The population count of Hanford Metro Area (CA) was 150,075 in 2018. The population count of Yuba City Metro Area (CA) was 171,365 in 2018.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Yuba City Metro Area (CA) or Hanford Metro Area (CA)

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    San Mateo County And California Crime Rates 2000-2014

    performance.smcgov.org | Last Updated 2016-08-31T20:40:07.000Z

    Violent and property crime rates per 100,000 population for San Mateo County and the State of California. The total crimes used to calculate the rates for San Mateo County include data from: Sheriff's Department Unincorporated, Atherton, Belmont, Brisbane, Broadmoor, Burlingame, Colma, Daly City, East Palo Alto, Foster City, Half Moon Bay, Hillsborough, Menlo Park, Millbrae, Pacifica, Redwood City, San Bruno, San Carlos, San Mateo, South San Francisco, Bay Area DPR, BART, Union Pacific Railroad, and CA Highway Patrol.

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    COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Given to San Franciscans by Demographics Over Time

    data.sfgov.org | Last Updated 2022-08-10T15:19:22.000Z

    <strong>A. SUMMARY</strong> This dataset represents doses of COVID-19 vaccine administered in California to San Francisco residents over time. All vaccines given to people who live in San Francisco are included, no matter where the vaccination took place (the vaccine may have been administered in San Francisco or outside of San Francisco). The data are broken down by multiple demographic stratifications. <strong>B. HOW THE DATASET IS CREATED</strong> Information on doses administered to those who live in San Francisco is from the <a href="https://cairweb.org/about-cair/">California Immunization Registry (CAIR)</a>, run by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The information on individuals’ city of residence, age, race, and ethnicity are also recorded in CAIR and are self-reported at the time of vaccine administration. In order to estimate the percent of San Franciscans vaccinated, we provide <a href="https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=popualtion%20age&g=0500000US06075&tid=ACSST5Y2019.S0101&hidePreview=false">the same 2019 five-year American Community Survey population estimates</a> that are used in <a href="https://data.sfgov.org/stories/s/COVID-19-Vaccinations-Progress/7mye-zncy/">our public dashboards</a>. <strong>C. UPDATE PROCESS</strong> Updated daily via automated process <strong>D. HOW TO USE THIS DATASET</strong> Before analysis, you must filter the dataset to the desired stratification of data using the OVERALL_SEGMENT column. For example, filtering OVERALL_SEGMENT to "Ages 5+ by Age Bracket, Administered by All Providers" will filter the data to residents 5 and over whose vaccinations were administered by any provider. You can then further segment the data and calculate percentages by Age Brackets. If you filter OVERALL_SEGMENT to "Ages 65+ by Race/Ethnicity, Administered by DPH Only", you will see the race/ethnicity breakdown for residents aged 65+ who received vaccinations from San Francisco’s Department of Public Health (DPH).

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    CHSA - ECON -- Food Insecurity --- 2-Year Dissected

    healthstat.dph.sbcounty.gov | Last Updated 2019-03-13T19:07:43.000Z

    Percent of People who Cannot Afford to Feed Themselves Sufficiently. U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, December Supplement (AKA USDA Food Security Supplement). Dissected by Year, Geographic Area, Age Category, and Race/Ethnicity.

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    COVID-19 Cases by Population Characteristics Over Time

