The population rate of change of San Luis Obispo Metro Area (CA) was 0.48% in 2018.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving San Luis Obispo Metro Area (CA)

  • API

    CHSA - ECON -- Food Insecurity --- 2-Year Dissected

    healthstat.dph.sbcounty.gov | Last Updated 2019-03-13T19:07:43.000Z

    Percent of People who Cannot Afford to Feed Themselves Sufficiently. U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, December Supplement (AKA USDA Food Security Supplement). Dissected by Year, Geographic Area, Age Category, and Race/Ethnicity.

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    Vital Signs: Migration - Bay Area

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:40:04.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Migration (EQ4) FULL MEASURE NAME Migration flows LAST UPDATED December 2018 DESCRIPTION Migration refers to the movement of people from one location to another, typically crossing a county or regional boundary. Migration captures both voluntary relocation – for example, moving to another region for a better job or lower home prices – and involuntary relocation as a result of displacement. The dataset includes metropolitan area, regional, and county tables. DATA SOURCE American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Flows 2012-2015 5-year rolling average http://www.census.gov/topics/population/migration/data/tables.All.html CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Data for migration comes from the American Community Survey; county-to-county flow datasets experience a longer lag time than other standard datasets available in FactFinder. 5-year rolling average data was used for migration for all geographies, as the Census Bureau does not release 1-year annual data. Data is not available at any geography below the county level; note that flows that are relatively small on the county level are often within the margin of error. The metropolitan area comparison was performed for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, in addition to the primary MSAs for the nine other major metropolitan areas, by aggregating county data based on current metropolitan area boundaries. Data prior to 2011 is not available on Vital Signs due to inconsistent Census formats and a lack of net migration statistics for prior years. Only counties with a non-negligible flow are shown in the data; all other pairs can be assumed to have zero migration. Given that the vast majority of migration out of the region was to other counties in California, California counties were bundled into the following regions for simplicity: Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma Central Coast: Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz Central Valley: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare Los Angeles + Inland Empire: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura Sacramento: El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba San Diego: San Diego San Joaquin Valley: San Joaquin, Stanislaus Rural: all other counties (23) One key limitation of the American Community Survey migration data is that it is not able to track emigration (movement of current U.S. residents to other countries). This is despite the fact that it is able to quantify immigration (movement of foreign residents to the U.S.), generally by continent of origin. Thus the Vital Signs analysis focuses primarily on net domestic migration, while still specifically citing in-migration flows from countries abroad based on data availability.

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    Vital Signs: Migration - by county (detailed)

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:39:24.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Migration (EQ4) FULL MEASURE NAME Migration flows LAST UPDATED December 2018 DESCRIPTION Migration refers to the movement of people from one location to another, typically crossing a county or regional boundary. Migration captures both voluntary relocation – for example, moving to another region for a better job or lower home prices – and involuntary relocation as a result of displacement. The dataset includes metropolitan area, regional, and county tables. DATA SOURCE American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Flows 2012-2015 5-year rolling average http://www.census.gov/topics/population/migration/data/tables.All.html CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Data for migration comes from the American Community Survey; county-to-county flow datasets experience a longer lag time than other standard datasets available in FactFinder. 5-year rolling average data was used for migration for all geographies, as the Census Bureau does not release 1-year annual data. Data is not available at any geography below the county level; note that flows that are relatively small on the county level are often within the margin of error. The metropolitan area comparison was performed for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, in addition to the primary MSAs for the nine other major metropolitan areas, by aggregating county data based on current metropolitan area boundaries. Data prior to 2011 is not available on Vital Signs due to inconsistent Census formats and a lack of net migration statistics for prior years. Only counties with a non-negligible flow are shown in the data; all other pairs can be assumed to have zero migration. Given that the vast majority of migration out of the region was to other counties in California, California counties were bundled into the following regions for simplicity: Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma Central Coast: Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz Central Valley: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare Los Angeles + Inland Empire: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura Sacramento: El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba San Diego: San Diego San Joaquin Valley: San Joaquin, Stanislaus Rural: all other counties (23) One key limitation of the American Community Survey migration data is that it is not able to track emigration (movement of current U.S. residents to other countries). This is despite the fact that it is able to quantify immigration (movement of foreign residents to the U.S.), generally by continent of origin. Thus the Vital Signs analysis focuses primarily on net domestic migration, while still specifically citing in-migration flows from countries abroad based on data availability.

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    Vital Signs: Migration - by county (simple)

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:39:49.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Migration (EQ4) FULL MEASURE NAME Migration flows LAST UPDATED December 2018 DESCRIPTION Migration refers to the movement of people from one location to another, typically crossing a county or regional boundary. Migration captures both voluntary relocation – for example, moving to another region for a better job or lower home prices – and involuntary relocation as a result of displacement. The dataset includes metropolitan area, regional, and county tables. DATA SOURCE American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Flows 2012-2015 5-year rolling average http://www.census.gov/topics/population/migration/data/tables.All.html CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Data for migration comes from the American Community Survey; county-to-county flow datasets experience a longer lag time than other standard datasets available in FactFinder. 5-year rolling average data was used for migration for all geographies, as the Census Bureau does not release 1-year annual data. Data is not available at any geography below the county level; note that flows that are relatively small on the county level are often within the margin of error. The metropolitan area comparison was performed for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, in addition to the primary MSAs for the nine other major metropolitan areas, by aggregating county data based on current metropolitan area boundaries. Data prior to 2011 is not available on Vital Signs due to inconsistent Census formats and a lack of net migration statistics for prior years. Only counties with a non-negligible flow are shown in the data; all other pairs can be assumed to have zero migration. Given that the vast majority of migration out of the region was to other counties in California, California counties were bundled into the following regions for simplicity: Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma Central Coast: Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz Central Valley: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare Los Angeles + Inland Empire: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura Sacramento: El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba San Diego: San Diego San Joaquin Valley: San Joaquin, Stanislaus Rural: all other counties (23) One key limitation of the American Community Survey migration data is that it is not able to track emigration (movement of current U.S. residents to other countries). This is despite the fact that it is able to quantify immigration (movement of foreign residents to the U.S.), generally by continent of origin. Thus the Vital Signs analysis focuses primarily on net domestic migration, while still specifically citing in-migration flows from countries abroad based on data availability.

