39:34.000Z

    This table contains data on the living wage and the percent of families with incomes below the living wage for California, its counties, regions and cities/towns. Living wage is the wage needed to cover basic family expenses (basic needs budget) plus all relevant taxes; it does not include publicly provided income or housing assistance. The percent of families below the living wage was calculated using data from the Living Wage Calculator (http://livingwage.mit.edu/) and the U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey. The table is part of a series of indicators in the Healthy Communities Data and Indicators Project of the Office of Health Equity (http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/HealthyCommunityIndicators.aspx). The living wage is the wage or annual income that covers the cost of the bare necessities of life for a worker and his/her family. These necessities include housing, transportation, food, childcare, health care, and payment of taxes. Low income populations and non-white race/ethnic have disproportionately lower wages, poorer housing, and higher levels of food insecurity. More information about the data table and a data dictionary can be found in the About/Attachments section.

  • API

    Exhausted Claims By County (All Programs)

    data.edd.ca.gov | Last Updated 2018-04-27T23:43:50.000Z

    "∙ The data provided is the number of Unemployment Insurance (UI) claims that have exhausted, regardless of the program. The data includes exhaustion counts for the regular UI and the federal extended programs.  The data counts the number of individuals who ran out of benefits in a specific program who may or may not qualify for additional benefits. For example, individuals who have exhausted a regular UI claim may qualify for a federal extension. Individuals who have exhausted all available benefits are also included in the data. The data is representative of those claims that were processed during the month and does not necessarily represent the month the final payment was made in. For example, if a claimant is entitled to benefits for the week-ending January 30, 2010, the claim might not get processed until early February and that count would display in the February data. There are a small percentage of claimants that could go back onto a training extension even after exhausting their FED-ED claim. " ∙ The data by county represents the mailing address given by the claimant at the time of filing for UI.  It is possible that an individual can reside in a different county than their mailing address.  Also, this information does not represent the county where the individual worked.  It is also possible that a claimant could have moved or changed their mailing address after filing for UI which would not be reflected here. Data for claimants residing outside of California but collecting benefits are not included in these figures nor are invalid addresses in California where a county cannot be determined. ∙ Data includes the regular UI program and the federal extended benefit programs. The Federal extended benefit programs are: ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 1 - California began paying benefits in July 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 2 - California began paying benefits in January 2009, payments retroactive to November 2008. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 3 - California began paying benefits in December 2009, payments retroactive to November 2009. ∙ Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) Tier 4 - California began paying benefits in January 2010, payments retroactive to December 2009. ∙ FED-ED - California began paying benefits May 2009, payments retroactive to February 2009. ∙ Data may include multiple counts for the same individual. For example, a claimant could have exhausted their Regular UI claim in January and then exhausted their EUC Tier I claim in June.