    data.sfgov.org | Last Updated 2022-08-11T12:03:19.000Z

    Note: On September 12, 2021, a new case definition of COVID-19 was introduced that includes criteria for enumerating new infections after previous probable or confirmed infections (also known as reinfections). A reinfection is defined as a confirmed positive PCR lab test more than 90 days after a positive PCR or antigen test. The first reinfection case was identified on December 7, 2021. Some fluctuation in historic data may result when this change is implemented on July 15, 2022. Note: As of March 2022, the race/ethnicity label changed from Native American to American Indian or Alaska Native to align with the Census. Note: On January 22, 2022, system updates to improve the timeliness and accuracy of San Francisco COVID-19 cases and deaths data were implemented. You might see some fluctuations in historic data as a result of this change. Due to the changes, starting on January 22, 2022, the number of new cases reported daily will be higher than under the old system as cases that would have taken longer to process will be reported earlier. <strong>A. SUMMARY</strong> This dataset shows San Francisco COVID-19 cases by population characteristics and by specimen collection date. Cases are included on the date the positive test was collected. Population characteristics are subgroups, or demographic cross-sections, like age, race, or gender. The City tracks how cases have been distributed among different subgroups. This information can reveal trends and disparities among groups. Data is lagged by five days, meaning the most recent specimen collection date included is 5 days prior to today. Tests take time to process and report, so more recent data is less reliable. <strong>B. HOW THE DATASET IS CREATED</strong> Data on the population characteristics of COVID-19 cases and deaths are from: * Case interviews * Laboratories * Medical providers These multiple streams of data are merged, deduplicated, and undergo data verification processes. This data may not be immediately available for recently reported cases because of the time needed to process tests and validate cases. Daily case totals on previous days may increase or decrease. <u><a href="https://data.sfgov.org/s/nudz-9tg2/">Learn more</a></u>. Data are continually updated to maximize completeness of information and reporting on San Francisco residents with COVID-19. Data notes on each population characteristic type is listed below. <u> Race/ethnicity</u> * We include all race/ethnicity categories that are collected for COVID-19 cases. * The population estimates for the "Other" or “Multi-racial” groups should be considered with caution. The Census definition is likely not exactly aligned with how the City collects this data. For that reason, we do not recommend calculating population rates for these groups. <u> Sexual orientation</u> * The City began asking adults 18 years old or older for their sexual orientation identification during case interviews as of April 28, 2020. Sexual orientation data prior to this date is unavailable. * The City doesn’t collect or report information about sexual orientation for persons under 12 years of age. * Case investigation interviews transitioned to the California Department of Public Health, Virtual Assistant information gathering beginning December 2021. The Virtual Assistant is only sent to adults who are 18+ years old.<u><a href="https://www.sfdph.org/dph/files/PoliciesProcedures/COM9_SexualOrientationGuidelines.pdf"> Learn more about our data collection guidelines pertaining to sexual orientation</a></u>. <u> Gender</u> * The City collects information on gender identity using <a href="https://www.sfdph.org/dph/files/PoliciesProcedures/COM5_SexGenderGuidelines.pdf">these guidelines</a>. <u> Comorbidities</u> * Underlying conditions are reported when a person has one or more underlying health conditions at the time of diagnosis or death. <u> Transmission type</u> * Information on transmission of COVID-19 is based on ca

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    Vital Signs: Migration - Bay Area

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-10-25T20:40:04.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Migration (EQ4) FULL MEASURE NAME Migration flows LAST UPDATED December 2018 DESCRIPTION Migration refers to the movement of people from one location to another, typically crossing a county or regional boundary. Migration captures both voluntary relocation – for example, moving to another region for a better job or lower home prices – and involuntary relocation as a result of displacement. The dataset includes metropolitan area, regional, and county tables. DATA SOURCE American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Flows 2012-2015 5-year rolling average http://www.census.gov/topics/population/migration/data/tables.All.html CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Data for migration comes from the American Community Survey; county-to-county flow datasets experience a longer lag time than other standard datasets available in FactFinder. 5-year rolling average data was used for migration for all geographies, as the Census Bureau does not release 1-year annual data. Data is not available at any geography below the county level; note that flows that are relatively small on the county level are often within the margin of error. The metropolitan area comparison was performed for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, in addition to the primary MSAs for the nine other major metropolitan areas, by aggregating county data based on current metropolitan area boundaries. Data prior to 2011 is not available on Vital Signs due to inconsistent Census formats and a lack of net migration statistics for prior years. Only counties with a non-negligible flow are shown in the data; all other pairs can be assumed to have zero migration. Given that the vast majority of migration out of the region was to other counties in California, California counties were bundled into the following regions for simplicity: Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma Central Coast: Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz Central Valley: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare Los Angeles + Inland Empire: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura Sacramento: El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba San Diego: San Diego San Joaquin Valley: San Joaquin, Stanislaus Rural: all other counties (23) One key limitation of the American Community Survey migration data is that it is not able to track emigration (movement of current U.S. residents to other countries). This is despite the fact that it is able to quantify immigration (movement of foreign residents to the U.S.), generally by continent of origin. Thus the Vital Signs analysis focuses primarily on net domestic migration, while still specifically citing in-migration flows from countries abroad based on data availability.