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    Vital Signs: Migration - metro

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:39:37.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Migration (EQ4) FULL MEASURE NAME Migration flows LAST UPDATED December 2018 DESCRIPTION Migration refers to the movement of people from one location to another, typically crossing a county or regional boundary. Migration captures both voluntary relocation – for example, moving to another region for a better job or lower home prices – and involuntary relocation as a result of displacement. The dataset includes metropolitan area, regional, and county tables. DATA SOURCE American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Flows 2012-2015 5-year rolling average http://www.census.gov/topics/population/migration/data/tables.All.html CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Data for migration comes from the American Community Survey; county-to-county flow datasets experience a longer lag time than other standard datasets available in FactFinder. 5-year rolling average data was used for migration for all geographies, as the Census Bureau does not release 1-year annual data. Data is not available at any geography below the county level; note that flows that are relatively small on the county level are often within the margin of error. The metropolitan area comparison was performed for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, in addition to the primary MSAs for the nine other major metropolitan areas, by aggregating county data based on current metropolitan area boundaries. Data prior to 2011 is not available on Vital Signs due to inconsistent Census formats and a lack of net migration statistics for prior years. Only counties with a non-negligible flow are shown in the data; all other pairs can be assumed to have zero migration. Given that the vast majority of migration out of the region was to other counties in California, California counties were bundled into the following regions for simplicity: Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma Central Coast: Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz Central Valley: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare Los Angeles + Inland Empire: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura Sacramento: El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba San Diego: San Diego San Joaquin Valley: San Joaquin, Stanislaus Rural: all other counties (23) One key limitation of the American Community Survey migration data is that it is not able to track emigration (movement of current U.S. residents to other countries). This is despite the fact that it is able to quantify immigration (movement of foreign residents to the U.S.), generally by continent of origin. Thus the Vital Signs analysis focuses primarily on net domestic migration, while still specifically citing in-migration flows from countries abroad based on data availability.

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    COVID-19 Vaccinations Given to SF Residents by Demographics Over Time

    data.sfgov.org | Last Updated 2023-02-03T16:17:14.000Z

    <strong>Note: On 1/31/2023 we updated our data to reflect the 2020 Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) San Francisco Population estimates.</strong> <strong>A. SUMMARY</strong> This dataset represents the COVID-19 vaccinations given to residents of San Francisco over time. All vaccines given to SF residents are included, no matter where the vaccination took place (the vaccine may have been administered in San Francisco or outside of San Francisco). The data are broken down by multiple demographic stratifications. This dataset also includes COVID-19 vaccinations given to SF residents by the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH) over time. Data provides counts for residents who have received at least one dose, residents who have completed a primary vaccine series, residents who have received one or two monovalent (not bivalent) booster doses, and residents who have received a bivalent booster dose. A primary vaccine series is complete after an individual has received all intended doses of the initial series. There are one, two, and three dose primary vaccine series. <strong>B. HOW THE DATASET IS CREATED</strong> Information on doses administered to those who live in San Francisco is from the <a href="https://cdph.ca.gov/CAIR ">California Immunization Registry (CAIR2)</a>, run by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The information on individuals’ city of residence, age, race, and ethnicity are also recorded in CAIR and are self-reported at the time of vaccine administration. In order to estimate the percent of San Franciscans vaccinated, we provide the 2016-2020 American Community Survey (ACS) population estimates for each demographic group. <strong>C. UPDATE PROCESS</strong> Updated daily via automated process <strong>D. HOW TO USE THIS DATASET</strong> San Francisco population estimates for race/ethnicity and age groups can be found in a <a href=" https://data.sfgov.org/d/cedd-86uf">view based on the San Francisco Population and Demographic Census dataset</a>. These population estimates are from the 2016-2020 5-year American Community Survey (ACS). Before analysis, you must filter the dataset to the desired stratification of data using the "overall_segment" column. For example, filtering "overall_segment" to "All SF Residents by Age Bracket, Administered by All Providers" will filter the data to residents whose vaccinations were administered by any provider. You can then further segment the data and calculate percentages by Age Brackets. If you filter "overall_segment" to "All SF Residents by Race/Ethnicity, Administered by DPH Only", you will see the race/ethnicity breakdown for residents who received vaccinations from the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH). If you filter "overall_segment" to "All SF Residents by Age Group, Administered by All Providers" you will see vaccination counts of various age eligibility groups that were administered by any provider. To count the number of individuals vaccinated (with any primary series dose) for the first time on a given day, use the "new_recipients" column. To count the number of individuals who have completed their primary vaccine series on a given day, use the "new_series_completed" column. To count the number of primary series doses administered on a day (1st, 2nd, 3rd, or single doses), use the "new_primary_series_doses" column. To count the number of individuals who received their first or second monovalent (not bivalent) booster dose on a given day, use the "new_booster_recipients" and "new_2nd_booster_recipients" columns. To count the number of individuals who received their first bivalent booster dose on a given day, use the "new_bivalent_booster_recipients" column. To count the number of monovalent (not including bivalent) or bivalent booster doses administered on a given day, use the "new_booster_doses" or "new_bivalent_booster_doses" columns. To count the number of individuals who have re