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    Vital Signs: Injuries From Crashes – by crash

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2018-07-06T18:04:04.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Injuries From Crashes (EN7-9) FULL MEASURE NAME Serious injuries from crashes (traffic collisions) LAST UPDATED October 2017 DESCRIPTION Injuries from crashes refers to serious but not fatal injuries sustained in a collision. The California Highway Patrol classifies a serious injury as any combination of the following: broken bones; dislocated or distorted limbs; severe lacerations; skull, spinal, chest or abdominal injuries that go beyond visible injuries; unconsciousness at or when taken from the scene; or severe burns. This injuries dataset includes serious injury counts for the region and counties, as well as individual collision data. DATA SOURCE California Highway Patrol: Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The data is reported by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) to the Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS), which was accessed via SafeTREC’s Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS). The data was tabulated using provided categories specifying injury level, individuals involved, causes of collision, and location/jurisdiction of collision (for more: http://tims.berkeley.edu/help/files/switrs_codebook.doc). Fatalities were normalized over historic population data from the US Census and American Community Surveys and vehicle miles traveled (VMT) data from the Federal Highway Administration. For more regarding reporting procedures and injury classification, see the California Highway Patrol Manual (http://www.nhtsa.gov/nhtsa/stateCatalog/states/ca/docs/CACHP555Manual_22003ch1-13.pdf).

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    Vital Signs: Fatalities From Crashes – by crash

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2018-07-06T18:04:12.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Injuries From Crashes (EN4-6) FULL MEASURE NAME Fatalities from crashes (traffic collisions) LAST UPDATED October 2017 DESCRIPTION Fatalities from crashes refers to deaths as a result of injuries sustained in collisions. The California Highway Patrol includes deaths within 30 days of the collision that are a result of injuries sustained as part of this metric. This total fatalities dataset includes fatality counts for the region and counties, as well as individual collision data and metropolitan area data. DATA SOURCE National Highway Safety Administration: Fatality Analysis Reporting System CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) The data is reported by the National Highway Safety Administration's Fatalities Analysis Reporting System. 2016 data comes from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) to the Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS), which was accessed via SafeTREC’s Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS). The data was tabulated using provided categories specifying injury level, individuals involved, causes of collision, and location/jurisdiction of collision (for more: http://tims.berkeley.edu/help/files/switrs_codebook.doc). Fatalities were normalized over historic population data from the US Census and California Department of Finance and vehicle miles traveled (VMT) data from the Federal Highway Administration. For more regarding reporting procedures and injury classification see the California Highway Patrol Manual (http://www.nhtsa.gov/nhtsa/stateCatalog/states/ca/docs/CA_CHP555_Manual_2_2003_ch1-13.pdf).

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    Vital Signs: Income (Median by Place of Residence) - by city

    data.bayareametro.gov | Last Updated 2019-08-13T16:16:34.000Z

    VITAL SIGNS INDICATOR Income (EC4) FULL MEASURE NAME Household income by place of residence LAST UPDATED May 2019 DESCRIPTION Income reflects the median earnings of individuals and households from employment, as well as the income distribution by quintile. Income data highlight how employees are being compensated for their work on an inflation-adjusted basis. DATA SOURCE U.S. Census Bureau: Decennial Census Count 4Pb (1970) Form STF3 (1980-1990) Form SF3a (2000) https://nhgis.org U.S. Census Bureau: American Community Survey Form B19013 (2006-2017; place of residence) http://api.census.gov Bureau of Labor Statistics: Consumer Price Index All Urban Consumers Data Table (1970-2017; specific to each metro area) http://data.bls.gov CONTACT INFORMATION vitalsigns.info@bayareametro.gov METHODOLOGY NOTES (across all datasets for this indicator) Income data reported in a given year reflects the income earned in the prior year (decennial Census) or in the prior 12 months (American Community Survey); note that this inconsistency has a minor effect on historical comparisons (for more information, go to: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/methodology/ASA_nelson.pdf). American Community Survey 1-year data is used for larger geographies – metropolitan areas and counties – while smaller geographies rely upon 5-year rolling average data due to their smaller sample sizes. Quintile income for 1970-2000 is imputed from Decennial Census data using methodology from the California Department of Finance (for more information, go to: http://www.dof.ca.gov/Forecasting/Demographics/Census_Data_Center_Network/documents/How_to_Recalculate_a_Median.pdf). Bay Area income is the population weighted average of county-level income. Income has been inflated using the Consumer Price Index specific to each metro area; however, some metro areas lack metro-specific CPI data back to 1970 and therefore adjusted data is unavailable for some historical data points. Note that current MSA boundaries were used for historical comparison by identifying counties included in today’s metro areas.